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  • Analysis | Page 6 | Privacy International
    Special Rapporteur on right to privacy Stories of surveillance in Morocco In wake of Paris attacks France introduces dangerous and broad surveillance bill Ethiopia expands surveillance capacity with German tech via Lebanon Rights organisations call on UN Human Rights Council to establish Special Rapporteur on the Right to Privacy International Women s Day How surveillance is used to assert control FREAKShow Why governments meddling with encryption standards hurts us all

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/blog?page=5 (2016-04-27)
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  • Analysis | Page 7 | Privacy International
    bring about surveillance reforms It s time for our governments to stop eavesdropping and start listening In wake of prosecutor s shooting Argentinian human rights group releases report on troubled intelligence agencies Looking to MLATs A step towards transparency for intelligence sharing agreements On democracy day its time for intelligence agencies to tell the truth Swiss Government forced to reveal destinations cost of surveillance exports Cameron s call for banning

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/blog?page=6 (2016-04-27)
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  • Analysis | Page 8 | Privacy International
    Egypt UPR a missed opportunity to address threats to the right to privacy New report finds little oversight of surveillance intelligence agencies in Latin America High stakes UN enters late stage negotiations for recognition of right to privacy in digital age Explaining the CJEU s right to be forgotten ruling Beyond the hype The big issues in the European Court s right to be forgotten ruling The need for a

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/blog?page=7 (2016-04-27)
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  • Analysis | Page 9 | Privacy International
    has given us widespread insecurity The trap of simplicity Why analogies for surveillance fail us Six things we know from the latest FinFisher documents Australian government pushing to expand surveillance hacking powers Elaman and Gamma what s selling and who s buying in Indonesia Identity theft persists in Pakistan s biometric era UN privacy report a game changer in fighting unlawful surveillance No slow DRIP Expansion of surveillance powers being

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/blog?page=8 (2016-04-27)
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  • Analysis | Page 31 | Privacy International
    News Analysis Black people in England and Wales six times more likely to be stopped and search by police than white people Open letter to UN Agency on dangers of biometric passport standard Open letter to Members of the Eerste Kamer and Tweede Kamer regarding Dutch ID proposals FAQ ID cards in the UK CCTV Frequently Asked Questions Privacy International statement on CCTV surveillance in the UK French wiretapping scandal

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/blog?page=30 (2016-04-27)
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  • UK Government asks EU Court 'Did you really mean it?': Bulk data retention and access is under scrutiny in Europe and the UK.... again | Privacy International
    powers in 2009 saying How have we got ourselves into the position where there is such a marked imbalance of power between the citizen and the state There are nonetheless critics of these powers in both of the main political parties The case being heard in the CJEU is being brought by MPs from the two main political parties Importantly bulk data retention and access plays a central role in the Investigatory Powers Bill The outcome of this case could lead to a reduction of such powers that are currently outlined in the Bill Camilla Graham Wood Legal Officer Privacy International said The UK in enacting legislation that is almost identical to the European Data Retention Directive which the CJEU ruled unlawful is mandating data retention on a widespread indiscriminate and untargeted basis Such a broad and wholesale retention of communications data is in violation of European law The effect of DRIPA is to use bulk data retention to create a dossier on every person in the UK It includes every internet and mobile phone transaction you undertake every location will be filed every meeting noted every website indexed and every call marked Blanket retention of communications data without suspicion creates a honeypot of information for criminals and hackers and this case will have implications for personal privacy and the security of individual personal data Open Rights Group s Legal Director Myles Jackman said The Court found that you shouldn t collect people s data unless there is a specific reason and that there should be strict controls for allowing access to this data With both DRIPA and the IPBill the British government has ignored this call to respect our human rights We look forward to the CJEU s clarification of their ruling and hope that it condemns once and for all the blanket collection of our personal data NOTES TO EDITOR The History In 2000 the Government told Parliament that the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 RIPA was the total extent of surveillance powers that were needed However within weeks of RIPA receiving Royal Assent a report from UK law enforcement was leaked stating that the power the Government truly wanted was companies to retain communications data on all their users Immediately after 9 11 as governments around the world over reached with new pieces of legislation the UK Government did pursue data retention powers in the Anti Terrorism Crime and Security Act But the law only asked for voluntary data retention a service provider could but was not obliged to retain data The Government told Parliament again that this was the total extent of surveillance power that was needed Rather than seek further approval for greater ambitions from the UK Parliament the UK Government then went to Europe From 2001 onwards it pushed the EU to adopt a Directive on data retention the Data Retention Directive DRD This would make data retention compulsory on all service providers across Europe including the UK When the UK Government held

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/830 (2016-04-27)
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  • Press Statement on the Second Reading of the Investigatory Powers Bill | Privacy International
    second reading in the House of Commons Instead of listening to negative public response to the Bill and evolving EU law precedent the UK Government continues to fully advocate for the Bill s prompt passage through Parliament Privacy International Director of Campaigns Harmit Kambo said Today s second reading debate was a missed opportunity to put a brake on new surveillance powers that fundamentally shift the balance of power between the individual and the state The Labour Party and the SNP strongly criticised many fundamental aspects of the Bill but we are disappointed that both parties abstained from the vote We nonetheless welcome their calls for substantial amendments to the bill before they consider actually supporting the Government The Shadow Home Secretary Andy Burnham said the bill is not acceptable in its current form and Joanna Cherry MP the SNP Justice and Home Affairs spokesperson said that many of the powers are fantastically intrusive and that the Bill in its current form is on a collision course with the European courts The bill and additional documents add up to over 1 000 pages and there is very little time to get it into shape before it is passed into law

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/806 (2016-04-27)
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  • First Report of UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Privacy Condemns UK Investigatory Powers Bill | Privacy International
    Related Privacy 101s Communications surveillance Mass Surveillance What is Privacy In his first report to the UN Human Rights Council the main UN human rights political body composed of 47 states from around the world the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Privacy has offered a scathing critique on the UK Investigatory Powers Bill In particular the Rapporteur noted how bulk surveillance powers including bulk hacking are disproportionate and violate the right to privacy as established by human rights courts The Rapporteur noted that the powers proposed in the Investigatory Powers Bill run counter to the findings of the UN Special Rapporteur on Counter Terrorism and to recent judgements of the European Court of Justice and the European Court of Human Rights Echoing the concerns of many privacy activists including Privacy International the Rapporteur raised serious questions about the precedent the IP Bill could set for the enjoyment of the right to privacy across the world He recommended the UK Government refrain from taking disproportionate measures which may have negative ramifications far beyond the shores of the United Kingdom The Special Rapporteur will present his report which covers a range of issues and includes his plan of action for

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/797 (2016-04-27)
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