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  • Ruth Evans, PEN shares her 10 steps to delivering high quality maternity care to parents with learning disabilities - Page 6 of 11 - Picker Institute Europe
    learning disabilities 14 January 2016 Visual is better Never underestimate the power of images CHANGE have created a series of fantastic resources in easy read format and a number of supporting images Often a single image can convey the same message as a paragraph of text A clear shot of a woman breast feeding holding or changing a baby can provide all mothers with helpful tips for taking care of their child Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Next Tags learning disabilities maternity parents patient experience Person centred care See Also Parents views of neonatal care must continue to drive improvements Caroline Davey Chief Executive Bliss For any parent having their baby admitted to a neonatal unit is a hugely traumatic experience Being launched in many cases quite unexpectedly from happy preparations for a new arrival into the alien and highly medicalised world of neonatal care is incredibly stressful It s vital that parents are 30 March 2015 These improvements are testament to the impact that a rise in midwife numbers can have Cathy Warwick CEO RCM on NHS Maternity Survey 2015 results I always look forward to reading the Care Quality Commission s

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/news/blog/3205/6/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Ruth Evans, PEN shares her 10 steps to delivering high quality maternity care to parents with learning disabilities - Page 7 of 11 - Picker Institute Europe
    January Ruth Evans Patient Experience Network PEN See all by Author Ruth Evans PEN shares her 10 steps to delivering high quality maternity care to parents with learning disabilities 14 January 2016 Support with loss While I am aware that providing bereavement support in a maternity environment is at the very least challenging I have been genuinely and completely shocked by the lack of support and compassion for parents with learning disabilities who have had their babies taken away from them Losing the right to care for a child and to see them when you want to is a form of grief that requires attention and counselling just like any other loss If this care is not available on a maternity ward then one way to enable this access would be to move the mother to another ward that can provide some level of counselling Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Next Tags learning disabilities maternity parents patient experience Person centred care See Also Parents views of neonatal care must continue to drive improvements Caroline Davey Chief Executive Bliss For any parent having their baby admitted to a neonatal unit is a hugely traumatic experience Being launched in many cases quite unexpectedly from happy preparations for a new arrival into the alien and highly medicalised world of neonatal care is incredibly stressful It s vital that parents are 30 March 2015 These improvements are testament to the impact that a rise in midwife numbers can have Cathy Warwick CEO RCM on NHS Maternity Survey 2015 results I always look forward to reading the Care Quality Commission s periodic national maternity surveys They help all of us involved in NHS maternity care in England to pause and reflect on the experiences of thousands of women

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/news/blog/3205/7/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Ruth Evans, PEN shares her 10 steps to delivering high quality maternity care to parents with learning disabilities - Page 8 of 11 - Picker Institute Europe
    learning disabilities People tend to be categorised as one group despite the fact that there conditions range from mild to severe Some people who can t read or write for example are actually incredibly eloquent and capable in other ways It s about tailoring care to the wants and needs of the individual not necessarily the condition The key to awareness is training and shared knowledge which in itself could be very difficult to provide People with learning disabilities represent a small proportion of maternity service users so training staff in the best ways to care for them may not be a first priority but that does not make these peoples experiences or needs any less valid Certain attitudes and behaviours such as shouting or talking too fast will damage relationships with people with learning disabilities not enable them It s about delivering the best possible care full stop And at the moment for parents with learning disabilities at least that just is not happening There are some great resources out there for professionals to draw from including Inclusive Support for Parents with a Learning Disability Being a Parent Buckinghamshire Interagency Protocol working with Parents with Learning Disability Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Next Tags learning disabilities maternity parents patient experience Person centred care See Also Parents views of neonatal care must continue to drive improvements Caroline Davey Chief Executive Bliss For any parent having their baby admitted to a neonatal unit is a hugely traumatic experience Being launched in many cases quite unexpectedly from happy preparations for a new arrival into the alien and highly medicalised world of neonatal care is incredibly stressful It s vital that parents are 30 March 2015 These improvements are testament to the impact that a rise

