archive-org.com » ORG » P » PHYS.ORG

Total: 405

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Phys.org - Advanced Healthcare Materials
    anywhere including physicians in the clinic patients in their Mar 02 2015 in Engineering 1264 0 Antimicrobial film for future implants The implantation of medical devices is not without risks Bacterial or fungal infections can occur and the body s strong immune response may lead to the rejection of the implant Researchers at Unit 1121 Biomaterials and Sep 23 2015 in Polymers 18 0 Nano paper filter removes viruses Nanotechnology and Functional Materials Uppsala University have developed a paper filter which can remove virus particles with the efficiency matching that of the best industrial virus filters The paper filter consists Mar 31 2014 in Nanomaterials 0 0 Catheter innovation destroys dangerous biofilms For the millions of people forced to rely on a plastic tube to eliminate their urine developing an infection is nearly a 100 percent guarantee after just four weeks But with the help of a little bubble blowing biomedical Mar 25 2014 in Materials Science 1 0 Painless wearable microneedle device may reduce trips to doctors offices Phys org Patients trying to navigate today s complex medical system with its costly laboratory analyses might prefer a pain free home diagnostic device worn on the wrist that can analyze continuously record and immediately Jun 03 2014 in Analytical Chemistry 0 0 Nanotechnology improves cardiovascular implant attachment Phys org Jeong Yeol Yoon associate professor of agricultural and biosystems engineering and Dr Marvin Slepian professor of cardiology and biomedical engineering collaborated to test how nanotechnology based techniques Nov 26 2013 in Bio Medicine 0 0 New optimized coatings for implants reduce risk of infection Implants are commonly made from metals such as titanium alloys These materials are being made porous during processing used to prepare them for medical use Whereas this is important to ensure good contact between the implant Dec

    Original URL path: http://phys.org/journals/advanced-healthcare-materials/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Phys.org - Vanderbilt University
    Science 3130 2 Evidence that Earth s first mass extinction was caused by critters not catastrophe In the popular mind mass extinctions are associated with catastrophic events like giant meteorite impacts and volcanic super eruptions Sep 02 2015 in Earth Sciences 4936 72 New model of cosmic stickiness favors Big Rip demise of universe The universe can be a very sticky place but just how sticky is a matter of debate Jun 30 2015 in General Physics 11471 91 Quantum dots made from fool s gold boost battery performance If you add quantum dots nanocrystals 10 000 times smaller than the width of a human hair to a smartphone battery it will charge in 30 seconds but the effect only lasts for a few recharge cycles Nov 11 2015 in Nanophysics 2579 0 The pronoun I is becoming obsolete Don t look now but the pronoun I is becoming obsolete Aug 19 2015 in Cell Microbiology 2916 117 Electric eels curl up to deliver even more powerful shocks The electric eel may be one of the most remarkable predators in the entire animal kingdom That is the conclusion of Kenneth Catania Stevenson Professor of Biological Sciences at Vanderbilt University who has spent the Oct 28 2015 in Plants Animals 924 0 New class of DNA repair enzyme discovered This year s Nobel Prize in chemistry was given to three scientists who each focused on one piece of the DNA repair puzzle Now a new study reported online Oct 28 in the journal Nature reports the discovery of a new class Oct 29 2015 in Cell Microbiology 4661 70 New geospeedometer confirms super eruptions have short fuses Repeatedly throughout Earth s history giant pools of magma greater than 100 cubic miles in volume have formed a few miles below the surface

    Original URL path: http://phys.org/partners/vanderbilt-university/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cotton candy machines may hold key for making artificial organs
    that have the thickness of real organs and keep cells alive throughout the entire scaffold the researchers must build in a network of channels that allow fluids to flow through the system mimicking the natural capillary system There are two basic methods that researchers use to create artificial capillary systems bottom up and top down Microvascular network perfused with liquid Figure B is magnification of the area in Figure A outlined in white Credit Bellan Lab Vanderbilt In the bottom up process scientists culture cells in a thin slab of gel and after some time they spontaneously begin creating capillaries Although this approach has the advantage of simplicity it has one fundamental problem It can take weeks for the cells to create such a network So it isn t possible to stack the cells too high or the ones in the center begin dying off before the crucial capillary network forms As a result Bellan is using a top down approach He reports that his cotton candy spinning method can produce channels ranging from three to 55 microns with a mean diameter of 35 microns So far the other top down approaches have only managed to create networks with microchannels larger than 100 microns about ten times the size of capillaries he said In addition many of these other techniques are not able to form networks as complex as the cotton candy approach Bellan s focus on this unique use of a cotton candy machine dates back to graduate school At the time he was doing research on electrospinning a process of making nanofibers using strong electric fields He went to a lecture on tissue engineering where the speaker discussed the need to create an artificial vascular system to support cells in thick engineered tissue He realized that electrospinning can make networks somewhat resembling capillaries but at a much smaller scale The analogies everyone uses to describe electrospun fibers are that they look like silly string or Cheese Whiz or cotton candy said Bellan So I decided to give the cotton candy machine a try I went to Target and bought a cotton candy machine for about 40 It turned out that it formed threads that were about one tenth the diameter of a human hair roughly the same size as capillaries so they could be used to make channel structures in other materials However getting from that point to creating artificial capillaries that work was not a simple matter If you create a network of fibers using sugar when you pour a hydrogel on it the sugar dissolves away because the hydrogel is mostly water This illustrates what Bellan describes as the Catch 22 in creating such sacrificial structures First the material has to be insoluble in water when you make the mold so it doesn t dissolve when you pour the gel Then it must dissolve in water to create the microchannels because cells will only grow in aqueous environments he explained The researchers experimented with a number

