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  • Two minute reads | Page 3 | Privacy International
    read the whole article in Spanish please go here Read more about Two sides of the same coin the right to privacy and freedom of expression Data the new conflict resource The following is an excerpt from a guest article which appeared on openDemocracy written by Privacy International s Head of Advocacy Carly Nyst Forget blood diamonds There s a new resource being mined and exploited in the developing world data Read more about Data the new conflict resource Russia s surveillance state This is a excerpt from a piece written by Privacy International partners Andrei Soldatov and Irina Borogan which appears in the Fall issue of the World Policy Journal Read more about Russia s surveillance state We need public debate not a secret tribunal on covert British surveillance The following excerpt is from a posting in the Guardian s Comment is Free by Carly Nyst Privacy International s Head of International Advocacy In order to challenge a secret surveillance system and to demand the government explains why it is spying on British citizens one must apply to a secret tribunal that does not make public its proceedings or the reasons for its decision It may seem like an Orwellian fantasy but this is the stark reality of the British legal system Read more about We need public debate not a secret tribunal on covert British surveillance Big Brother surveillance is our reality Below is an excerpt of an article that recently appeared in Melbourne Australia s The Age written by Carly Nyst Head of International Advocacy at Privacy International Mass surveillance of a country s citizens by its government can no longer be said to be the preserve of authoritarian and dictatorial states Read more about Big Brother surveillance is our reality PI in Slate Privacy for the

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/opinion-pieces?page=2 (2016-04-27)
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  • Two minute reads | Page 4 | Privacy International
    play we organize within it Our lives have been in essence turned inside out and dispersed in endless ethereal clouds multi verses that follow us around in extra dimensionality Big Data refers to the endless digital grains of sand we produce as we move think and act Read more about Big Data meets Big Brother Why privacy is essential for free speech to thrive Last year Index on Censorship published an interview with Google s chief legal officer and senior vice president David Drummond The company was still reeling from the aftermath of the news that an attack had been launched on Gmail from China Drummond proposed that free speech needed to be part of the international agenda at multilateral and bilateral trade discussions just like piracy Western governments whose economies certainly benefit from the internet sector should make this happen he said Read more about Why privacy is essential for free speech to thrive Don t be evil strengthen due diligence and export licenses for tech companies In 1999 a young technology company called Google was brainstorming a mission statement for the corporation A series of core principles were written on a blackboard until one employee summarized them as

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/opinion-pieces?page=3 (2016-04-27)
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  • Audio surveillance | Privacy International
    capacity The fiction of spy novels are now the very real tools that can be used to overhear conversations Directional microphones are a form of audio surveillance where microphones are trained to focus and record particular noises and avoid recording others These powerful microphones can also be operated on the body a vest that conceals any hint of the microphone being in use Alongside the body worn microphones are microphones hiding in plain sight as objects from our daily lives Including things such as watches lighters car keys Within all of these tiny and unassuming objects are very small microphone audio recorders and transmitters The microphone will pick up all sounds being made a transmitter will convert the sound waves into electrical signals around it that will then be recorded and stored within the same object Alternatively the transmitter will move the recorded noise to a receiver located nearby that will record the sound The latter would allow for longer recording time and smaller items in which a microphone could be hidden The process of recording a voice in basic terms requires three things a microphone a transmitter and a receiver Microphones are covered above they take in the sound waves that are being created in audio surveillance normally the human voice Transmitters take those sound waves and convert them into electronic signals This maintains the quality of the sound waves so that they can be transmitted long distances If the sound waves remained just sound waves they would degrade almost immediately after being created the equivalent of what we hear when someone speaks to us Conversion into electronic signals preserves the captured sound and allows for easier transmission to receivers and storage The final stage in the basics of audio surveillance is the receiver The function of a receiver

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/69 (2016-04-27)
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  • Big Data | Privacy International
    Press Releases Two minute reads Explainers Reports State of Surveillance Briefings Investigations Research Reports Submissions to the UN Legal Actions About Us Staff Trustees Financial Opportunities Contact Donate You are here Home Big Data Watch our short video 4m45s explaining what big data is and what the implications are for our privacy when Governments and companies have access to this much data about us Privacy International Registered Charity Number 1147471

