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  • Making Every Minute Count: How PIs Can Fit 28 Hours Into a 24-Hour Day | Principal Investigators Association
    scientist You must manage your lab write grant applications and do research all in the same day Learn the valuable methods and tips to gaining control over your day with this how to expert advice Conquer the time wasters that are slowing you down and make every minute count This Time Management Pack includes a 45 pg special report plus a 60 minute On Demand Webinar Special Report a 199 value Making Every Minute Count How to Fit 28 Hours into a 24 Hour Day Take the first step and get this easy to read time management survival guide with over 45 pages of the valuable methods and expert tips to gaining control over your day Become a master of these skills and say goodbye to being stretched too thin Managing multiple priorities Turn every 24 hour day into a 28 hour day by getting more done Identify and eliminate time wasters Recognize and overcome productivity blocks Defragment your day by overcoming the disorganization Define priorities and follow through to keep research moving Tips on brainstorming for time saving ideas how to get your team involved Available in digital format PDF On Demand Webinar a 197 value Making Every Minute Count How to Fit 28 Hours into a 24 Hour Day You are pulled in all directions from finishing an experiment to writing test questions to mentoring a postdoc How often do you find yourself running out of time Weekly daily hourly For most busy scientist it seems there is never enough time in the day 5 Key Take Aways The ability to delegate demonstrates effective leadership Allocating responsibilities results in higher productivity Handing over tasks is critical for managing talented people in a lab environment Most science professionals crave challenges and more autonomy Letting go slowly will improve your

    Original URL path: https://principalinvestigators.org/product/making-every-minute-count-how-pis-can-fit-28-hours-into-a-24-hour-day/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Educational Pack: How to Conduct Effective Research with Undergraduate Students | Principal Investigators Association
    of the biggest benefits are from having undergrads in your lab and apply these recruiting startegies to ensure you find the best talent for your research Your educational pack includes these 2 must have products Executive Report Conduct Effective Research with Undergraduate Students PDF a 199 value Undergrads have the distinct advantage of having minds free from the kinds of pre cut answers that we all acquire in our twenties and thirties and they are perfectly willing to ask the kind of naive questions that will either probe your unspoken assumptions or point out places where you may have skipped steps in your reasoning as you set up the problem you seek to address says Dr Thomas Blackburn PhD co author of this report The biggest benefit to you of having undergrads working in your lab is the big career boost you ll enjoy Your mentorship of undergrads is yet another credibility building and distinguished facet of your career as a leader and scientist As you know from your own early years as a student good mentorship often plays a deciding role in the careers of the most innovative and productive scientists and science faculty Blackburn notes Inside this 30 pg executive report you will find insider advice for How to Manage Undergrads What s Different the Same pg 6 Choosing the Right Research Project pg 10 Get Your Project Funded with Special Grant pg 16 Recruiting Strategies Attract Talented Undergrad pg 22 Examples of Undergrad Summer Research Programs pg 27 And More 60 Minute On Demand Webinar Beyond the Grad Student Teaching Undergraduates Through Research a 197 value Undergraduate research is a field of its own experts say and you shouldn t enter it as a second choice to the R01 environment So what s so different between the

    Original URL path: https://principalinvestigators.org/product/undergraduatepack/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Principal Investigators Association
    NIH grant application you must map out your basic strategy One core element of your overall approach is defining the scope of your project Climb the mountain When considering your proposal s scope think of your project as a mountain climbing expedition and the grant as a plan for the climb In this metaphor reaching the summit stands for answering the principal research question driving your work And like climbing a mountain there may be multiple routes to the summit Your Specific Aims represent the potential routes to the summit and collectively they describe the project s scope When choosing each route consider what technical approaches you have immediate access to and what additional ones potential collaborators might bring to the research You may also have to predict whether you can reach the mountain in four to five years or if it will take 10 But this doesn t mean that you should reject all research questions that might take 10 years to address definitively Choosing a 10 year question is not necessarily a fatal flaw if you can convince reviewers that the waypoint you hope to reach in 4 5 years will still pay scientific benefits to people outside your immediate scientific community You may even win points for being realistic Essentially scope strictly defines the extent of science you hope to accomplish during the proposed award period Fixing your application s scale early is a critical aspect of grantsmanship because you have to strike the correct balance between proposing enough work to achieve significant impact is the mountain high enough and not suggesting so much that reviewers think you