archive-org.com » ORG » P » PICKEREUROPE.ORG

Total: 346

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • A universal service requires universal listening - Dr Andrew McCulloch on communicating with diverse groups - Picker Institute Europe
    massive negative impact on a patient s experience and lead to serious health inequalities No matter who you are if you go to a service and have a negative experience for example a senior citizen being told this is for young people or a trans person being addressed with the wrong pro noun it will form a lasting memory with a lasting negative impact that can result in the individual not returning to the said service A choice that could prove to have detrimental health implications To communicate effectively with a service user you have to understand their needs and preferences and this is impossible without effective feedback Good communication starts with feeling comfortable getting someone to open up and share personal details about themselves is impossible if they do not Sometimes it s not so much the communicator s unconscious prejudice that has to be considered but the service user s Sexually abused women for example may not feel comfortable discussing personal details with men instead they may feel more at ease doing so with their peers someone from their specific group Healthcare providers can support and facilitate service users to collect some of their peers views on behalf of providers The same principles apply to constructing surveys they must be built around the needs and interests of the target group To be effective consistent consultation is required and researchers must work with that group to establish what their priorities are and how they wish to communicate Focus groups help to ensure that the core principles of a tool relate back to the needs and priorities of the patient group And that whether communicating verbally or on another platform we are receptive to their needs and listening appropriately at all times An effective survey is also targeted and objective One way of achieving this is to work with local patient groups inviting them to comment on survey data results and breakdown the meaning behind them in real terms Whether qualitative or quantitative an instrument or methodology has to be built around the needs and preferences of the group Otherwise the final tool and questions could be seen as irrelevant or worse alienating and fuelling a negative experience Understanding that people s experiences differ and need to be captured in different ways depending on their patient group and condition is key to the Picker Institute s mission Our full commitment to enabling and supporting colleagues to listen to and capture diverse voices is reflected in our array of varied and impactful projects For example the recent PREM that we developed for people living with Sickle Cell Disorder is now available nationally and the responses being used to inform key care improvements Our continued collaboration with the Motor Neurone Disease Association MND Association looking at people s experiences of end of life care also continues to have impact The publication End of Life a guide for people with motor neurone disease created by the MND Association and formed around evidence from

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/news/blog/a-universal-service-requires-universal-listening/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Blog - Picker Institute Europe
    Circles of Support collaboration Commissioning communication Community Mental Health Survey Cultural Change Dementia Election 2015 End of life care families Friends and Family Test Health and Social Care health and social care policy Healthcare Healthtalk org Healthwatch Oxfordshire Individual Clinician Feedback informed consent Inpatients Survey Internet Involvement ISQua Jeremy Corbyn Labour Labour Party Conference learning disabilities Long term Conditions maternity Maternity Survey Mental Health National Survey Programme NHS NHS England parents Partnerships patient experience Patient Experience Network Awards Patient feedback Patient Opinion PEN Person centred care Policy politics principles of patient centred care Quality Royal College Midwives Ruth Evans Safety self management service user feedback Shared Decision Making Sickle Cell Disorder Social Media Staff the King s Fund Transition Transparency Trends Waiting Times February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 October 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 Dr Andrew McCulloch Giuseppe Paparella Steve Sizmur Bridget Hopwood Steve Bough Chris Graham Phil Stylianides Amy Tallett Vincent Coole Amanda Attwood Sir Donald Irvine CBE MD FRCGP FRCP FMedSci Previous 1 of 1

