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  • DNA | Privacy International
    matches are possible in so called familial searches where it is possible to identify people related to the DNA being compared for example from a scene of a crime Collection of DNA can be compelled by authorisation or by situation Individuals can be forcibly compelled to submit their DNA at some occurrence at arrest charge booking and increasingly for border management They can also be ordered sometimes by court authorisation to submit DNA or DNA can be collected from other databases Finally individuals can be asked to volunteer DNA as occurs during large scale searches Today over 60 countries have forensic DNA databases with at least 34 countries planning to set up new databases The databases can contain the profiles and yet some governments also retain the original samples collected from individuals for some undetermined future use Despite the widespread growth and the significant potential for abuse there are no international standards and limited safeguards to protect the privacy of citizens affected by their countries DNA collection practices As a result policies for collection access to information and retention vary widely across the world If DNA databases help solve crime what s the problem While DNA databases and profiling can aid policing the collection and storage of some of such personal and intimate information raises serious concerns when it comes to protecting an individual s right to privacy The growth of forensic DNA databases worldwide is often characterized as the natural response to public demands for better policing But the alarming rate of creation and expansion of such databases with little public input and discussion has been anything but piecemeal In some countries DNA is being collected routinely from people on arrest even when it has no relevance to the crime being investigated and DNA profiles and samples have been stored indefinitely from large numbers of innocent people Other countries lack basic quality assurance for laboratories or a reliable system to track DNA evidence from the crime scene to the court and prevent mix ups contamination and miscarriages of justice The conditions under which DNA can be taken and how the data is used is increasingly problematic Governments are collecting DNA in ways they previously collected fingerprints and photographs from people who are arrested and not charged For instance the US Supreme Court ruled in July 2013 Maryland v King that the collection of arrestees DNA was legal under the Fourth Amendment because it is a safe and accurate way for the police to process and identify the persons and possessions they must take into custody The reasoning was that it is a legitimate identification procedure during arrest and that it is no different than matching an arrestee s face to a wanted poster of a previously unidentified suspect What about if DNA is only collected under certain circumstances DNA databases like others are susceptible to function creep When the National DNA Database NDNAD was set up in 1995 police in the UK collected and stored DNA from convicts and

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/49 (2016-04-27)
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  • Equipment | Privacy International
    large satellites attached to the top turning round and round as some spy fiction would have us believe but instead are designed to appear boring and unassuming Unmannd Aerial Vehicles more commonly referred to as Drones are another piece of equipment that is increasingly being put to surveillance purposes Swapping the more commonly recognised tools seen on military grade drones for long range cameras the use of UAVs for Video Surveillance has created a new regulatory headache for law makers and privacy campaigners These tools are beginning to be used by law enforcement as they become more and more affordable and easier to use Able to be controlled remotely via a control pad or even via a tablets in some instances barriers to use are beginning to break down Additionally range of operation is beginning to increase ranging from 1 kilometre to 2 5 kilometres in some cases and allowing for flight of up to 30 minutes some UAVs are even able to operate as fleets from one control panel The surveillance technology that is able to be attached is also becoming more varied intuitively Video Surveillance benefits from being deployed on a UAV but it has also been observed that sophisticated Phone Monitoring technologies are now able to be deployed such as IMSI Catcher s Motion Detection technology is a first point of contact for larger more conventional surveillance systems such as CCTV systems or Audio Surveillance systems to be alerted to target a specific area Motion detection technology is normally deployed at particular perimeters of protected property to provide a first alert system that a particular area has been intruded upon More sophisticated systems allow for mobile deployment meaning they are attached on vehicles and monitor the perimeter around the vehicle and alerting any breach These systems are

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/72 (2016-04-27)
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  • Metadata | Privacy International
    Global Privacy Agenda News Analysis Press Releases Two minute reads Explainers Reports State of Surveillance Briefings Investigations Research Reports Submissions to the UN Legal Actions About Us Staff Trustees Financial Opportunities Contact Donate You are here Home Metadata Watch our short video 3m44s explaining what is metadata and why we think it is important that your metadata is protected Privacy International Registered Charity Number 1147471 62 Britton Street London EC1M

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/573 (2016-04-27)
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  • Video surveillance | Privacy International
    will undoubtedly be applied in contexts that are beneficial However the egregious capabilities enabled by the improved technology must be of primary concern before rushing to implementation Video surveillance technologies also enable location monitoring The low cost of cameras paired with the trend of expanding CCTV capabilities in times of domestic security concerns has created an urban environment rife with instruments of mass surveillance Tracking how a target moves throughout the CCTV network and all associated actions who they speak to which events they attend and which appointments they have has become simple The effects and dangers of normalised video surveillance must be understood as the pervasiveness of video surveillance technologies continues to increase Video surveillance technologies include video transmitters video receivers and video transceivers which transmit and receive video Video receivers are usually paired with a retention system that stores the video sent by the video transmitter Data retention laws for captured videos vary widely between CCTV operators and individual policies are seldom indicated when entering a new CCTV network Video transmitters can be wired into a network or operate wirelessly Concealed cameras can be embedded in clothing or placed in household objects for surreptitious surveillance Cameras have become so concealable that the fiction of spy films has now become reality Cameras concealed in drink cans and tissue boxes and embedded in ties and bricks are routinely sold and used in the real world Drones or unmanned aerial vehicles UAVs are aircrafts without a human pilot aboard They are capable of autonomous flight by being controlled by on board computers or piloted from a distance by a human operator Drones range in size from 9 inch wingspans to the size of commercial airplanes This ranging size allows drones to be highly customisable for a variety of surveillance practices Drones

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/77 (2016-04-27)
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  • What is Privacy? | Privacy International
    Wide Open Global ARM Global Privacy Agenda News Analysis Press Releases Two minute reads Explainers Reports State of Surveillance Briefings Investigations Research Reports Submissions to the UN Legal Actions About Us Staff Trustees Financial Opportunities Contact Donate You are here Home What is Privacy Watch our short video 3m06s explaining why privacy is so important Privacy International Registered Charity Number 1147471 62 Britton Street London EC1M 5UY 44 0 20

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/568 (2016-04-27)
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  • The Right to Privacy in Uganda | Privacy International
    Submissions to the UN Legal Actions About Us Staff Trustees Financial Opportunities Contact Donate You are here Home The Right to Privacy in Uganda Date Monday April 18 2016 Related Privacy 101s What is Privacy This stakeholder report is a submission by Privacy International PI Unwanted Witness Uganda the Collaboration on International ICT Policy for East and Southern Africa CIPESA and the East and Horn of Africa Human Rights Defenders

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/844 (2016-04-27)
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  • The Right to Privacy in Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of) | Privacy International
    Briefings Investigations Research Reports Submissions to the UN Legal Actions About Us Staff Trustees Financial Opportunities Contact Donate You are here Home The Right to Privacy in Venezuela Bolivarian Republic of Date Monday April 18 2016 Related Privacy 101s What is Privacy This Universal Periodic Review UPR stakeholder report is a submission by Privacy International PI the International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School IHRC and Acceso Libre General

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/845 (2016-04-27)
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  • The Right to Privacy in Zimbabwe | Privacy International
    to the UN Legal Actions About Us Staff Trustees Financial Opportunities Contact Donate You are here Home The Right to Privacy in Zimbabwe Date Monday April 18 2016 Related Privacy 101s What is Privacy This Universal Periodic Review UPR stakeholder report is a submission by Privacy International PI the International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School IHRC the Zimbabwe Human Rights NGO Forum the Forum and the Digital Society

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/846 (2016-04-27)
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