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  • Panama Papers law firm founder says massive offshore company leak is ‘campaign against privacy’. We disagree. | Privacy International
    for transparency about how the powerful wield their power We need transparency and good solid investigation to understand where and how our right to privacy is eroded Privacy and transparency are not opposites They are two sides of the same coin As privacy advocates we use transparency capabilities to investigate surveillance Meanwhile privacy as a right requires transparency from the institutions that gather and use our data Privacy International like other human rights groups conducts investigations in the public interest That allows us to understand for example how Colombia built a shadow surveillance system despite evidence of illegal interceptions or how UK police appear to be collecting private communications data at protests according to a Vice News investigation Many of the Panama Papers revelations are in the public interest insofar as they concern the transformation of public assets like taxpayers money and state funds into private gains and allow the powerful to avoid scrutiny Fonseca called journalism around the leaked files an international campaign against privacy But what Fonseca is really doing is advocating a status quo of privacy for the kings and transparency for the beggars Or rather privacy for the business moguls politicians corporations and government agencies and transparency for the citizens consumers activists and journalists For the public our financial systems are now surveiled by design Our transactions are labelled as suspicious and sent for mining by intelligence agencies We need IDs to open accounts and our records are profiled by credit agencies who facilitate key decisions about us and our families Secretive institutions collate this information to decide whether or not we are terrorists While a certain degree of this is necessary for public order what s clear is that we are watched while the kings are able to circumvent many of these measures and escape

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/824 (2016-04-27)
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  • The FBI has made us all vulnerable with its iPhone hack | Privacy International
    here Since the horrific Brussels and Istanbul attacks we ve all looked at our daily lives and saw vulnerability and risk Where else could terrorists attack We begin to formulate security responses CCTV communication surveillance identity cards they aren t panning out Perhaps we need to take things to the next level How about we build an uber anti terrorism system that grinds all our data together and identifies the people who wish to do us harm That uber system has been built it s your smart phone Health information Apple Watch and other fitness trackers record your heart rate throughout the day Financial information Apple Pay and Google Wallet process your purchases Locations Your phone has recorded them all Biometrics You probably recorded your fingerprint along with enough selfies too The FBI claimed that the iPhone along with all of this information was impregnable It decided to take Apple to court in order to access the phone owned by the employers of Syed Rizwan Farook one of the perpetrators of the San Bernardino terrorist attack in December This was a great PR coup for Apple Apple s systems were perceived as out of reach to the most powerful technology force in the history of humanity the US Government s intelligence and law enforcement community However someone found vulnerability in Apple s old mobile phone operating system iOS8 and the agency has now admitted that it has accessed the device The FBI has announced that it will not inform the tech firm how it breached the phone s security features leaving millions of devices compromised Over on this side of the pond the UK Government will soon have the ability to do all of this in secret no less The Investigatory Powers Bill unless last minute changes are made will

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/823 (2016-04-27)
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  • Don't Celebrate Cellebrite, Because Your Phone Is at Risk | Privacy International
    UK and abroad for many years The company has been mentioned on the BBC spy show The Fall and even made an appearance in CSI Cyber Alongside the company s appearance in fictional spy shows Privacy International has retrieved some direct marketing from the company s brochures when attending secretive trade shows While much of the advertising previously available shows the company providing capabilities for SIM Card cloning and Android devices it has also claimed capability for operating on Apple operating systems Privacy International has found similar forensics systems previously used in Colombia by the DAS security agency which were subsequently disbanded for their involvement in human rights abuses including illegal surveillance The Israeli authorities are currently proposing to regulate the export of such forensics tools in sweeping export regulations Revealed by Privacy International today an excerpt from a recently acquired brochure shows Cellebrite advertising the Widest support for extraction and decoding from Apple devices running iOS3 This capability comes at a price Cellebrite has tiered license platforms The company s Ultimate option includes many features that would be valuable a government or criminal enterprise including the extraction of calendars contacts and even GPS analysis Passwords and media files are also part of the extraction suite and a very wide range of hardware is supported by the equipment The capabilities listed here give the user access to virtually all of the sensitive material contained on the target phone It is highly unlikely that Cellebrite are the only party with these capabilities Apple claims to have devised a number of safeguards to protect against brute force attempts to determine the passcode First Apple uses a large iteration count which functions to slow attempts to unlock an iPhone The iteration count is calibrated so that it would take more than 5 years

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/817 (2016-04-27)
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  • Dostoevsky, Dr Dre and Data | Privacy International
    want your follow up to be a 1 008 page epic Russian novel Maybe you want to read something very different next maybe some contemporary American short stories such as No one belongs here more than you by Miranda July But you know I don t think the classic Russian literature reader stereotype should concern us However what if the choices that were presented to you weren t based on consumer behaviour patterns but on your ethnicity Last week I received a flyer from one of the London mayoral candidates which focused on my Indian ness The candidate is seeking my vote partly on the assumption that as a British Indian the category I always tick on official forms I own a lot of expensive gold jewellery that he would protect from burglars and tax inspectors burglars and tax inspectors please take note I don t own any jewellery at all My non British Indian neighbours did not receive this flyer Also last week Ars Technica reported that two very different trailers for the movie Straight Outta Compton were shown to Facebook users based on their assumed ethnicity If you were perceived to be white the LA hip hop group N W A were represented by the movie s promoters as gangsta rappers If you were perceived to be black or Hispanic the trailer depicted Dr Dre and Ice Cube as artists and their music as political protest It should concern us greatly that a box we tick on an official form or an update we share on social media feed into big data algorithms that can make such crude and offensive judgments about us and indeed against us It enables politicians to try to manipulate our vote It enables marketeers to tap into what they perceive to be our