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/news/blog/3205/8/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Ruth Evans, PEN shares her 10 steps to delivering high quality maternity care to parents with learning disabilities - Page 9 of 11 - Picker Institute Europe
    to parents with learning disabilities 14 January 2016 It s the little things Most of the suggestions above are neither costly or massively hard to achieve they just take a little time and consideration to get right There are some fantastic examples of this approach in action with midwives and professionals doing simple things like taking photos of how to hold the bottle or the baby or how to breastfeed and giving the images to parents to put on the fridge so that they can refer to and learn from them at home When done well the impact for service users is phenomenal She kept telling me off until she found out about my disability Then she was very nice to me and a lot more understanding My midwife was really caring I could not fault her I would like to have had the same midwife all the way through The consultant explained the caesarean very well Barnado s did parenting classes in the home they were very helpful Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Next Tags learning disabilities maternity parents patient experience Person centred care See Also Parents views of neonatal care must continue to drive improvements Caroline Davey Chief Executive Bliss For any parent having their baby admitted to a neonatal unit is a hugely traumatic experience Being launched in many cases quite unexpectedly from happy preparations for a new arrival into the alien and highly medicalised world of neonatal care is incredibly stressful It s vital that parents are 30 March 2015 These improvements are testament to the impact that a rise in midwife numbers can have Cathy Warwick CEO RCM on NHS Maternity Survey 2015 results I always look forward to reading the Care Quality Commission s periodic national maternity

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/news/blog/3205/9/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Ruth Evans, PEN shares her 10 steps to delivering high quality maternity care to parents with learning disabilities - Page 10 of 11 - Picker Institute Europe
    seen by the same healthcare professional if we could and have the opportunity to form longstanding trust based relationships But in reality and a short staffed resource constrained NHS it s just not very realistic Delivering continuity of care doesn t necessarily mean seeing the same Doctor or midwife though it s about offering a consistent approach and reinforcing messages at every appointment We found evidence of people receiving very mixed signals and conflicting advice which left them uneasy Deeply confusing for any service user let alone someone with learning disabilities for whom clear simple communication is key Hospital passports are widely used now particularly at Northumbria NHS Foundation Trust and allow healthcare professionals to have easy access to key information about service users with learning disabilities including things they need to know about them things that are important to them and their likes and dislikes and how they liked to be communicated with The nurse mumbles she is not English and uses big words I do not understand When I had my second child I forgot all the signs the midwife assumed I remembered everything No one told me how painful it would be Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Next Tags learning disabilities maternity parents patient experience Person centred care See Also Parents views of neonatal care must continue to drive improvements Caroline Davey Chief Executive Bliss For any parent having their baby admitted to a neonatal unit is a hugely traumatic experience Being launched in many cases quite unexpectedly from happy preparations for a new arrival into the alien and highly medicalised world of neonatal care is incredibly stressful It s vital that parents are 30 March 2015 These improvements are testament to the impact that a rise in midwife numbers

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/news/blog/3205/10/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Ruth Evans, PEN shares her 10 steps to delivering high quality maternity care to parents with learning disabilities - Page 11 of 11 - Picker Institute Europe
    of the best results come from collaboration By connecting with another service you might find that they are already doing something that you want to do really well Saving you lots of unnecessary work and also helping to build new relationships It s not necessary to reinvent the wheel if something works don t ignore it find a way to make it work for you Above all it is really important to be open minded and consider how developments and knowledge from other services and care areas can be transferred and applied to your needs For example as you can see from this list there s some great progress being made in maternity learning disability and general care services that when drawn from and combined supports quality maternity experiences for people with learning disabilities People with learning disabilities want the same thing as any other maternity service user a positive experience and great care So the reverse can also apply and each of these steps can fit to general maternity services as well If we work together share knowledge and keep service user needs at the heart of everything we do we can support the delivery of great care and positive experiences across the board Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Next Tags learning disabilities maternity parents patient experience Person centred care See Also Parents views of neonatal care must continue to drive improvements Caroline Davey Chief Executive Bliss For any parent having their baby admitted to a neonatal unit is a hugely traumatic experience Being launched in many cases quite unexpectedly from happy preparations for a new arrival into the alien and highly medicalised world of neonatal care is incredibly stressful It s vital that parents are 30 March 2015 These improvements are