    Original URL path: http://phys.org/print374170677.html (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Scientists use 3D printing to make artificial blood vessels
    successful formation of endothelial monolayers within the fabricated channels was achieved In the future 3D printing technology may be used to develop transplantable tissues customized to each patient s needs or be used outside the body to develop drugs that are safe and effective said Khademhosseini Explore further Biomaterials Hydrogel fibers make tissue generation efficient Journal reference Lab on a Chip Provided by Brigham and Women s Hospital 0 shares feedback to editors Tweet Favorites Email Print PDF Featured Last comments Popular Detection of gravitational waves would open new window on universe Feb 10 2016 58 Gravitational waves detected 100 years after Einstein s prediction Feb 11 2016 144 Physicists create first photonic Maxwell s demon 15 hours ago 3 GPS tracking down to the centimeter Feb 11 2016 10 A metal that behaves like water Feb 11 2016 2 more Phys org on facebook Relevant PhysicsForums posts When is ΔH ΔU 6 hours ago Which group has greater steric hindrance Feb 11 2016 Comparison Calibration Method Feb 11 2016 Which compound will be extracted in organic layer Feb 10 2016 Kinetic vs thermodynamics control Feb 10 2016 Electroplating with mixed metal electrodes Feb 10 2016 More from Chemistry Related Stories Biomaterials Hydrogel fibers make tissue generation efficient December 19 2013 Much research has been devoted to generating viable tissues to replace damaged tissues in organs such as the liver Incorporating cellular and vascular networks into engineered tissues increases the potential of the biomaterial An essential step toward printing living tissues February 19 2014 A new bioprinting method developed at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences SEAS creates intricately patterned 3D tissue Liver like device via 3 D printer May 13 2014 Phys org Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a 3 D printed device inspired by the liver to remove dangerous toxins from the blood Recommended for you A new form of frozen water Scientists reveal new ice with record low density February 12 2016 Amid the season known for transforming Nebraska into an outdoor ice rink a University of Nebraska Lincoln led research team has predicted a new molecular form of the slippery stuff that even Mother Nature has never borne New experimental test detects signs of Lyme disease near time of infection February 12 2016 When it comes to early diagnosis of Lyme disease the insidious tick borne illness that afflicts about 300 000 Americans annually finding the proverbial needle in the haystack might be a far easier challenge until now Visible blue light induces copper catalyzed C N cross couplings February 12 2016 Phys org A small team of researchers at California Institute of Technology has found a way to use visible blue light to induce copper catalyzed C N cross couplings In their paper published in the journal Science the Mussel mimicking adhesive polymer shown to be non toxic to cells February 12 2016 Purdue University researchers have

