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  • Elaman and Gamma: what's selling and who's buying in Indonesia? | Privacy International
    the product in the late 2000s In Indonesia Gamma TSE controversially supplied the Ministry of Defense with unspecified equipment wiretapping gear according to the House Intelligence Commission last September The Indonesian government has not answered requests for further information about the nature of the equipment Furthermore command servers for FinSpy a Finfisher product have been located in Indonesia While we do not know when or from where these were exported by Elaman or by Gamma the companies reportedly sell Finfisher exclusively to governments A new cadre of spies Seven years before Gamma s most recent Indonesian sale Elaman proposed setting up a Technical Surveillance Unit TSU for an unspecified Indonesian client The March 2005 white paper is a blueprint for a unit that would provide technical support to The Special Operations Groups and all the Intelligence and Security Services More than an elite rapid reaction force the proposed TSU was a counterterrorism unit with the capacity to be kitted out to collect physical surveillance and audio surveillance on targets by way of covert recording devices worn on the body hidden in vans and installed as bugs Under the program each TSU officer would receive equipment adapted to his her skills Students specially selected for courses including mail opening and covert methods of entry would be taught by former police and military specialists on Elaman staff who are willing to carry out the trainings at a UK training ground or to fly out to Indonesia with business class tickets laundry and other expenses paid by the client government or rather its taxpayers Beyond merely providing or proposing equipment Elaman counsels governments on their counter terrorism policies Tucked away in the shopping list Elaman pitched is a Terrorist Database software program with a one year maintenance package That Indonesia has a terrorist database is often rumoured but rarely openly discussed In 2005 Elaman counselled the Indonesian government to create a complete intelligence database at the TSU command centre with the ability to link with the other databases within the country kept in its own secure environment Elaman was offering English to Arabic translation software for voice email and fax monitoring with voice identification capacities presumably to Arabic speaking observant Muslims as part of a broader counterterrorism strategy Tracking surveillance sales Much of the kit Elaman proposed in 2005 has become standard tools in many police forces But Elaman and Gamma produce much more invasive spy products And as Indonesia s military spending is shrouded in secrecy it is unclear what the Indonesian government has purchased from partners Elaman and Gamma whether it went through with the TSU proposal or the true nature of Gamma s reported wiretapping equipment One of the reasons we know so little about these transactions is that any impact assessment of the exports often only kick in if the purchase is a very costly one Last October Privacy International wrote to the UK Export Credits Guarantee Department about the Gamma TSE Indonesia sale as the UK government underwrote

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/358 (2016-04-27)
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  • Identity theft persists in Pakistan's biometric era | Privacy International
    hour to get expired identity cards renewed He said that the menace of bogus identity cards could be wiped out by updating personal biometric details in the national database A neatly suited well spoken man Ali Muhammad Irfan an immigration officer with the Federal Investigation Agency sits in a warm office in Karachi He deals with many deportee cases on a daily basis where people are able to obtain fraudulent identity cards and passports for international travel in collaboration with agents in NADRA and passport offices Many try to seek asylum in Australia Norway the UK and Germany Yet most of them do not make it and are deported back to Pakistan In some cases Irfan says victims of fraud do not even know that an imposter will be able to obtain a forged identity card under their name and travel abroad for asylum or better life prospects NADRA reports that it has deployed a state of the art facial matching system with the capabilities to stop fraud and forgery in identity documents yet people are still able to obtain forged identity cards This was very puzzling to understand given the supposed surety accuracy and privacy of NADRA database that such a scam was still happening even after the introduction of new chip based identity cards How fake documents are obtained NADRA has established a centralized biometric data warehouse that is connected to more than 400 registration centres across Pakistan that feed it biometric details including facial and thumb impressions Given the complexity and isolation in which the systems work I needed to access someone with inside NADRA with the information and contacts to explain the way biometric matching worked and how people are still able to obtain forged identity documents That s when I spoke with Nazeer who works as an identity agent for people coming from Afghanistan to Pakistan Like a travel agent he arranges everything from entering Pakistan through the Chaman border crossing to traveling to Karachi to obtain forged identity documents The costs are going up these days he says as NADRA officials have implemented strict policies and required documentation for CNICs He charges 130 000 Pakistan rupees or 1 313 for a single person According to the International Labour Organisation the average monthly wage in Pakistan is roughly 25 229 rupees or 255 The costs for entire family are even higher depending upon the number of individuals Last week Nazeer reported obtaining five forged ID cards from Karachi for a family from Kunduz in Afghanistan The process can involve finding a Pakistani family willing to sell their own identity for a hefty amount in exchange for registering aliens as family members and providing the necessary documentation for registering foreigners as siblings Alternatively it can also involve using already available identity cards from banks universities and government offices where people provide copies of their CNIC as part of documentation I asked him how he gets information about families from NADRA as isn t it all very

