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  • How Young Children Draw People II | Carle Museum
    are an outgrowth of much previous work But these figures are often the first ones to interest the adult who is unaware of what has gone before Kellogg p 1 Her idea is that children move themselves without instruction through four stages of drawing The pattern stage starting at 2 years or younger includes Basic Scribbles and Placement Patterns The shape stage starting around 2 3 yrs is followed closely by efforts to combine shapes Around 3 4 years the design stage is marked by balanced combinations of lines and shapes such as Mandalas Suns and Radials By about age 5 children are likely to have started creating pictorial work such as humans animals plants and buildings Analyzing Children s Art 1969 p 39 So I m curious At what age did your child start scribbling Did they move through Kellogg s stages of scribbling development When did they start drawing humans Did you encourage their scribbling at home How The drawings above were left behind by visitors to the studio this week I didn t meet their creators but If I had to guess their ages based on Kellogg s theory I think the top one was done by a 3 yr old and the bottom by a 5 year old by Meghan Burch Tags figure drawing rhoda kellogg scribbling This entry was posted on Saturday August 20th 2011 at 1 57 pm and is filed under By Meghan Burch Drawing Infants and Toddlers Preschool You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2 0 feed You can leave a response or trackback from your own site Leave a reply Your name Mail will not be published Website Share CAPTCHA This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions Melissa says February 12 2016 at 2 15pm Mine is 7 now and enjoys things that move like airplanes His pictures have always been about things happening volcanos balls trucks rockets There were people in the things usualy family but the story was about stuff happening even when he was younger His drawings reflected stories we read or toys he imagined in stories the drawing have evolved as his coordination has grown the stories have always been wonderfully full of detail even if the drawings were more basic reply meghanb says February 12 2016 at 2 15pm Thanks for sharing Melissa reply Contributors Meghan Burch Diana MacKenzie Categories About This Blog 1 Bookmaking 24 By Diana MacKenzie 76 By Meghan Burch 63 Classes 22 Collage 66 Displays Window Shades 11 Drawing 50 Elementary School 97 Every Day Art Program 63 Found Materials 48 High School 25 Homemade Materials and Tools 16 Infants and Toddlers 47 Internship Program 25 Light 12 Middle School 33 Mixed Media 66 Nature 46 Our Approach 22 Our Favorite Materials 10 Outreach 23 Painting 57 Paper 37 Preschool 81 Printmaking 39 Professional Development 29 Resources 5 Sculpture 44 Space to Create 2 Special

    Original URL path: http://www.picturebookart.org/blogs/making-art/how-young-children-draw-people-ii (2016-02-12)
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  • Making Art | Carle Museum
    Watercolor Portraits August 10th 2011 Share We re gearing up for the new Public Art Project in The Art Studio and we can t wait to see visitors Swish Dab and Wiggle some paint around READ MORE Flower Drawings August 5th 2011 Share Summer is a great time of year to draw some flora and fauna from observation READ MORE Pages first previous 1 2 Contributors Meghan Burch Diana MacKenzie Categories About This Blog 1 Bookmaking 24 By Diana MacKenzie 76 By Meghan Burch 63 Classes 22 Collage 66 Displays Window Shades 11 Drawing 50 Elementary School 97 Every Day Art Program 63 Found Materials 48 High School 25 Homemade Materials and Tools 16 Infants and Toddlers 47 Internship Program 25 Light 12 Middle School 33 Mixed Media 66 Nature 46 Our Approach 22 Our Favorite Materials 10 Outreach 23 Painting 57 Paper 37 Preschool 81 Printmaking 39 Professional Development 29 Resources 5 Sculpture 44 Space to Create 2 Special Events 90 Special Guests and Artist Visits 34 Archive February 2016 1 January 2016 1 December 2015 4 November 2015 3 October 2015 2 September 2015 2 August 2015 4 July 2015 3 June 2015 3 May 2015 1 April 2015 2 March 2015 3 February 2015 4 January 2015 1 December 2014 2 November 2014 4 October 2014 5 September 2014 10 August 2014 2 July 2014 3 June 2014 4 May 2014 3 April 2014 4 March 2014 6 February 2014 5 January 2014 6 November 2013 1 October 2013 5 September 2013 5 August 2013 5 July 2013 5 June 2013 7 May 2013 5 April 2013 7 March 2013 7 February 2013 4 January 2013 3 December 2012 6 November 2012 5 October 2012 6 September 2012 5 August 2012 9 July 2012 8 June 2012