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/572 (2016-04-27)
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  • Biometrics | Privacy International
    Speaker verification uses a 1 1 voiceprint comparison the voice of the individual speaking is compared to the pre recorded voiceprint of the individual they claim to be Voiceprints collected for speaker verification are stored in databases for later comparison An audio surveillance VoIP or phone monitoring technology that picks up a few seconds of speech can transmit the audio to a speaker identification technology Speaker identification uses a 1 to many comparison a captured voice is compared to a database of voiceprints often those collected under the guide of speaker verification for a match The effectiveness of speaker identification systems relies on the number of voiceprints available for comparison This often motivates the widespread collection of voiceprints and leads to their long term storage Speaker identification technologies employ statistical methods to quickly find the corresponding voiceprint and identity Voice analysis methods are becoming increasingly sophisticated and can now isolate individual voices in noisy environments and use speech analysis to predict the language gender and even stress levels of individuals Voice analysis technologies particularly those focused on behavioural analysis are prone to error When measuring supposed truthfulness or stress levels these voice based technologies have been shown to generate false positives false negatives and have an accuracy not exceeding that of chance It is imperative that the limitations of these technologies are fully understood before implementation and the results are not interpreted as absolutes Facial recognition technologies use unique facial properties to identify an individual Any video or picture of a face acquired from video surveillance or social media analysis can be sent to facial recognition technologies for storage in a database and processing Once received the technology finds a match by employing powerful computational methods that extract key facial data from the image or video Feature based approaches map distinctive facial features eyes nose forehead chin lips shape and compute their geometric relationships relative distances ratios angles These relationships are transformed into vectors which can be visualised as arrows that have both magnitude and direction and stored in a database Any subsequent set of vectors that matches elements of the database set to a predetermined accuracy level will return a positive match Other facial recognition technologies use statistical methods such as principal component analysis to increase computational speed Multiple facial images can be compiled together and used to generate a composite facial portrait Components of these composite images the basic features that make up the average human face are called eigenfaces When a face is captured in a picture or video the stored eigenfaces can be combined with appropriate weights to form the captured face A match is found if this can be done with a certain level of accuracy Similarly this method is used to detect faces in crowded images any object that can be reconstructed sufficiently from an eigenface is likely a face Facial recognition systems deployed on CCTV networks are capable of detecting faces tracking faces and recognising an individual face The speed and accuracy of

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/70 (2016-04-27)
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  • Communications Surveillance | Privacy International
    Privacy Agenda News Analysis Press Releases Two minute reads Explainers Reports State of Surveillance Briefings Investigations Research Reports Submissions to the UN Legal Actions About Us Staff Trustees Financial Opportunities Contact Donate You are here Home Communications Surveillance Watch our short video 3m54s explaining what communications surveillance is and why we are calling for an end to mass communications surveillance Privacy International Registered Charity Number 1147471 62 Britton Street London

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/569 (2016-04-27)
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  • Counter-surveillance | Privacy International
    they need to generate a key the key is sometimes a series of random alphanumerical characters the more characters with greater variety the theoretically better secure the person is The user then decides who they would like to share their key with By sharing the key they are given the recipients the ability to decrypt communications sent to them Anybody who doesn t have the key sent to them will struggle to reveal the contents of the communication it would require a large and sophisticated computer system By using encryption then the user counters any surveillance technology that may be in use by rendering the communication unreadable without significant investment Law enforcement and intelligence agencies will use this to prevent individuals from easily listening in or reading their communications just in the same way that activists and human rights defenders will use encryption to prevent law enforcement and intelligence agencies from easily listening or reading their communication Standard encryption is prevalent throughout the internet helping at a very basic level to prevent surveillance Websites implement a form of encryption known as Secure Socket Layer SSL Every time you open a web page and see either https or a locked padlock encryption has been enabled between your machine and the web page It is there to protect bank transactions and purchases email and social network exchanges However SSL doesn t mean much as far as encryption goes and is there only to prevent rudimentary attacks from hackers Government and law enforcement agencies could use techniques such as a Man in the Middle attack to disrupt the secure connection A Man in the Middle attack occurs when what a user s comptuer believes is a legitimately randomly assigned key is actually a key generated by the attacker The key that should only be known to the user and the intended recipient is actually known by a third party too The communications are no longer secure in this scenario and SSL encryption is defeated IMSI Catcher Catchers are also an increasingly popular counter surveillance tool as their rise in popularity matches the increased prevalence of the IMSI Catchers or other phone monitoring technologies they are designed to detect The IMSI Catcher Catcher monitors phone networks in an attempt to detect any GSM Global System for Mobile communications or eavesdropping equipment which may be using the network to transmit such as hidden microphones If the system detects a hostile signal based on preset instructions by the user the equipment is powerful enough to determine the location of the equipment for removal or even disrupt its transmissions and thus counter its operation Bug detection tools monitor rooms for physical bugs such as microphones and cameras They are sometimes referred to as Non Linear Junction Detectors or Spectrum Analyzers These products look for the emission of signals in a room and report via alarm that something is present Alternatively they show graphs of operating frequencies around the room and when the graph moves to show a

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/71 (2016-04-27)
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  • Data Protection | Privacy International
    Global ARM Global Privacy Agenda News Analysis Press Releases Two minute reads Explainers Reports State of Surveillance Briefings Investigations Research Reports Submissions to the UN Legal Actions About Us Staff Trustees Financial Opportunities Contact Donate You are here Home Data Protection Watch our short video 3m00s explaining what data protection is and why it is so important Privacy International Registered Charity Number 1147471 62 Britton Street London EC1M 5UY 44

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/570 (2016-04-27)
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