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/812 (2016-04-27)
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  • Betrayal and the future of surveillance power | Privacy International
    that technology was making this harder and demanded that technology be designed for them With every step safeguards were reduced Next governments will demand that companies betray their users and use our technologies to compromise us In recent weeks we ve seen the FBI demand Apple to develop a special version of their operating system just for the FBI A Brazilian court wants Whatsapp to somehow retrieve encrypted messages it no longer possesses And the United Kingdom Government wants to order a company anywhere to hack its own customers and deliver malware So what does future policy and practice look like Here are the options 1 Golden keys Governments order companies to defy the laws of mathematics and common sense and 20 years of lessons on cybersecurity and build secret backdoors or keys and share it with every UN member state 2 Old school Require companies to store all our content on their own servers despite everyone except Google recognising this as an insecure model In its court filings Apple had to herald its iCloud device backup services as a reason to avoid the compulsory backdoor 3 Malicious infection Order a company to develop and deploy malware to compromise your device without you noticing This is quite hard for good security companies and unfortunately easy for others This will make everyone concerned that Apple BMW or GE s latest update for your phone car or fridge is actually there to compromise your security rather than improve it Then the Government or company can access whatever it pleases or is ordered to do 4 GovernmentOS Companies will create secret versions of their operating systems for Government that can be installed upon request or directly by Governments The idea that you own your device is over the code that runs it will

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/810 (2016-04-27)
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  • European Leaders Rally For Freedom, Call for Increased Surveillance | Privacy International
    by Central European University The response by world leaders to the horrific terrorist attacks in France earlier this month has been all too familiar As officials rallied for freedom of expression they called for increased vigilance against extremists by expanding government surveillance powers Leading the way is UK Prime Minister David Cameron who has called for an end to safe spaces for extremists on the internet When the Prime Minister

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/125 (2016-04-27)
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  • Behind the rise of the private surveillance industry in Central Asia | Privacy International
    Controls Mass Surveillance What is Privacy Related Tech Explainers Internet Monitoring Analysis Intrusion Location Monitoring Monitoring Centre Phone Monitoring Related Projects Big Brother Incorporated The following op ed appeared in openDemocracy written by Edin Omanovic Research Officer at Privacy International It s not surprising that some of the states in Central Asia spy on people Authoritarianism across the world relies on the intrusion into and lack thereof of a private sphere From the KGB to their modern incarnations the autocracies in the region continue to rely on state surveillance and other entrenched means of political control to stay in power New technologies and communications means heralded as great tools of progress are being met the world over with censorship and surveillance At best this minimises the utility of these technologies at worst it turns them into tools for unprecedented state spying and repression What may be somewhat surprising in Central Asia is the sophistication of some of the surveillance technologies that are being used and the amount of foreign companies supplying them An investigation into surveillance in Central Asia conducted by Privacy International the findings of which were recently released raise serious questions as to how democratic progress stands a

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/124 (2016-04-27)
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  • Two minute reads | Page 2 | Privacy International
    by Stasi operatives constantly for 15 years Read more about Australia s metadata grab will create modern day Stasi files The Government is trying to create a surveillance state The following is an excerpt from an op ed that appeared in the Daily Telegraph written by Carly Nyst Legal Director of Privacy International Read more about The Government is trying to create a surveillance state Is this a club we want to be part of The following is an excerpt from an Op Ed written in the New Zealand Herald by Privacy International s Legal Officer Anna Crowe Since the release of documents by Edward Snowden nearly a year ago New Zealand has often been seen as a passive participant in the Five Eyes intelligence sharing alliance not unlike a good kid hanging out with the wrong crowd Read more about Is this a club we want to be part of There s No Good Reason for Spy Agencies to Snoop on Humanitarian Groups The following article written by Carly Nyst Privacy International s Legal Director originially appeared on the Future Tense blog on Slate Read more about There s No Good Reason for Spy Agencies to Snoop on Humanitarian Groups Chilean government to subject citizens to American surveillance apparatus This comment by Privacy International Executive Director Gus Hosein ran in Ciper Chile on 19 May 2014 Read more about Chilean government to subject citizens to American surveillance apparatus The role of companies in guaranteeing privacy and human rights in the digital realm The following was a speech given by Carly Nyst Head International Adovacy at the UN Forum on Business and Human Rights Geneva on 3 December The internet and innovations in technologies have opened up previously unimagined possibilities for communication expression and empowerment New technologies have become essential

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/opinion-pieces?page=1 (2016-04-27)
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