overly ambitious too many routes or won t get high enough to make a difference How broad should scope be Keep in mind also that your expedition has a fixed budget that will allow you to hire only a set number of climbers This means you have to think carefully about the routes the Specific Aims for your personnel Your scope should move the field forward up the mountain rather than sideways If other researchers have made an interesting observation in your field in one organism don t assume that reviewers will be excited if you simply attempt to validate the same observation in a related species particularly if the proposed work only takes your understanding to the same reported level of detail On the other hand examining the same research question in a different species could be useful if that system has unique features better genetics easier to screen phenotypes and easier biochemistry that allow you to obtain more detailed data than the original system Remember reviewers are trying to uncover the new information s perceived value Will it provide novel insights that your competitors in the original system won t arrive at tomorrow Scope should also provide depth to your research plan and insurance against any one approach s failure Experienced reviewers know that despite the most detailed plans experiments don t always go as planned and approaches fall short for unanticipated reasons Thus your proposal should include a built in redundancy and no single aim should depend on another s success Reviewers typically spot and frequently reject this as a linear proposal where each aim represents a technical milestone that relies on a prior aim s success Instead employ a parallel strategy where your individual aims represent individual climbers Accordingly if one goes spectacularly well you may want to re deploy the efforts of the others Thus in your proposal design you should always expect the unexpected and convince your readers that you ve engineered your plan while directed toward the summit to be flexible and responsive to the results that you obtain Limitations on scope NIH s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease NIAID advises new and early stage investigators to keep their scopes fairly conservative A key point NIAID repeatedly stresses is to avoid at all costs the dreaded overly ambitious reviewers critique The agency also writes Be innovative but be wary and As a new investigator your goal should be significant incremental progress not a giant leap forward This advice is somewhat problematic because reviewers usually use the term incremental in a pejorative context In my experience there is no such thing as a totally risk free high impact outstanding application Rather you should propose just enough risk both in intellectual novelty and technical capability to excite the reviewers but not lose them regarding feasibility In addition you should consider the principal limitations on scope namely those imposed by resources and your technical background With an annual 250 000 grant you likely will not be able to hire more than three or four full time researchers Consequently the resource limitation imposes a feasibility test on each aim Can one full time worker complete the work in a four or five year time period If your plan is overly detailed with a long experimental sequence with numerous forks and contingencies reviewers likely will score it as unrealistic You re better off proposing fewer and better described model experiments particularly ones for which you have technical precedent The other major limitation is your technical background If you do not have expertise in a particular area reviewers probably won t accept your research plan s appropriateness and feasibility If you are a relatively new investigator you may not have established an extensive track record in more than a few techniques and reviewers may judge your proposal as suffering from an overly narrow focus The obvious solution which experienced investigators employ universally is to recruit one or more external collaborators with defined expertise in techniques outside the PI s field of strength This is particularly important if experts in the field consider the additional approaches as the best way to attack the problem The value of experienced collaborators is at least threefold strengthen the research plan add credibility to the investigator team justify a larger budget Before going this route new PIs should understand that a larger team means more administrative responsibilities and potentially delicate negotiations regarding leadership authorship and control over the project s strategic direction Consider These Scope Do s and Don ts When considering your project s scope keep the following in mind Before writing up your detailed research plan DO spend time carefully deciding your research s scope DO carefully match scope with the project s proposed costs and your technical capabilities DO use scope to achieve depth redundancy and flexibility in your research plan so you can accommodate unexpected outcomes DON T try to fix your research plan s scope until you ve carefully defined your central research question DON T fall into the classic trap of proposing every experiment you can think of on the system DON T finish fixing the research plan s scope until you ve considered the proposed budget and your own technical limitations Dr Francklyn is a veteran reviewer for NSF and NIH and served as an NIH study section chair He is a professor at the University of Vermont where his scientific expertise is in protein synthesis and RNA protein interactions He is also assistant editor of the Journal of Biological Chemistry and is a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of NIH NSF Funding Advisor monthly