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/news/blog/3205/11/ (2016-02-12)
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  • "Parents’ views of neonatal care must continue to drive improvements" - Caroline Davey, Chief Executive, Bliss - Picker Institute Europe
    unit as much as they wanted 91 per cent said they were able to see their baby as soon as they wanted after admission to the unit and 87 per cent said they always or nearly always had confidence and trust in the staff caring for their baby all absolutely crucial for parents at such an anxious time There is also clear evidence of support for parents to play a full role in caring for their baby with high scores for a number of aspects of family centred care which research tells us is so important to deliver improved health outcomes for babies 81 per cent of parents surveyed said that staff definitely helped them feel confident in caring for their baby and the same proportion said they were definitely involved as much as they wanted in the day to day care of their baby such as nappy changing and feeding However in other areas there is further work to do to ensure that all parents have the opportunity to be involved in every aspect of their baby s care for example while 72 per cent of parents said they were always or nearly always allowed to be present when their baby was being discussed during a ward round 12 per cent said they were not allowed into these critical discussions Most importantly while 60 per cent of parents said they definitely had as much skin to skin contact with their baby as they wanted and a further 22 per cent said they did to some extent one in six 16 per cent said they did not and this despite clear evidence that skin to skin contact is one of the most powerful ways that parents can support their baby s health At Bliss we work closely with health professionals and neonatal units to support service improvement and in particular we seek to support units to increase their involvement of parents in the delivery their baby s care Our Bliss Baby Charter sets out seven core standards which summarise the care respect and support that vulnerable babies and their parents should receive while in hospital The accompanying audit tool and accreditation process are designed to assist hospital staff in assessing how well they are delivering against these standards These survey findings reinforce the value of this work and the need for Bliss to redouble our efforts to work with more neonatal units This will ensure that all are able to access our support and in turn that all parents are supported to be fully involved in their baby s care whichever neonatal unit they are in There is challenge too for Bliss in some of the lowest scoring areas of the survey 30 per cent of parents surveyed said they did not get any information about parent support groups such as Bliss over a third 37 per cent said they did not receive any or not enough written information to help them understand their baby s condition and treatment and

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/news/blog/parents-views-of-neonatal-care-must-continue-to-drive-improvements-caroline-davey-chief-executive-bliss/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Small problems in health and care, can be prevented from becoming big ones, by addressing them in a prompt and rehabilitative way - Carol Christensen-Moore - Picker Institute Europe
    care professionals and in turn the quality of care being delivered The study findings go some way towards bridging the gap between staff experiences professional competency and healthcare managers comprehension of the relationship between the two Providing the High level data and insight needed for managers to understand respect and respond to their feedback Our research uncovered a very nuanced and fluid understanding of competence amongst practitioners and stakeholders When it came to the impact of engagement versus disengagement on staff competence there wasn t a consensus as to a link between the two Though participants in the study saw potential for disengagement to lead to mistakes or incompetent practice they thought this would be unlikely They did agree however that a disengaged professional was unlikely to be going the extra mile Triggers for disengagement Triggers for disengagement and external threats to competence reported by participants were strikingly similar By far the most reported threat to competency cited by participants were workload pressures or dysfunctional teams and management systems Workload pressures Operating outside scope of practice Under utilising skills Professional isolation Lack of autonomy Lack of support for CPD Poor or infrequent supervision Poor management Dysfunctional relationships Personal circumstances bereavement divorce financial pressures Blame culture Working patterns Possible ways of preventing problems Patients professionals and stakeholders also reported very similar ways of preventing small problems from becoming big problems including access to clinical supervision and specialist assistance when required professional networks and reflective practice Being valued Good team dynamics Good supervision Regular appraisal and performance management Buddying schemes Mentoring Preceptorship Team building exercises Professional networks Reflective practice Self awareness Keeping up to date No blame culture The study s observations surrounding triggers for disengagement and how to minimise a problem s impact not only stimulate debate around the role of

    Original URL path: http://www.pickereurope.org/news/blog/preventing-small-problems-becoming-big-problems-health-care/ (2016-02-12)
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