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/334 (2016-04-27)
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  • UN privacy report a game-changer in fighting unlawful surveillance | Privacy International
    a haystack is not legitimate the focus should be on what the implications of the surveillance are on the haystack 2 Mandatory third party data retention is neither necessary or proportionate The High Commissioner makes the important finding that the distinction between communications content and data is no longer persuasive hopefully putting to bed once and for all arguments that privacy protections should be attenuated depending on whether surveillance captures content or metadata The report rightly calls mandatory data retention what it really is part of a State s surveillance regime and declares that it appears neither necessary or proportionate sufficient for it to comply with human rights law Although this finding rides the wave of anti data retention sentiment that has been building since the Court of Justice of the European Union found the EU Data Retention Directive to be in violation of human rights law the fact that the High Commissioner has added her voice to those condemning mandatory data retention will no doubt prove to be critical as States such as the United Kingdom and Australia seek to revive the practice in the weeks and months ahead 3 Intelligence sharing regimes may run afoul of human rights law The High Commissioner s report provides some of the most robust and strongly worded analysis of any international or regional human rights authority to date on the relationship between intelligence arrangements and human rights She begins by striking to the heart of the Five Eyes surveillance alliance by declaring that secret rules and secret interpretations even secret judicial interpretations of law do not have the necessary qualities of law Neither the High Commissioner says do laws or rules that give the executive authorities such as security and intelligence services excessive discretion The report thus seriously undermines the legal frameworks relied upon by the UK and US to attempt to justify their surveillance practices as lawful In analysing intelligence sharing relationships the report makes a damning finding for the Five Eyes noting that there is credible information to suggest that some Governments systematically have routed data collection and analytical tasks through jurisdictions with weaker safeguards for privacy operating a transnational network of intelligence agencies through interlocking legal loopholes designed to outflank the protections of domestic legal regimes Intelligence sharing arrangements arguably fail the test of lawfulness says the report because individuals are unable to foresee when they might be affected by surveillance at home or abroad The High Commissioner also makes the novel suggestion put forward by civil society but so far ignored by States that governments have a positive obligation to protect their own populations from surveillance by foreign entities be they private or public This finding has serious implications for governments of the Five Eyes who were well aware of and complicit in the vast surveillance activities of their fellow alliance members 4 Any action by a State to interfere with digital communications engages their human rights obligations no matter where it occurs The report takes to task