newsletter To receive educational articles like this one sign up today to PIA s free bi monthly eNewsletter Science Pro Insider Science Pro Insider is the only eNewsletter that focuses 100 on the managerial aspects of your lab operations and your science career It shows you how to easily manage your lab better and faster and provides easy to apply expert tips shortcuts and best practices so you can focus on the research you re doing right now Subscribe today zp8497586rq Comments 0 Read More No 127 Get Your Foot in the Door With a Winning Letter of Inquiry Don t get passed over for foundation funding before getting your foot in the door Know what to include and exclude in your next letter of inquiry and how to make your best first impression count A single email can mean the difference between scoring foundation funding and going home empty handed That s because many foundations ask you to email a letter of inquiry before submitting a grant application This allows them to ensure your project is an appropriate match before they take the time to read a lengthy proposal Cynthia Duncan PhD is a former program director at the Ford Foundation where she was in charge of 15 program officers POs And she says they all required a written inquiry before talking to a PI Write a strong one page or half page letter about your research she says In your email say you will follow up with a call the following week This gives a PO time to think about your proposal What to include in a letter According to the Foundation Center your letter of inquiry should be no more than three pages And it should contain the following An introduction Include your organization s name the amount of funding needed a project description your methodology a timetable for completion and your staff s qualifications A description of your organization Explain why your institution is the right environment for the project Include a brief history and account of current programs A statement of need Convince the foundation there is an important demand your project can meet The methodology Describe the project including major activities names and titles of key project staff and your objectives Other funding sources you approached A final summary in which you restate your project s intention Sell yourself and your project Your letter should convince the foundation of your credibility in your research area says Peter Feibelman PhD Senior Scientist of Energy Sciences at Sandia National Laboratories Feibelman is the author of A PhD Is Not Enough A Guide to Survival in Science which includes a chapter on getting funded You should also explain how your research will make a difference in your field according to Doris Parent Associate Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations at Gallaudet University Make it seem like your project is replicable it s going to have major impact outside of a particular community and other communities and universities can pick up this model and move with it as well Parent says Keep it brief Your letter of inquiry should be similar to the Project Summary Abstract portion of an NIH grant proposal according to Erik Dent PhD Assistant Professor at University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health In 2010 Dent received a 225 000 three year grant from the Whitehall Foundation to research the role of dynamic microtubules in dendritic spines Dent says your letter should include a little bit of background Highlight relevant previous findings and tie them in with your project Then briefly outline what you plan to do Don t provide too much information Feibelman warns You don t want your ideas to be spreading far and wide without any benefit to you To receive educational articles like this one sign up today to PIA s free bi monthly eNewsletter Science Pro Insider Science Pro Insider is the only eNewsletter that focuses 100 on the managerial aspects of your lab operations and your science career It shows you how to easily manage your lab better and faster and provides easy to apply expert tips shortcuts and best practices so you can focus on the research you re doing right now Subscribe today zp8497586rq Comments 0 Read More No 126 How to Craft a Winning Title for Your Research Proposal The title of your grant proposal to the National Institutes of Health NIH and the National Science Foundation NSF is your first chance to win over peer reviewers with an innovative creative idea that they ll want to champion for funding A title that stands out from others and virtually compels reviewers to read your application adds one more advantage to your chances of achieving a high score if the substance of your proposal is top notch This significant piece of information must be a unique relevant and intriguing description of your research plan all packed into about 80 to 100 characters depending on the agency In this limited space you must strive to convey What you will do How you will do it And most importantly what the results will be Public agencies and private foundations want to fund work that can seriously impact society or advance science Point to the outcome of the research in your title advises Lisa Chasan Taber associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst It should inform the reviewer of the essence of the project says Dr Mario Inchiosa professor of pharmacology at New York Medical College at Valhalla Tips for creating successful titles for NIH and NSF grant applications include Be original and relevant How Make sure yours differs totally from those of already submitted applications or from funded research Agencies want fresh innovative projects Review databases of existing applications and awards at www projectreporter nih gov and www nsf gov awardsearch and contact the appropriate NIH