    Original URL path: http://www.picturebookart.org/blogs/making-art/archive/201108?page=1 (2016-02-12)
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  • The Teacher as Researcher | Carle Museum
    of fun to think of new ideas for classes selecting art materials choosing picture books to read and art work to visit in the galleries Children remind me to look beyond what s right in front of me wonder how and why and imagine a world of endless possibilities My job is to listen to their questions and encourage their discoveries Below is a wonderful quote from the article The Teacher as Researcher by Carlina Rinaldi where she sums up the joys of working with children All children are intelligent different from each other and unpredictable If we know how to listen to them children can give back to us the pleasure of amazement of marvel of doubt the pleasure of why Children can give us the strength of doubt and the courage of error They can transmit to us the joy of searching and researching the value of research as an openness to others and toward everything new that is produced by the encounter with others Carlina s full article can be found on p 3 of Innovations in Early Education the International Reggio Exchange Spring 03 issue What does this quote mean to you Share a time when a child has changed your perspective or taught you something new by Diana MacKenzie Tags This entry was posted on Sunday July 31st 2011 at 3 09 pm and is filed under By Diana MacKenzie Classes Our Approach Professional Development You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2 0 feed You can leave a response or trackback from your own site Leave a reply Your name Mail will not be published Website Share CAPTCHA This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions Contributors Meghan Burch Diana MacKenzie Categories About This Blog 1 Bookmaking 24 By Diana MacKenzie 76 By Meghan Burch 63 Classes 22 Collage 66 Displays Window Shades 11 Drawing 50 Elementary School 97 Every Day Art Program 63 Found Materials 48 High School 25 Homemade Materials and Tools 16 Infants and Toddlers 47 Internship Program 25 Light 12 Middle School 33 Mixed Media 66 Nature 46 Our Approach 22 Our Favorite Materials 10 Outreach 23 Painting 57 Paper 37 Preschool 81 Printmaking 39 Professional Development 29 Resources 5 Sculpture 44 Space to Create 2 Special Events 90 Special Guests and Artist Visits 34 Archive February 2016 1 January 2016 1 December 2015 4 November 2015 3 October 2015 2 September 2015 2 August 2015 4 July 2015 3 June 2015 3 May 2015 1 April 2015 2 March 2015 3 February 2015 4 January 2015 1 December 2014 2 November 2014 4 October 2014 5 September 2014 10 August 2014 2 July 2014 3 June 2014 4 May 2014 3 April 2014 4 March 2014 6 February 2014 5 January 2014 6 November 2013 1 October 2013 5 September 2013 5 August 2013 5 July 2013 5 June 2013 7 May 2013 5

    Original URL path: http://www.picturebookart.org/blogs/making-art/teacher-researcher (2016-02-12)
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  • Watercolor Wash Collage Papers | Carle Museum
    you ll need for this project Color diffusing paper or coffee filter paper Magic markers not permanent markers Liquid watercolors Spray bottles filled with water or liquid watercolors Clothes line or place to dry wet papers Visitors started in The Studio drawing pictures with magic markers onto color diffusing paper very similar to coffee filters The next step was bring the drawings outside and get them all wet Using a variety of liquid watercolors in spray bottles and pipettes to add colors The magic markers and watercolors mixed together and created beautiful washy designs We hung the wet papers in the sunshine and in a little while they were dry ready to be cut and made into collages The paper we used for this project was donated to us on a giant roll from a mystery source but you could get similar effects from coffee filter paper or prepackaged color diffusing papers from any art supply catalog Once this type of light weight paper is dry it is thin enough to be cut and glued using just liquid starch glue Combine handmade papers with store bought tissue papers at home to create unique collages cards or gifts What s your family s favorite outdoor art project by Diana MacKenzie Tags eric carle activity eric carle theme special sunday tissue paper collage Art Studio Internship Program This entry was posted on Thursday July 28th 2011 at 8 21 am and is filed under By Diana MacKenzie Special Events Collage Elementary School Every Day Art Program High School Infants and Toddlers Middle School Painting Paper Preschool You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2 0 feed You can leave a response or trackback from your own site Leave a reply Your name Mail will not be published Website Share CAPTCHA This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions Contributors Meghan Burch Diana MacKenzie Categories About This Blog 1 Bookmaking 24 By Diana MacKenzie 76 By Meghan Burch 63 Classes 22 Collage 66 Displays Window Shades 11 Drawing 50 Elementary School 97 Every Day Art Program 63 Found Materials 48 High School 25 Homemade Materials and Tools 16 Infants and Toddlers 47 Internship Program 25 Light 12 Middle School 33 Mixed Media 66 Nature 46 Our Approach 22 Our Favorite Materials 10 Outreach 23 Painting 57 Paper 37 Preschool 81 Printmaking 39 Professional Development 29 Resources 5 Sculpture 44 Space to Create 2 Special Events 90 Special Guests and Artist Visits 34 Archive February 2016 1 January 2016 1 December 2015 4 November 2015 3 October 2015 2 September 2015 2 August 2015 4 July 2015 3 June 2015 3 May 2015 1 April 2015 2 March 2015 3 February 2015 4 January 2015 1 December 2014 2 November 2014 4 October 2014 5 September 2014 10 August 2014 2 July 2014 3 June 2014 4 May 2014 3 April 2014 4 March 2014 6 February 2014 5