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/321 (2016-04-27)
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  • No slow DRIP: Expansion of surveillance powers being rammed through Parliament | Privacy International
    more audacious as just this week Privacy International Liberty and Amnesty International meet with GCHQ in court challenging the TEMPORA programme and information sharing between the UK and US governments In both process and substance DRIP shows an utter disregard for the democratic process and the rule of law The misleading information coming from our elected leaders is an affront to the British public which has led to leading legal academics across the UK to debunk the assertion that the bill contains no new surveillance powers as false In an open letter to Parliament the scholars said that DRIP goes far beyond simply authorising data retention in the UK In fact DRIP attempts to extend the territorial reach of the British interception powers expanding the UK s ability to mandate the interception of communications content across the globe It introduces powers that are not only completely novel in the United Kingdom they are some of the first of their kind globally The letter continues DRIP is far more than an administrative necessity it is a serious expansion of the British surveillance state Addressing data retention The EU Data Retention Directive has been criticised for violating the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union and the European Convention on Human Rights since it was passed in 2006 When the ruling came down in April striking down the Directive we wrote to the Home Office seeking clarity on what their next steps were Aside from a quasi dismissal of the CJEUs concerns it doesn t appear that DRIP has made an effort to comply with the CJEU judgment which had laid out 10 principles that data retention must comply with paragraphs 58 68 of the ruling here DRIP re enacts the practice allowing for mandatory blanket communications data retention of the entire population for up to 12 months a practice which has already found to be unconstitutional in many European states including Germany Romania Belgium Austria and Greece amongst others DRIP also fails to address the very real privacy concerns laid out in the judgment and does not address the existing lax regime under which personal data can be accessed Despite the Court being clear on the private nature of communications data metadata there is no such acknowledgment in DRIP Government continues to diminish the importance of metadata the who when what and where of communications despite public statements from intelligence officials on how much it reveals While the Government does rely on communications data for counter terrorism serious crime and financial crime operations the 514 608 requests for this data in 2013 alone shows an unnecessary and disproportionate usage of communications data in their work so much so that the UK Interception Communications Commissioner warned that it seems to me to be a very large number It has the feel of being too many Just as the Directive was incompatible with human rights so too is this rushed bill Rather than assuaging these concerns DRIP is a power grab dressed

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/299 (2016-04-27)
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  • What to Know: GCHQ On Trial | Privacy International
    US are lawful Despite the widely published revelations by Edward Snowden about the scope of UK and US surveillance practices the UK government persists in refusing to neither confirm nor deny the existence of a programme at the heart of these claims Tempora As such the hearing will with the Tribunal seeking to determine on the basis of agreed hypothetical facts the following issues If the Tempora mass communications surveillance programme exists whether it violates the rights to privacy and freedom of expression enshrined in Articles 8 and 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights and If the UK government has access to intelligence collected by the US under its PRISM and UPSTREAM programmes whether that violates Arts 8 and 10 ECHR The case will also put under the spotlight the mechaisms that oversee the British intelligence agencies including the IPT itself It is the first time that these UK government agencies including GCHQ have appeared in a public hearing to answer direct allegations and state their position on the mass surveillance operations as a whole since the Snowden revelations The IPT was established 14 years ago to hear allegations that the UK intelligence agencies have breached legal rights Almost all its hearings are held in secret Much of this hearing will be public Below you will find more background information about the hearing including information for the media relevant documents and filings for the case and what Privacy International has been doing about GCHQ s mass surveillance For the media Joint release from Privacy International and Amnesty International UK Rushes through invasive surveillance laws as intelligence agencies go on trial WHAT Historic case to determine whether mass data surveillance operations by the UK are lawful WHEN Monday to Friday 14 18 July 2014 WHERE Court 19 Investigatory Powers

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/239 (2016-04-27)
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  • Stop breaking the internet: internet and communications service providers take legal action against GCHQ | Privacy International
    decentralised control that has enabled the internet to flourish Activists and academics across the world as a result have expressed outrage at the destructive activities of British and American intelligence services imploring GCHQ and the NSA not to break the internet and to guarantee a secure web for all Some companies responsible for maintaining these have been frustrated and spoken up against the increased spying of intelligence agencies see Vodafone Cisco FB Google etc But action is needed not just words The seven providers assert that GCHQ attacks on internet service and network providers are not only illegal they are destructive undermining the goodwill the companies and groups rely on and the trust in security and privacy that makes the internet such a crucial tool of communication and empowerment Each of these organisations are committed to the privacy freedom of expression and security of their users and a free and open internet Together they are demanding an end to GCHQ exploitation of internet services the targeting of their systems administrators and protections for their customers and users whose rights may have been infringed Global in scope Many of the surveillance practices revealed by Edward Snowden are premised on weakening even breaking the infrastructure of the internet These include compromising encryption standards through the NSA s BULLRUN programme tampering with routers and exploiting leaky phone applications GCHQ and the NSA have also developed devastating capabilities that enable them to infect potentially millions of individuals laptops and mobile phones with malware as a means to spying on users through their own devices The most concerning of such activities is arguably the targeting attacking and exploitation of the companies that maintain core communications infrastructure and their employees Der Spiegel was the first to reveal these illicit activities by GCHQ reporting on the intelligence agency s attack on Belgacom the Belgian telecommunications company and noting According to the slides in the GCHQ presentation the attack was directed at several Belgacom employees and involved the planting of a highly developed attack technology referred to as a Quantum Insert QI It appears to be a method with which the person being targeted without their knowledge is redirected to websites that then plant malware on their computers that can then manipulate them Some of the employees whose computers were infiltrated had good access to important parts of Belgacom s infrastructure and this seemed to please the British spies according to the slides Subsequent disclosures published by The Intercept on 12 March 2014 provide further information about the range of network exploitation and intrusion capabilities available to GCHQ A joint presentation by GCHQ and NSA entitled Quantum Theory depicts the process by which GCHQ exploited network infrastructure for targeted infection of users devices The presentation clarifies that rather than deploying Man in the Middle attacks GCHQ and NSA employ a Man on the Side technique which covertly injects data into existing data streams in order to create connections that will enable the targeted infection of users The technique