scientific review officer or NSF program officer to ensure that your title is not redundant or closely similar to another Be accurate and use agency friendly keywords that help officials direct your proposal to the appropriate study section It s important to have terms in the title that will make it clear which study section should see it says Chasan Taber For instance using the term epidemiology of will help the application go to an epidemiology study section Find out which themes are mission relevant in priority areas for research or are emerging as future priorities For the NSF these include ecosystem impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico decontaminating dangerous drywall robotics energy alternatives climate change and its impacts nanotechnology improving science math and engineering education and commercialization of biosciences Go to www nsf gov funding for more information NIH themes getting attention include cancer HIV AIDS pediatric and adult obesity and aging related topics Information is available at http grants nih gov grants oer htm Use results driven words instead of those that describe your process Here are some examples find more at www projectreporter nih gov Testing Direct Effects of Reproduction on Stress and Mortality Via Ovariectomy Is Tolerance an Enabling Factor for Greater Alcohol Consumption Neonatal Neurobehavioral Impacts of Iodine Insufficiency and Pesticide Exposures Be authoritative That means let reviewers know that you know what you re talking about For instance if you re a researcher focusing on behavioral science obesity and nutrition in specific population segments your grant title could be Culturally Appropriate Childhood Obesity Prevention Programs for Hispanic Families An actual successful NIH grant proposal title Keep agency criteria in mind NIH criteria are significance innovation investigators approach and environment NSF criteria are intellectual merit and broader impact Use plain language Notice the simplicity directness and economy of words in this successful title Public Health Preparedness and Response for Bioterrorism A wordy awkward dramatic way of saying the same thing would be Will Public Health Authorities Be Ready When and If the Horrors of Bioterrorism Unfold in Their Cities Follow the rules NIH limits title length to 81 characters including spaces and punctuation If longer your title will be cut arbitrarily stripping away meaning and impact An agency may request a specific reference as part of a title when issuing a solicitation For example the NSF may specify that a title begin with NSCC SA which stands for National Security Conflict and Cooperation Small Award Agencies may also require specific fonts and type sizes Use active forward thinking verbs such as predicting mobilizing or empowering that tell readers your project points to results such as Enabling TV Meteorologists to Provide Viewers with Climate Change Relevant Science Education and Predicting Placebo Models Across Disease States and Empowering U S Universities for Discoveries at the Energy Frontier View your title as a work in progress Your final one may differ from your initial one because a proposal s specifics typically change during the writing process Write a provisional title that you ll finalize when you ve completed the application Get input from peer scientists and individuals outside your field preferably an English professor or an editor for proofreading and language use Colleagues with grant writing experience can be especially helpful If you re resubmitting keep your proposal s original title so it s recognizable to agency officials Finally proofread your title before hitting the send button Don t rely on your spell check program Use a dictionary Terminology must be spelled correctly An insignificant error could wreck your chances of winning funding To receive educational articles like this one sign up today to PIA s free bi monthly eNewsletter Science Pro Insider Science Pro Insider is the only eNewsletter that focuses 100 on the managerial aspects of your lab operations and your science career It shows you how to easily manage your lab better and faster and provides easy to apply expert tips shortcuts and best practices so you can focus on the research you re doing right now Subscribe today zp8497586rq Comments 0 Read More No 125 How to Develop a Beneficial Dialogue With a Program Officer PIs have to be more than just strong grant writers to get their research funded They also should have certain relational skills that allow them to successfully establish an ongoing dialogue with NIH and NSF program officers POs to seek advice find out about funding trends and determine time and funding limits The main reason that you contact the program officer is to make sure your ideas are in tune with the agency s current funding trends says Dr Charlie Senn director of proposal management Office of Research at the University of Tennessee You are looking for signals that you might be heading down the wrong path You

    Original URL path: https://principalinvestigators.org/ealert/ (2016-02-13)
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  • PI Mentor eAlert | Principal Investigators Association