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/blog/?author_guest=James%20Munro,%20CEO%20Patient%20Opinion (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Good communication is at the root of humanity in healthcare: James Munro; CEO Patient Opinion, on learning from patient stories - Picker Institute Europe
    and that I was seen as a person not a problem https www patientopinion org uk opinions 229431 Good communication is a prerequisite for trust as this patient about to undergo a procedure for kidney cancer made clear My first meeting with Dr Wah filled me with complete confidence She explained the procedure the hopeful outcome and completely reassured me https www patientopinion org uk opinions 225096 When communication is poor or absent trust very quickly falls away A patient concerned about possible cancer wrote Communication is appalling within this department I received conflicting information and nothing as yet has been put in writing I don t have faith in the hospital as we are passed from one department to another trying to get result information https www patientopinion org uk opinions 219309 Similarly when staff fail to introduce themselves to patients surely the most basic of communication skills the result is a feeling that care is dehumanised or even dangerous Some trained nurses came to my room and administered IV antibiotics IV fluids without any introduction This made me feel very unsafe frightened and uncomfortable https www patientopinion org uk opinions 227140 About three quarters of stories on Patient Opinion receive a response from healthcare staff This provides a further opportunity to observe communication in action and learn from those who do it so well The core of good communication remains the same whether online or face to face listen first empathise be respectful Responding to a long story of care raising a number of concerns an ambulance service manager wrote You apologise for the length of your story but I found reading about your experience intriguing and extremely insightful Your story highlights so many areas for us to learn from https www patientopinion org uk opinions 223840 224697 And a member of CCG staff replying to a service user giving feedback about the mental health crisis service wrote Some of the concerns you have raised sound really bad and so I d like to check that you are ok and see if we can give you any other support you might need https www patientopinion org uk opinions 182221 202971 These kind of open welcoming and positive responses are the sorts of things you might say to a friend you cared about and a world away from the standardised your feedback is important to us Please contact PALS Communicating like this takes courage the courage to look inside yourself and ask the simple question If this were me what would I need to hear It s easy to think good communication and honest empathic relationships are an optional extra in healthcare nice to have but not as important as the complex sophisticated scientific interventions we now have available the things that work But increasingly I am convinced it is actually the human relationships of healthcare which are at the heart of creating hope and the possibility of healing Simple human communication has always been and still is the

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/news/blog/good-communication-is-at-the-root-of-humanity-in-healthcare-learning-from-patient-stories/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Blog - Picker Institute Europe
    Circles of Support collaboration Commissioning communication Community Mental Health Survey Cultural Change Dementia Election 2015 End of life care families Friends and Family Test Health and Social Care health and social care policy Healthcare Healthtalk org Healthwatch Oxfordshire Individual Clinician Feedback informed consent Inpatients Survey Internet Involvement ISQua Jeremy Corbyn Labour Labour Party Conference learning disabilities Long term Conditions maternity Maternity Survey Mental Health National Survey Programme NHS NHS England parents Partnerships patient experience Patient Experience Network Awards Patient feedback Patient Opinion PEN Person centred care Policy politics principles of patient centred care Quality Royal College Midwives Ruth Evans Safety self management service user feedback Shared Decision Making Sickle Cell Disorder Social Media Staff the King s Fund Transition Transparency Trends Waiting Times February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 October 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 Dr Andrew McCulloch Giuseppe Paparella Steve Sizmur Bridget Hopwood Steve Bough Chris Graham Phil Stylianides Amy Tallett Vincent Coole Amanda Attwood Sir Donald Irvine CBE MD FRCGP FRCP FMedSci Previous 2 of 2