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/382 (2016-04-27)
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  • How privacy-friendly is the new European Parliament? | Privacy International
    France 11 UK 8 Netherlands 8 and Austria 8 the geographic and political spread of the candidates reflects and supports the continent wide recognition that the protection of privacy has become a serious concern in the public discussion Although this is an encouraging start remembering that there are in total 750 MEPs means much more work is needed to put privacy rights continuously on the EU s agenda during economic negotiations human rights discussions or business deals But how serious is the commitment While key MEPs from the Socialists Democrats the Greens European Free Alliance the far left GUE and Liberals all pledged their support to the WePromiseEU Charter it is disappointing that many of the party political manifestos made only light references to privacy surveillance and the protection of our civil liberties The European Greens advocated the most on privacy topics including references in their manifesto to cut down the trade in surveillance technology promoting a Digital Bill of Rights and making clear calls on Governments to respect personal data and the right to privacy The Liberals have also long been advocates to a degree on data privacy topics in Brussels Yet the two groups suffered losses in both votes and experienced MEPs as the French Green Party lost 8 of their 14 seats the German Liberal FDP losing 9 of their 12 seats while in the UK the Liberal Democrats lost of all but 1 of their 11 seats Similarly the Pirate Party saw its vote share drop across Europe with the loss of both of its Swedish seats and are now reduced to representation by the newly elected Julia Reda in Germany Both leading groups the centre right European People s Party and the centre left Socialists Democrats focused squarely on economic and labour issues mainly attempting to pull the EU from the economic mire it finds itself still in The EPP did at least state clearly as a bare minimum that privacy is a fundamental inalienable human right while noting their group s role in driving the reform for data protection rules and stating that any negotiation with the United States on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership TTIP would have to meet high EU standards in certain areas EU Parliament response to mass surveillance The WePromiseEU campaign highlights the increasing focus Parliament has been placing on privacy rights and the shifting landscape that newly elected MEPs will find themselves in once they join The tail end of this current term sent shockwaves through Europe following the Snowden revelations on the overreach of intelligence agencies The Parliament is normally a forceful voice on raising human rights failings across the world and the shocking scale of the global activities of the US and some European intelligence agencies brought a sharp response from the influential Committee for Civil Liberties Justice and Home Affairs LIBE including a year long inquiry This is in stark contrast to the muted response that still occurs today in the UK A wide range

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/139 (2016-04-27)
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  • Analysis | Page 13 | Privacy International
    files complaint against UK over mass surveillance The UK surveillance exports A piece of CAEC Development privacy A winning formula German OECD NCP unwilling to investigate role of German company in human rights violations in Bahrain Open source software Export Uncontrollable France defies tide of accountability measures to expand surveillance powers Despite Australian government s claims our privacy rights are not insignificant Biometrics friend or foe of privacy Not just

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/blog?page=12 (2016-04-27)
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