    An Educational How to Manual NIH R01 Funding Toolkit Writing in Science and Medicine Guide NIH Career Development K Awards Manual The Ins and Outs of NIH R Grants Multi methods Research Design for Applied and Translational Projects Guide NIH R01 Manual 4th Edition Revising and Resubmitting NIH Proposals Guide NIH R21 Grant Application Manual NIH R15 Grant Application Manual NSF Grant Application Mentor An Educational How to Manual How to Prepare an Award Winning Oral Presentation Webinar Pack Time Management Toolkit Lab Management Executive Report Library R01 Research Strategy Insider Tips to Ace the Most Important Part of Your Proposal NIH Short Form Answers to 16 Frequently Asked Questions Crowdfunding Why You Should Jump On This Innovative Funding Source New OLAW Guide Sets a High Bar for Cage Sizes Your NSF Funding Crucial Changes to Merit Review PI Mentor eAlert Archive Older Entries No 132 What is Innovative Research anyway Posted on October 30 2014 in eAlert News For Scientists PI Mentor eAlert Research Funding eAlert Comments 0 Read More No 131 Combating Interruptions for PI s Posted on July 9 2014 in eAlert News For Scientists PI Mentor eAlert Research Funding eAlert Comments 0 Read More No 130 Am I Eligible for the NSF CAREER Award Posted on May 20 2014 in eAlert News For Scientists PI Mentor eAlert Research Funding eAlert Comments 0 Read More 129 R01 or R21 Which Would You Recommend for an Early Investigator Posted on March 13 2014 in eAlert News For Scientists PI Mentor eAlert Research Funding eAlert Comments 0 Read More 128 The Scope of Your Research Plan Find the Best Way Up the Mountain Posted on in eAlert News For Scientists PI Mentor eAlert Research Funding eAlert Comments 0 Read More No 127 Get Your Foot in the Door With

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  • Subscribe | Principal Investigators Association
    the managerial aspects of your lab operations and your science career It shows you how to easily manage your lab better and faster and provides easy to apply expert tips shortcuts and best practices so you can focus on the research you re doing right now PLEASE NOTE As future issues have been suspended you will receive the entire collection of past issues which includes 123 pages of expert advice to effectively manage your lab career and improve your grant writing skills To download the past issue collection of Science Pro Insider please provide your contact information below You ll get useful and practical advice on Financial quality grant writing funding advice effort reporting compliant spending budget preparation shrewd buying of equipment and supplies and more Lab Management increasing productivity easing hiring and firing motivating staff leading effective lab meetings reducing your administrative time and more Career Enhancement strategies for authorship ensuring deserved credit achieving tenure managing your time effectively protecting your intellectual property advancing to the next level and more To download the collection please provide your contact information below There is absolutely no cost or obligation After you submit the form you will be redirected to download your FREE eNewsletter collection in PDF format You ll also be enrolled to receive our email newsletters and special offers targeted to your interests Please make sure to fill out all fields marked with an asterisk First Name Last Name Title Institution Address 1 Address 2 City State AK AL AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DC DE FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA PR RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI

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  • Research Funding eAlert | Principal Investigators Association
    Educational How to Manual NIH R01 Funding Toolkit Writing in Science and Medicine Guide NIH Career Development K Awards Manual The Ins and Outs of NIH R Grants Multi methods Research Design for Applied and Translational Projects Guide NIH R01 Manual 4th Edition Revising and Resubmitting NIH Proposals Guide NIH R21 Grant Application Manual NIH R15 Grant Application Manual NSF Grant Application Mentor An Educational How to Manual How to Prepare an Award Winning Oral Presentation Webinar Pack Time Management Toolkit Lab Management Executive Report Library R01 Research Strategy Insider Tips to Ace the Most Important Part of Your Proposal NIH Short Form Answers to 16 Frequently Asked Questions Crowdfunding Why You Should Jump On This Innovative Funding Source New OLAW Guide Sets a High Bar for Cage Sizes Your NSF Funding Crucial Changes to Merit Review Research Funding eAlert Archive Older Entries No 132 What is Innovative Research anyway Posted on October 30 2014 in eAlert News For Scientists PI Mentor eAlert Research Funding eAlert Comments 0 Read More No 131 Combating Interruptions for PI s Posted on July 9 2014 in eAlert News For Scientists PI Mentor eAlert Research Funding eAlert Comments 0 Read More No 130 Am I Eligible for the NSF CAREER Award Posted on May 20 2014 in eAlert News For Scientists PI Mentor eAlert Research Funding eAlert Comments 0 Read More 129 R01 or R21 Which Would You Recommend for an Early Investigator Posted on March 13 2014 in eAlert News For Scientists PI Mentor eAlert Research Funding eAlert Comments 0 Read More 128 The Scope of Your Research Plan Find the Best Way Up the Mountain Posted on in eAlert News For Scientists PI Mentor eAlert Research Funding eAlert Comments 0 Read More No 127 Get Your Foot in the Door With a

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  • Advertise with Us | Principal Investigators Association