    Original URL path: http://www.picturebookart.org/blogs/making-art/watercolor-wash-collage-papers (2016-02-12)
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  • New Public Art Project - Tissue Paper Collage | Carle Museum
    this month s Special Sunday There will be an additional art activity in the back of The Studio and in the apple orchard weather permitting between 1 00 and 4 00pm Happy collaging by Diana MacKenzie Tags eric carle eric carle activity eric carle theme liquid starch tissue paper collage This entry was posted on Monday July 18th 2011 at 11 55 am and is filed under By Diana MacKenzie Special Events Collage Elementary School Every Day Art Program Preschool You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2 0 feed You can leave a response or trackback from your own site Leave a reply Your name Mail will not be published Website Share CAPTCHA This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions Penelope says February 12 2016 at 2 16pm I was there on Saturday with my daughter and we made a tissue paper collage She had so much fun and we also loved seeing the new colors that came about as a result of the layering of different tissue papers I highly recommend going to the Carle with family It s a special place reply dianam says February 12 2016 at 2 16pm Hi Penelope Thank you for sharing your experience working with materials in The Studio with your daughter The color mixing effect by layering tissue papers is best achieved by working with both bleeding and non bleeding tissue papers We always keep both on hand and they are available in most art supply catalogs and online You may find that the bleeding tissues come in a more vibrant array of colors We hope you make it back to The Carle soon reply Contributors Meghan Burch Diana MacKenzie Categories About This Blog 1 Bookmaking 24 By Diana MacKenzie 76 By Meghan Burch 63 Classes 22 Collage 66 Displays Window Shades 11 Drawing 50 Elementary School 97 Every Day Art Program 63 Found Materials 48 High School 25 Homemade Materials and Tools 16 Infants and Toddlers 47 Internship Program 25 Light 12 Middle School 33 Mixed Media 66 Nature 46 Our Approach 22 Our Favorite Materials 10 Outreach 23 Painting 57 Paper 37 Preschool 81 Printmaking 39 Professional Development 29 Resources 5 Sculpture 44 Space to Create 2 Special Events 90 Special Guests and Artist Visits 34 Archive February 2016 1 January 2016 1 December 2015 4 November 2015 3 October 2015 2 September 2015 2 August 2015 4 July 2015 3 June 2015 3 May 2015 1 April 2015 2 March 2015 3 February 2015 4 January 2015 1 December 2014 2 November 2014 4 October 2014 5 September 2014 10 August 2014 2 July 2014 3 June 2014 4 May 2014 3 April 2014 4 March 2014 6 February 2014 5 January 2014 6 November 2013 1 October 2013 5 September 2013 5 August 2013 5 July 2013 5 June 2013 7 May 2013 5 April 2013 7 March 2013 7 February

    Original URL path: http://www.picturebookart.org/blogs/making-art/new-public-art-project-tissue-paper-collage (2016-02-12)
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  • Special Sunday - Shadow Play | Carle Museum
    cut and glued black paper shapes over their rubbings to make layered designs To learn more about upcoming events at The Carle including Special Sundays in the Studio click here by Diana MacKenzie Tags special sunday Art Studio Internship Program This entry was posted on Wednesday June 29th 2011 at 12 47 pm and is filed under By Diana MacKenzie Special Events Collage Drawing Elementary School Every Day Art Program Paper You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2 0 feed You can leave a response or trackback from your own site Leave a reply Your name Mail will not be published Website Share CAPTCHA This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions Contributors Meghan Burch Diana MacKenzie Categories About This Blog 1 Bookmaking 24 By Diana MacKenzie 76 By Meghan Burch 63 Classes 22 Collage 66 Displays Window Shades 11 Drawing 50 Elementary School 97 Every Day Art Program 63 Found Materials 48 High School 25 Homemade Materials and Tools 16 Infants and Toddlers 47 Internship Program 25 Light 12 Middle School 33 Mixed Media 66 Nature 46 Our Approach 22 Our Favorite Materials 10 Outreach 23 Painting 57 Paper 37 Preschool 81 Printmaking 39 Professional Development 29 Resources 5 Sculpture 44 Space to Create 2 Special Events 90 Special Guests and Artist Visits 34 Archive February 2016 1 January 2016 1 December 2015 4 November 2015 3 October 2015 2 September 2015 2 August 2015 4 July 2015 3 June 2015 3 May 2015 1 April 2015 2 March 2015 3 February 2015 4 January 2015 1 December 2014 2 November 2014 4 October 2014 5 September 2014 10 August 2014 2 July 2014 3 June 2014 4 May 2014 3 April 2014