    Original URL path: http://phys.org/news/2014-05-scientists-3d-artificial-blood-vessels.html (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Ultrafast lasers offer 3-D micropatterning of biocompatible silk hydrogels
    micropatterning of biocompatible hydrogels for customized tissue engineering scaffolds PNAS Early Edition DOI 10 1073 pnas 1509405112 Journal reference Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Provided by Tufts University 553 shares feedback to editors Tweet Favorites Email Print PDF Featured Last comments Popular Detection of gravitational waves would open new window on universe Feb 10 2016 58 Gravitational waves detected 100 years after Einstein s prediction Feb 11 2016 144 Physicists create first photonic Maxwell s demon 15 hours ago 3 GPS tracking down to the centimeter Feb 11 2016 10 A metal that behaves like water Feb 11 2016 2 more Phys org on facebook Relevant PhysicsForums posts When is ΔH ΔU 6 hours ago Which group has greater steric hindrance Feb 11 2016 Comparison Calibration Method Feb 11 2016 Which compound will be extracted in organic layer Feb 10 2016 Kinetic vs thermodynamics control Feb 10 2016 Electroplating with mixed metal electrodes Feb 10 2016 More from Chemistry Related Stories Silk based optical waveguides meet biomedical needs August 31 2009 There is a growing need for biocompatible photonic components for biomedical applications from in vivo glucose monitoring to detecting harmful viruses or the telltale markers of Alzheimer s Optical waveguides are of Implantable silk optics multi task in the body November 28 2012 Tufts University School of Engineering researchers have demonstrated silk based implantable optics that offer significant improvement in tissue imaging while simultaneously enabling photo thermal therapy administering drugs Fabricating nanostructures with silk could make clean rooms green rooms March 28 2014 Phys org Tufts University engineers have demonstrated that it is possible to generate nanostructures from silk in an environmentally friendly process that uses water as a developing agent and standard fabrication techniques Wireless electronic implants stop staph then dissolve November 24 2014 Researchers at Tufts University in collaboration with a team at the University of Illinois at Champaign Urbana have demonstrated a resorbable electronic implant that eliminated bacterial infection in mice by delivering Inkjet inks made of bioactive silk could yield smart bandages and other innovations June 17 2015 Silk inks containing enzymes antibiotics antibodies nanoparticles and growth factors could turn inkjet printing into a new more effective tool for therapeutics regenerative medicine and biosensing according to new research Silk bio ink could help advance tissue engineering with 3 D printers September 2 2015 Advances in 3 D printing have led to new ways to make bone and some other relatively simple body parts that can be implanted in patients But finding an ideal bio ink has stalled progress toward printing more complex tissues Recommended for you A new form of frozen water Scientists reveal new ice with record low density February 12 2016 Amid the season known for transforming Nebraska into an outdoor ice rink a University of Nebraska Lincoln led research team has predicted a new molecular form of the slippery stuff that even Mother Nature has never borne New experimental test detects signs of Lyme disease near time of infection February

    Original URL path: http://phys.org/news/2015-09-ultrafast-lasers-d-micropatterning-biocompatible.html (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Failed candy recipe solves sticky problem in the lab
    cast the final pillars The researchers pour in hard silicone to create an initial plastic mold Next the molten sugar mixture is poured into this initial plastic mold and left to cool hardening into what looks a lot like a piece of hard candy The hardened sugar is popped out of the initial plastic mold and the sugar is then used as a mold for the silicone The researchers pour the silicone into the sugar mold and cure the concoction in an oven Finally the silicone and sugar mold are put into a water bath The sugar dissolves while the water repellent silicone stays intact The team is using the new process to better understand how scar tissue forms inside the body Internal scarring is a common occurrence in diseases like cancer and diabetes where the body tries to repair organ damage done by the disease The formation of scar tissue can cause further problems by preventing organs from working properly Scarring happens when the body s healing process goes too far Takayama said If we can prevent it from happening or even reverse it we could reduce the impact of a lot of diseases and create better outcomes for patients Explore further Tiny silicone spheres come out of the mist More information Christopher Moraes et al Supersoft lithography candy based fabrication of soft silicone microstructures Lab Chip 2015 DOI 10 1039 C5LC00722D Provided by University of Michigan 114 shares feedback to editors Tweet Favorites Email Print PDF Featured Last comments Popular Detection of gravitational waves would open new window on universe Feb 10 2016 58 Gravitational waves detected 100 years after Einstein s prediction Feb 11 2016 144 Physicists create first photonic Maxwell s demon 15 hours ago 3 GPS tracking down to the centimeter Feb 11 2016 10 A metal that behaves like water Feb 11 2016 2 more Phys org on facebook Relevant PhysicsForums posts When is ΔH ΔU 6 hours ago Which group has greater steric hindrance Feb 11 2016 Comparison Calibration Method Feb 11 2016 Which compound will be extracted in organic layer Feb 10 2016 Kinetic vs thermodynamics control Feb 10 2016 Electroplating with mixed metal electrodes Feb 10 2016 More from Chemistry Related Stories Tiny silicone spheres come out of the mist May 6 2015 Technology in common household humidifiers could enable the next wave of high tech medical imaging and targeted medicine thanks to a new method for making tiny silicone microspheres developed by chemists at the University Porous material holds promise for prosthetics robots October 8 2015 Cornell researchers have developed a new lightweight and stretchable material with the consistency of memory foam that has potential for use in prosthetic body parts artificial organs and soft robotics The foam is unique Recommended for you A new form of frozen water Scientists reveal new ice with record low density February 12 2016 Amid the season known for transforming Nebraska into an outdoor ice rink a University of Nebraska Lincoln led research team

