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  • Is this a club we want to be part of? | Privacy International
    Contact Donate You are here Home Is this a club we want to be part of Date Wednesday June 11 2014 Authors Anna Crowe Related Privacy 101s Communications surveillance The Five Eyes Mass Surveillance Metadata What is Privacy Related Projects Eyes Wide Open The following is an excerpt from an Op Ed written in the New Zealand Herald by Privacy International s Legal Officer Anna Crowe Since the release of documents by Edward Snowden nearly a year ago New Zealand has often been seen as a passive participant in the Five Eyes intelligence sharing alliance not unlike a good kid hanging out with the wrong crowd However Snowden documents released last month and the news that New Zealand appears to be sharing intelligence used in drone strikes shows this perception is far from the truth The Government is an active participant in this secretive surveillance alliance between the United States Britain Canada Australia and New Zealand The Government Communications Security Bureau GCSB our representative is keyed into US National Security Agency NSA programmes that have caused controversy abroad spying on close allies mass surveillance of foreign populations and weakening our ability to protect our privacy online Sadly we aren t

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/110 (2016-04-27)
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  • There's No Good Reason for Spy Agencies to Snoop on Humanitarian Groups | Privacy International
    the CIA is no longer using vaccination programs as a front for spying operations may come as a relief to many humanitarian workers Yet their fears should not be completely assuaged because the CIA s activities which undoubtedly threatened the safety of humanitarian workers and those they seek to help pale in comparison to the surveillance that the NSA is conducting on humanitarian organizations across the globe In one of the least discussed stories arising out of the materials leaked by Edward Snowden in December 2013 the Guardian reported that the NSA and GCHQ a British intelligence agency are targeting humanitarian agencies such as UNICEF the U N Development Program and Medecins du Monde Doctors of the World Each of those organizations named in leaked GCHQ documents had been allocated a specific ID number in GCHQ s target knowledge base indicating they had been identified for targeted surveillance by the agency The United Nations made no public response to the allegations When Medecins du Monde wrote to GCHQ seeking an explanation the intelligence service refused to answer any questions The Guardian says that the documents do not disclose the extent of any surveillance or for how long any collection took

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/109 (2016-04-27)
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  • Chilean government to subject citizens to American surveillance apparatus | Privacy International
    the US Government provides for this data US privacy law is amongst the weakest in the world particularly as immigration and national security are used as exceptions to even basic safeguards What is most problematic is that US law only protects US persons Any data sent by the Chilean Government would be exempted from the US s weak legal regime When the US receives data on foreigners it customarily retains this information in its vast databases for 100 years Joining the VWP will mean that the United States now has access to significant amount of personal information of Chileans This raises concerns regarding which Chilean authority would be responsible for deciding and managing information shared with the US the possibility of the US sharing this data with third parties as well as arbitrary refusal of access to the US because of potentially erroneous data in Chilean databases A Chilean citizen who is mistreated on the basis of this data will have no right to redress under US law and his or her data will continue to reside in the US without any real ability to appeal The VWP also requires member countries to adopt an e passport The establishment of a Chilean e passport will likely result in the Chilean Government establishing a database of biometrics This includes an individual s fingerprints names sex date and place of birth nationality and passport number Potentially more sensitive data could be included The lack of a privacy law in Chile means that Chileans have no legal protections to ensure that the data is accurate that it is not used for other purposes and that is not shared with other departments or governments But there are concrete steps that the Chilean Government can take to protect the the privacy rights of their citizens

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/108 (2016-04-27)
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  • The role of companies in guaranteeing privacy and human rights in the digital realm | Privacy International
    gradually being dismantled by laws and technologies that enable government intrusion into our emails internet activities phone calls movements and relationships The societal impacts of widespread surveillance are to instill fear in the citizenry fear that our thoughts words and relationships will be the subject of interception and analysis fear that the content we access on the internet will be exposed This fear can cause us to withdraw from public spaces censor our communications and refrain from accessing certain services A free and open press is nothing if the journalists writing for newspapers are at risk of surveillance if the individuals who read the online news sources are being tracked and their data recorded Political activists and human rights defenders cannot openly speak out against repressive government actions when their every word and movement is tracked and recorded in preparation for their torture A participatory and inclusive democracy cannot function when its members live in constant fear Countering and undoing these developments must be a social imperative for governments across the globe However the responsibility to undo surveillance and reclaim a free and open internet also lies in the hands of the private sector who has played such a central role in building the physical infrastructure and innovative services that make the internet such a revolutionary social institution Companies have three key roles to play in ensuring that the digital realm remains a guarantor of human rights First the private sector must resist In circumstances in which the State is failing in its own duty to respect human rights by for example mandating the installation of surveillance filters on internet infrastructure or demanding the modification of mobile technologies to include backdoors for government surveillance the private sector must push back Even when State requests are made under domestic laws if such laws conflict with internationally recognised human rights norms of privacy and free expression the private sector has a duty to the greatest extent possible to challenge the demands of the government and to avoid complicity in such human rights abuses In the world of technology and the internet corporations play a role as a fundamental barrier between the individual and the State If necessary therefore the private sector should take legal action to resist government demands and protect the interests and rights of individuals as much as possible Second the private sector must do no harm Technology is not neutral The private sector is complicit in manufacturing mass and invasive surveillance technologies and selling them to countries in which there is a serious risk that they will be used to violate human rights The surveillance technology industry has a responsibility to ensure a that it does not manufacture or market surveillance technologies that by their very nature conflict with human rights and b that it ensures that technologies which may be appropriate in some circumstances do not fall into the wrong hands Technologies in the hands of governments intent on committing serious human rights violations can become a tool