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/blog/page/2/?tag=community-mental-health-survey (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Tackling mental health stigma is a key piece of the puzzle – but it’s not the only piece” - Dr Andrew McCulloch on the need for action in mental health care - Picker Institute Europe
    an overall government acknowledgement of the issue mental health has moved to a higher level of public consciousness in recent months The 2015 Community Mental Health Survey results supported understanding of people s experiences shining a stark light on the reality of care provision While the bulk of the results could be described as troubling at best the fact only 41 of people felt health professionals either always understood what is important to you in your life or always help you with what is important to you was particularly alarming The remaining 59 not agreeing with these statements is testament to the continued stigma and lack of understanding around mental health There is a prevailing myth it is something that happens to other people Service users are an anomaly and their needs hard to understand In reality a mental health service user s needs are fundamentally no different to those of any other service user and they are not so difficult to understand They want to be well and live well rounded satisfying lives and to be supported to do so despite their condition The truth is mental health is not a stand alone issue and eventually an end to stigma may have to coincide with an end to the dualistic model of health as mental and physical It does not need to be treated in isolation and it actually affects most people one way or another during their lives with over a third of general practice consultations having mental health elements to them This then leaves action which between funding cuts rising urgent care admissions and deteriorating survey results it s evident that there has not been much of Mental health funding and staffing adjustment are long overdue and would make a substantive difference however for tangible long term improvement to be achieved we must start to address the way mental health services are structured and delivered within the community understanding and focusing service goals in terms of supporting people to live their lives as they choose It s often said no one knows or understands their care needs more than patients themselves and the growing number of service user led and co designed services are clear evidence of this This was particularly apparent during my recent experience on the judging panel of the 2015 Positive Practice in Mental Health Awards which was both inspiring and eye opening The quality of the entries highlighted the desire to improve and unify services by sharing best practice and were a real reflection of an effective person centred approach in action Our category alone excellence in patient experience was inundated with entrants with 26 shortlisted for consideration many of which were service user led or included a focus on service user engagement Personal understanding means that the services and people running them are able to be highly really responsive to people s needs As countering the lack of understanding becomes less of an issue the challenge will be to move beyond understanding

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/news/blog/tackling-mental-health-stigma-is-a-key-piece-of-the-puzzle-but-its-not-the-only-piece-dr-andrew-mcculloch-on-the-need-for-action-in-mental-health-care/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • More people are having bad experiences of mental health care than positive" - Dr Andrew McCulloch on experiences of mental health care - Picker Institute Europe
    care they need or deserve Combine this with recent research from the We Need to Talk coalition which found as many as one in six people with mental health problems are attempting suicide whilst waiting to access core services and we can safely say there is cause for concern At a time when cuts to mental health services have been significant and emergency hospital admissions are higher than ever we are effectively stuck in a counterproductive cycle Patients wait too long for treatment their mental health deteriorating often leading to co morbid physical health problems and eventually resulting in increased hospital admissions Much needed funding and staffing adjustments can and will make a difference especially in areas such as waiting times for acute and crisis care However we must start to address the need for a change in the way mental health services are structured and delivered in the community if we are to see any sustainable improvements Currently we have a divide between the clinical agenda and what services users want and need from their care Health and social care leaders must be willing and able to provide services that alongside delivering therapies and treatments are socially inclusive delivering the emotional and life support that those living with mental health conditions require Voluntary sector organisations such as the Samaritans and the Citizens Advice Bureau offer a great source of expertise and support but currently are overburdened as they try to fill this divide By focusing services on helping people live their lives over just administering treatments and therapies when they struggle to do so we not only start to deliver more effective care but also realise efficiencies across health and social care systems A person centred approach does not necessarily require more funding it is not about doing more with more money or more staff although I am not denying the need for both of these more broadly it is about looking at the intelligence we have to do something different something better Using the results of national initiatives such as the NHS Community Mental Health Survey to measure peoples experiences alongside the intelligence gained by voluntary sector organisations we can better understand peoples needs and map services to them Whether a case worker who oversees and supports day to day living and medical concordance or a clinical team in an acute setting unlocking and responding to experiences of care is a critical part of improving care quality A mental health service that does not support and enable those working in it to shape care around the needs of those who depend on it cannot hope to deliver quality Until mental health services are systematically embedded with a person centred approach this cycle will continue to become more and more problematic crippling what could be a quality service into one that is inefficient not socially inclusive and essentially retrograde Tags Community Mental Health Survey Mental Health National Survey Programme NHS See Also Learning from dementia the difficulties it brings