    Original URL path: http://www.picturebookart.org/blogs/making-art/special-sunday-shadow-play (2016-02-12)
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  • How to Melt Crayons | Carle Museum
    different shapes Please note that since this process involves the oven and hot wax I usually complete it by myself If you want children to join in you could have them peel off the papers and sort them in the tins My favorite ways to sort are by temperature warm colors cool colors and color families reds blues oranges etc In my next experiment I m going to try melting the black and white pieces together Happy drawing by Meghan Burch Tags broken crayons how to melting rainbow recycling This entry was posted on Wednesday June 29th 2011 at 12 29 pm and is filed under By Meghan Burch Drawing You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2 0 feed You can leave a response or trackback from your own site Leave a reply Your name Mail will not be published Website Share CAPTCHA This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions Andrew A Sailer says February 12 2016 at 2 16pm Cool Site Thanks For Showing Us reply Leslie says February 12 2016 at 2 16pm I m partial to these crayons shaped like veggies and fruits on etsy http www etsy com listing 74207753 farmers market soy crayons handmade all ref v1 other 1 Shows you how much fun different molds could be reply meghanb says February 12 2016 at 2 16pm Leslie those farmers market crayons look like great fun Thanks for sharing the link reply Lori says February 12 2016 at 2 16pm Can t wait to do this with my heart shaped mini muffin tins And maybe even our underused madeline baking tin should be fun reply meghanb says February 12 2016 at 2 16pm Ooh A madeline tin is a great idea reply katie says February 12 2016 at 2 16pm Very cool Can you use cupcake wrappers to line the tin with or will that not work reply meghanb says February 12 2016 at 2 16pm Hi Katie I haven t tried it but moms and others on the internet have without complaint of liners sticking to the crayons Let me know if you try it Better yet send photos Good luck reply Angie P says February 12 2016 at 2 16pm I just used a metal muffin tin with paper liners The crayons came off of the liners without difficulty but unfortunately some of the crayon wax leeched through the liners and onto my pan Next time I will opt for metallic liners They re very pretty though reply Alicia Lavis says February 12 2016 at 2 16pm After the crayon melt I put the liquid in animal shaped jelly box so I get animal shaped crayon reply meghanb says February 12 2016 at 2 16pm Yes I ve seen some neat crayon shapes What s a jelly box I m not familiar with what that is reply Karlene Bellize says February 12 2016 at 2 16pm

    Original URL path: http://www.picturebookart.org/blogs/making-art/how-melt-crayons (2016-02-12)
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  • Making Art and Dance Together | Carle Museum
    and is filed under By Meghan Burch Special Events Classes Elementary School Painting Preschool You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2 0 feed You can leave a response or trackback from your own site Leave a reply Your name Mail will not be published Website Share CAPTCHA This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions ashley says February 12 2016 at 2 17pm Looks like fun Do you have any classes for toddlers 2 yr olds reply meghanb says February 12 2016 at 2 17pm We don t currently have classes for 2 yr olds in the Art Studio but check back later I m hoping to run some materials play sessions for 1 and 2 yr olds in the winter reply Contributors Meghan Burch Diana MacKenzie Categories About This Blog 1 Bookmaking 24 By Diana MacKenzie 76 By Meghan Burch 63 Classes 22 Collage 66 Displays Window Shades 11 Drawing 50 Elementary School 97 Every Day Art Program 63 Found Materials 48 High School 25 Homemade Materials and Tools 16 Infants and Toddlers 47 Internship Program 25 Light 12 Middle School 33 Mixed Media 66 Nature 46 Our Approach 22 Our Favorite Materials 10 Outreach 23 Painting 57 Paper 37 Preschool 81 Printmaking 39 Professional Development 29 Resources 5 Sculpture 44 Space to Create 2 Special Events 90 Special Guests and Artist Visits 34 Archive February 2016 1 January 2016 1 December 2015 4 November 2015 3 October 2015 2 September 2015 2 August 2015 4 July 2015 3 June 2015 3 May 2015 1 April 2015 2 March 2015 3 February 2015 4 January 2015 1 December 2014 2 November 2014 4 October 2014 5 September 2014 10 August 2014 2 July

    Original URL path: http://www.picturebookart.org/blogs/making-art/making-art-and-dance-together (2016-02-12)
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