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/114 (2016-04-27)
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  • Snowden spyware revelations: we need to unmask the five-eyed monster | Privacy International
    a Comment originally publihsed by The Guardian written by Privacy International s Head of Research Eric King As the global public reels from yet another Snowden revelation this time that the US and UK intelligence forces have hacked into and planted spyware on more than 50 000 computer networks worldwide the hypocrisy of the US and British governments is brought into sharp relief Less than four years ago Hillary Clinton chastising China declared that countries or individuals that engage in cyber attacks should face consequences and international condemnation In an interconnected world an attack on one nation s networks can be an attack on all Given what we now know to be the Five Eyes complete stranglehold on the world s internet infrastructure how can we possibly reconcile repeated American appeals to internet freedom and condemnation of Chinese internet monitoring with US sponsored network hacking Intelligence agencies and the governments that operate them have been revealed to be not merely secretive but also hypocritical and dismissive of any legitimate public concerns It is time to bring these practices and the covert agreements that underpin them into the light For more than 60 years the secret patchwork of spying arrangements and

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/113 (2016-04-27)
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  • The road to surveillance is paved with good intentions – and warning signs | Privacy International
    Authors Carly Nyst Related Privacy 101s Big Data Communications surveillance Mass Surveillance Metadata What is Privacy Related Tech Explainers Analysis Biometrics Location Monitoring Related Projects Global Privacy Agenda The following is an excerpt from a Comment originally published by The Guardian written by Privacy International s Head of Advocacy Carly Nyst From databases to mobile phone apps and SMS systems GPS tracking and humanitarian drones to biometric registration new technologies are rapidly becoming central to the delivery of humanitarian and development aid Refugees fleeing the Syrian conflict are having their irises scanned and their identity documents digitised Nurses in Nigeria are using SMS systems to communicate HIV test results to health facilities Cash is being delivered to those living in Kenya s slums through the M Pesa mobile phone banking system The drive behind this technological and data evangelism is well intentioned The usefulness of these tools has played out repeatedly on the humanitarian stage be it through the use of Twitter analysis to map the spread of cholera in Haiti or the distribution of smart cards to flood affected populations in Pakistan New technologies have made delivering a id faster easier and cheaper Yet the technological revolution in foreign

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/111 (2016-04-27)
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  • It’s time to take on government surveillance – and the push has to come from us | Privacy International
    originally was published by IFEX and is written by Carly Nyst Head of International Advocacy at Privacy International The reality of the modern world is that governments both of our own countries and of foreign states have greater capabilities to carry out invasive surveillance of citizens no matter where they reside or what flag they pledge to And caught in the cross fire of the expanding surveillance state is freedom of expression which is underpinned by the right to privacy For a long time there have been legitimate fears of a pervasive surveillance state and those fears continue to be confirmed by the Edward Snowden leaks which week after week provide a progressively more terrifying glimpse into international spying regimes It is now clear that the US and UK governments perceive broad scale and real time surveillance once the reserve of repressive regimes to be a legitimate tool of democratic states Without a doubt this issue will be front and center next week in Bali as civil society government officials and experts from the security and technology sector gather for the Internet Governance Forum 2013 IGF just as it was at the UN Human Rights Council meeting in Geneva in

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/104 (2016-04-27)
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  • The promise, and problems, of mobile phones in the developing world | Privacy International
    the developing world Date Sunday October 13 2013 Authors Anna Crowe Related Privacy 101s Big Data Data Protection What is Privacy Related Tech Explainers Analysis Location Monitoring Phone Monitoring Related Projects Global Privacy Agenda The following is an excerpt from a guest article which appeared on openDemocracy written by Privacy International s Research Officer Anna Crowe Humanitarian actors often forsake the right to privacy in favour of promoting programmes utilising phones to deliver services either through a lack of understanding or wilful ignorance as to the risks involved It is clear that the massive uptake of mobile phones in developing countries has played a crucial role in the success of many development interventions over the past decade As well as aiding communication mobiles have given people access to a range of services and information and revolutionised information collection and recording in humanitarian disasters However despite being a widely popular development tool the human rights implications of using mobile phones in development initiatives are not well understood by those funding the projects or using the data of those they purportedly wish to help Development actors need to think carefully about whether they could be inadvertently undermining the promotion and protection of

    Original URL path: https://privacyinternational.org/node/112 (2016-04-27)
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