    Association PIA is the first and only organization exclusively dedicated to helping Principal Investigators and other research professionals in all fields of science research better perform their administrative and managerial duties PIA provides you with access to an unparalleled and engaged audience We ve become a trusted resource to our advertisers partners by providing relevant timely content and by working with them to develop new and innovative campaigns The PIA Advantage Our Audience Advertising Opportunities Testimonials Contact Us Unparalleled Access to New Buyers Increase leads conversion rates and sales by making your brand messages more noticeable Reach PIA s expanding network of some 100 000 decision making scientists and researchers Launch a combined campaign e mails white paper and Website customized to your specific goals and budget Leverage PIA s reputation for management and operational expertise to position your company as a provider of choice for lab based products Gain qualified prospects poised to buy with average lab budgets of more than 250 000 Get in front of thousands of prospects who currently enjoy our free educational products such as our bi monthly eNewsletter and free white paper and webinar downloads Break through the advertising clutter in science and technical based media PIA is the sole national source providing how to expert advice for the non science side of lab research The PIA Advantage Industry executives and decision makers rely on us for high quality relevant content that helps them save time stay connected and be successful in their industries Contact For additional information please contact Mariangela Ruiz Principal Investigators Association mariangela principalinvestigators org We will respond to all requests within 48 hrs Our Audience 75 of our customers hold an MD or PhD Almost half say they primarily use the internet to obtain information on research products and services The average laboratory budget is over 250 000 Please refer to the chart below as an indicator of where grant awardees allocate their funds Based on an independent survey done by PIA to existing customers as of Dec 2012 Solutions Tailored to Your Needs PIA offers you a partnership with a number of results oriented advertising approaches that can be executed independently or combined based on your needs E MAIL MARKETING You create the HTML file we send it to the correct audience Target your message to the most relevant prospects Increase the impact of your e mail marketing with a customized e mail campaign We ll schedule your e mail delivery for when people are most likely to check e mail increasing the likelihood they ll read it and take action WHITE PAPER E MAIL SPONSORSHIP White paper content development with our editors participation White paper topics can range from grants and funding to lab management among others We create the HTML file promoting the white paper and we send it to the correct audience Excellent lead generation resource ADDITIONAL ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES Online Advertising eNewsletter Ads Webinar Sponsorships Co Marketing Opportunities Contact For additional information please contact Mariangela Ruiz

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  • NIH R01 Funding Toolkit | Principal Investigators Association
    plans and processes to create them This is not hard but it is a requirement for a competitive proposal Walk away with the ability to easily and efficiently address the data management or data sharing plan requirement for your proposal to include Distinguish data types Understand the five key components and requirements Develop an access and sharing protocol Create a plan with examples you can use New NIH Biosketch Format Keys to Writing a Compelling Scientific Narrative a 99 value 60 Minute On Demand Webinar Available in CD MP4 or PDF Transcript During this information packed webinar your expert presenter will cover the changes made to the biosketch which involve telling your scientific story Such a story should feature your major accomplishments as they lead to the current grant you are requesting This Webinar will also cover which accomplishments to include and what not to mention 5 Key Take Aways Methods for writing a compelling scientific narrative Style and substance points based on career stage The new page limits and how to effectively use the space How to pick your most influential papers to indicate your impact on the field How to put your best foot forward while remaining humble Specific Aims The Logical Framework That Holds Your Grant Proposal Together a 99 value 60 Minute On Demand Webinar Available in CD MP4 or PDF Transcript Your Aims page is your opportunity to wow reviewers from the get go If you fail to capture their attention here the rest of your proposal may not stand a chance As you begin to craft your Aims keep in mind these 3 common mistakes most reviewers find A lack of innovative ideas Aims not being justified clearly and Aims which are not hypothesis driven Join your expert presenter Dr Christopher Francklyn an NIH investigator and reviewer to gain first hand knowledge on Using the Specific Aims page as a foundation during the writing of the application The essential components of the Specific Aims page and how to write them How many Aims should you include Can there be too few or too many Explain the importance of the Specific Aims page relative to the other parts of the application The importance or not of the hypothesis during the writing of your Specific Aims page How to use your Specific Aims page to convince reviewers your work has Impact Storytelling to Inspire Funders Describing Your Research in a Whole New Way a 149 value 60 Minute On Demand Webinar Available in CD MP4 or PDF Transcript During this inspirational Webinar Dr John Greenhoe will show how researchers can get traction through anecdotal messages that attract human interest A veteran foundation professional with a creative writing background Greenhoe is uniquely qualified to show how storytelling can drive home the importance of your research This Webinar will also include examples that show how stories can be employed to showcase research in grant reports proposals and cases for support You will examine several storytelling examples that will

    Original URL path: https://principalinvestigators.org/product/nih-r01-funding-toolkit/ (2016-02-13)
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