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/news/blog/people-bad-experiences-mental-health-care-positive-dr-andrew-mcculloch-experiences-mental-health-care/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Are NHS complaints really ‘the tip of the iceberg’? - Picker Institute Europe
    in the future But of course not making a complaint doesn t necessarily equate to being content with your treatment It s quite possible that some people don t know how to complain don t get around to it or just don t feel able to speak up How do we account for these instances of poor care There are a couple of ways of approaching this One way is to ask people how often they report poor care This is exactly what Healthwatch England have done via a YouGov survey of 1 676 adults across England This found that that 30 of people had experienced or witnessed poor care within the last two years but that 61 of this group did not make a complaint about it They therefore estimate that roughly 250 000 people every year are not only failing to get the standard of treatment and care they expect but feel unable to make their voices heard 1 6 This calculation is problematic though for a number of reasons Firstly by asking people about both experiencing or witnessing poor care the survey creates double counting For example suppose my partner and I visited a relative in hospital and witnessed problems with their care If all three of us were surveyed we would each report having experienced or witnessed poor care but in practice it s not realistic that we would make three separate complaints Secondly calculating in this way makes the assumption that everything a person might consider as poor care is also something that they would judge worthy of a complaint This won t always be the case more than anything it will depend on how respondents interpret poor care which could range from anything that could ve been better right through to nothing less than incidents causing serious risk of harm If we assume that at least some of the instances of poor care reported are ones that the respondents did not feel would merit a complaint for whatever reason then the estimate of the number of people unable to complain is again overstated What other methods could we use to investigate this issue One would be to ask people who had recently used care services if they had ever wanted to make a complaint We did this on behalf of the Healthcare Commission in the national NHS adult inpatient survey from 2007 to 2010 and found a steady 7 8 of recently discharged inpatients said that they did want to complain about the care they received in hospital 7 Given that there are 12 million completed inpatient episodes per year this suggests somewhere in the region of 900 000 people every year wanted to complain about their hospital care a much higher estimate than described above and more than 26 times higher than the actual number of written complaints about inpatient care reported by HSCIC But we can t infer that only 1 in 26 people who want to make a complaint go on

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/news/blog/nhs-complaints-really-tip-iceberg/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Learning from dementia - the difficulties it brings, the moment care of the condition changed, and what’s next for those affected… - Picker Institute Europe
    one of the greatest mysteries of our age Without memory we are nothing and no one The gradual recession of the knowledge that defines us is as unimaginable as it is distressing But it is not the case that without memory we are nothing and no one a person forgetting is not a person forgotten Every sufferer of dementia is an expressive experiencing individual For this reason the progression of dementia is very difficult for everyone involved The inability to recall the recent past associated with the first stage of Alzheimer s is followed by further deterioration of memory It s an illness of confusion layered on confusion Its very causes can create in the sufferer not just distressing symptoms but an amplified struggle with those symptoms and that distress So what has been shown to help when the individuals involved are struggling How do we learn to live with dementia It was Thomas Kitwood who turned the treatment of dementia on its head in his publication Dementia Reconsidered The Person Comes First by putting the person before the disease As Kitwood powerfully put it in his 1997 introduction T he history of science seems to show that when the anomalies become too glaring there will be some who try to frame the problems in a different way the time for a new paradigm has come The principle of this book then is to take up this challenge and present a paradigm in which the person comes first Central to this person first approach is Kitwood s Dementia Care Mapping a crucial tool in the understanding and treatment of dementia DCM is a way to learn about the emotional landscape of a person At the core of DCM is time spent with the dementia sufferer observing their reactions The patient s response to all sorts of situations is noted Moments are marked as increasing or decreasing wellbeing and personhood The method is simple effective and approved NICE has recommended person centred dementia care since 2006 Kitwood described the approach as a serious attempt to take the standpoint of a person with dementia using a combination of empathy and observational skill Observation by observation a picture of life through the patient s eyes is painted As the people around the patient learn the little things that help their own tasks can become easier This means if used well this kind of person specific observational treatment empowers carers to relearn the person they feel they are losing Kitwood s personal aim was to understand as far as possible what care is like from the standpoint of the person with dementia Listening to and learning from people with dementia shapes the quality of future care Sadly there s not a lot of user experience data around dementia care The Picker Institute would love to work towards developing observational tools as part of care visits measuring the experience of the patient in order to improve the experience of dementia Tags Dementia Mental Health See

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/news/blog/learning-dementia-difficulties-brings-moment-care-condition-changed-whats-next-affected/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive



  •