    Original URL path: http://phys.org/news/2015-10-candy-recipe-sticky-problem-lab.html (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Squeezing cells into stem cells
    a large number of cells to produce stem cells on an industrial scale Lutolf s lab is looking into this but their main focus is to better understand the phenomenon and to find the sweet spots for other cell types Explore further Stem cell study could aid quest to combat range of diseases More information Caiazzo M Okawa Y Ranga A Piersigilli A Tabata Y Lutolf MP Defined three dimensional microenvironments boost the induction of stem cell pluripotency Nature Materials 11 January 2016 DOI 10 1038 nmat4536 Journal reference Nature Materials Provided by Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne 397 shares feedback to editors Tweet Favorites Email Print PDF Featured Last comments Popular Detection of gravitational waves would open new window on universe Feb 10 2016 58 Gravitational waves detected 100 years after Einstein s prediction Feb 11 2016 144 Physicists create first photonic Maxwell s demon 15 hours ago 3 GPS tracking down to the centimeter Feb 11 2016 10 A metal that behaves like water Feb 11 2016 2 more Phys org on facebook Relevant PhysicsForums posts The great basic question of science on origin of life 2 hours ago How to create microscope videos 2 hours ago Fly feeling 11 hours ago Why do you get pressure drop in central circulation 12 hours ago Novel Idea on the Origin of Life 13 hours ago Opening the blood brain barrier with collapsing bubbles 21 hours ago More from Biology and Medical Related Stories Stem cell study could aid quest to combat range of diseases June 3 2013 Scientists have taken a vital step forward in understanding how cells from skin tissue can be reprogrammed to become stem cells Dead feeder cells support stem cell growth April 24 2015 Stem cells naturally cling to feeder cells as they grow in petri dishes Scientists have thought for years that this attachment occurs because feeder cells serve as a support system providing stems cells with essential nutrients A Prkci gene keeps stem cells in check October 31 2015 When it comes to stem cells too much of a good thing isn t wonderful producing too many new stem cells may lead to cancer producing too few inhibits the repair and maintenance of the body Recommended for you Jaws may help humans grow new teeth shark study suggests February 12 2016 A new insight into how sharks regenerate their teeth which may pave the way for the development of therapies to help humans with tooth loss has been discovered by scientists at the University of Sheffield Urbanization leads to change in type of bacteria in the home February 12 2016 Whether it s a jungle hut or a high rise apartment your home is covered in bacteria and new research from the Amazon suggests city dwellers might want to open a window On Darwin s birthday tomato genetics study sheds light on plant evolution February 12 2016 On Charles Darwin s 207th birthday a new study of evolution in a diverse group of

    Original URL path: http://phys.org/news/2016-01-cells-stem.html (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Materials Science News - Chemistry News(... continued page 2)
    engineered a new synthetic biopathway that can more efficiently and cost effectively turn agricultural waste like corn stover and orange peels into a variety of useful products Feb 08 2016 in Materials Science 122 1 Nature s mirror the code for chirality How information is transferred from biological molecules to crystalline surfaces could pave the way for the development of new drugs and other synthetic materials Feb 08 2016 in Materials Science 16 0 Clean energy from water Fuel cells generate electrical energy through a chemical reaction of hydrogen and oxygen To obtain clean energy the splitting of water into its components of hydrogen and oxygen is critical Researchers at the University Feb 08 2016 in Materials Science 14 0 Natural selection could lead to amazing new materials Teflon and Kevlar are man made materials that have changed the world They were also invented by accident Feb 08 2016 in Materials Science 8 0 Uncovering secrets of elastin s flexibility during assembly Elastin is a crucial building block in our bodies its flexibility allows skin to stretch and twist blood vessels to expand and relax with every heartbeat and lungs to swell and contract with each breath But exactly how Feb 05 2016 in Materials Science 436 0 Researchers seek efficient means of splitting water Photovoltaics promise to help meet our energy needs by turning sunlight into electricity We can t run everything that way but with a little tweaking photovoltaic materials can use solar energy to split water into hydrogen Feb 05 2016 in Materials Science 25 1 Seeing carbon dioxide as a raw material rather than a waste product could lead to a more sustainable future Penn State researcher Chunshan Song has a plan to address one of the most important issues facing the world today reducing greenhouse

    Original URL path: http://phys.org/chemistry-news/materials-science/sort/date/all/page2.html (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  •