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  • Courses and conferences
    http www publichealthagency org Home Courses and conferences Courses and conferences 2011 Public Health Agency Designed and produced by the Public Health Agency Source URL http www publichealthagency org directorate

    Original URL path: http://www.publichealthagency.org/print/856 (2016-02-11)
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  • Adverse weather
    compiled public health information to assist the public in these situations Support networks for those affected by the adverse weather 1 Keeping warm during adverse weather 2 Carbon monoxide poisoning 3 Advice if flooding occurs 4 Using emergency water supplies 5 Water advice following restoration 6 Looking after vulnerable and elderly neighbours 7 Severe weather warnings The Met Office s severe weather warning page provides up to date information about weather that is likely to cause disruption http www metoffice gov uk public weather warnings tab map 8 If you are considering embarking on a journey during bad weather you should consult the Met Office for travel conditions If you must drive during severe weather make sure you are prepared for bad weather conditions For further advice see http www nidirect gov uk index htm 9 2011 Public Health Agency Designed and produced by the Public Health Agency Source URL http www publichealthagency org directorate public health health protection adverse weather Links 1 http www publichealth hscni net support networks 2 http www publichealth hscni net keeping warm during adverse weather 3 http www publichealth hscni net carbon monoxide poisoning 4 http www publichealth hscni net advice if flooding occurs

    Original URL path: http://www.publichealthagency.org/print/1819 (2016-02-11)
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  • Support networks | HSC Public Health Agency
    who feels worried or stressed Rural Support Bureaucracy family circumstances health and finances can cause stress and anxiety We offer a listening and signposting service for farmers and rural families in Northern Ireland All calls are confidential and the helpline operates from 8am to 11pm seven days a week voicemail and support options available at all other times phone 0845 606 7 607 Rural Support website can be accessed at http www ruralsupport org uk Lifeline If you or someone you know is in distress or despair call Lifeline on 0808 808 8000 This is a free confidential service where trained counsellors will listen and help immediately on the phone and follow up with other support if necessary The helpline is available 24 hours a day seven days a week You can also access the Lifeline website at www lifelinehelpline info Samaritans If something s troubling you then get in touch We re here 24 hours a day 365 days a year Contact us on 08457 90 90 90 or visit our website at http www samaritans org For more information on looking after your mental health and the support available across Northern Ireland can be found at www mindingyourhead info You can also visit your GP for advice Print Facebook Twitter Directorates Public Health Health Protection News Publications Courses and conferences Adverse weather Support networks Keeping warm Carbon monoxide Flooding Emergency water supplies Water restoration advice Vulnerable neighbours Antibiotic Awareness Blood borne viruses and STIs Ebola E coli O157 Emergency preparedness environmental hazards Gastrointestinal infections Holiday travel advice Healthcare associated infections antimicrobial resistance Health protection improvement inequalities Immunisation vaccine preventable diseases Respiratory diseases Surveillance data Zoonoses Health and Social Wellbeing Improvement Service Development and Screening HSC Research and Development Professional Medical Issues Public Health Annual Research and Practice Conferences

    Original URL path: http://www.publichealthagency.org/support-networks (2016-02-11)
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  • Keeping warm during adverse weather | HSC Public Health Agency
    and that your house is propery ventilated to reduce the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning If your electric is working set the timer on your heating to come on before you get up and switch off when you go to bed in very cold weather set the heating to come on earlier rather than turn the thermostat up so you won t be cold while you wait for your home to heat up never use an electric blanket and hot water bottle together as you could electrocute yourself if you have an electric blanket check what type it is some are designed only to warm the bed before you get in and should not to be used throughout the night make sure your electric blanket is safe to use by getting it tested every three years You can help keep warm by wearing plenty of thin layers rather than one thick one putting on a coat hat scarf gloves and warm shoes or boots when you go outside wearing clothes made of wool cotton or fleecy synthetic fibers wearing bed socks and thermal underwear at night Eat Well Food is a source of energy which helps to keep your body warm Try and make sure you have hot meals and drinks regularly throughout the day Print Facebook Twitter Directorates Public Health Health Protection News Publications Courses and conferences Adverse weather Support networks Keeping warm Carbon monoxide Flooding Emergency water supplies Water restoration advice Vulnerable neighbours Antibiotic Awareness Blood borne viruses and STIs Ebola E coli O157 Emergency preparedness environmental hazards Gastrointestinal infections Holiday travel advice Healthcare associated infections antimicrobial resistance Health protection improvement inequalities Immunisation vaccine preventable diseases Respiratory diseases Surveillance data Zoonoses Health and Social Wellbeing Improvement Service Development and Screening HSC Research and Development Professional Medical Issues Public

    Original URL path: http://www.publichealthagency.org/keeping-warm-during-adverse-weather (2016-02-11)
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  • Carbon monoxide poisoning | HSC Public Health Agency
    often mistaken for other illnesses such as food poisoning or flu the symptoms can be similar to flu but without a raised temperature Please look out for these signs and symptoms and consider if carbon monoxide poisoning could be the cause Anyone who suspects they may be suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning should immediately turn off all appliances go outside and seek medical help from a qualified healthcare professional Appliances should not be used again until they have been serviced by a registered engineer Carbon monoxide poisoning causes a number of deaths and hospital admissions each year It is vital that we are all vigilant to ensure that we are protected from its dangers Advice on the risks and measures that can be taken to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning is available online from nidirect It is essential that people take care when using appliances and ensure that they are safe and used in properly ventilated spaces To minimise the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning the PHA recommends the following install an audible Carbon Monoxide alarm that meets British or European standards BS Kitemark or EN 50291 These cost as little as 20 00 and can be purchased from large DIY stores and food retail stores Alarms however should not be used as a substitute for regular servicing of appliances have their fossil fuel and wood burning appliances such as boilers heaters and cookers checked by an appropriately registered engineer sweep chimneys and flues every year if you use solid fuel if you are in rented accommodation ask your landlord to provide you with an up to date gas safety record This is a requirement by law and is particularly important for students renting houses and flats keep flues air vents and grilles clear and ensure rooms are well ventilated Further

    Original URL path: http://www.publichealthagency.org/carbon-monoxide-poisoning (2016-02-11)
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  • Advice if flooding occurs | HSC Public Health Agency
    not always clear whether water is contaminated or not the public are urged to exercise caution and assume that flood water is contaminated The PHA reminded residents there are a number of precautions to prevent health problems if there is a flood situation in the home These include wherever possible try to avoid coming into direct contact with floodwater do not let children play in floodwater use rubber gloves when cleaning up wash hands after being in contact with flood water sewage or anything contaminated by these wash children s hands regularly clean toys that have been in flood water with disinfectant cover cuts or open sores don t eat any food that has been in contact with flood water clean all surfaces with disinfectant before any food is placed on them contact your GP if you or a relative develops a stomach upset following flooding Care must be taken when clearing up after flooding as there is a serious danger posed by carbon monoxide fumes from the indoor use of generators to dry out buildings If flooding occurs in your local area contact the Flooding Incident Helpline on 0300 2000 100 immediately This service is available 24 hours a day every day of the year Print Facebook Twitter Directorates Public Health Health Protection News Publications Courses and conferences Adverse weather Support networks Keeping warm Carbon monoxide Flooding Emergency water supplies Water restoration advice Vulnerable neighbours Antibiotic Awareness Blood borne viruses and STIs Ebola E coli O157 Emergency preparedness environmental hazards Gastrointestinal infections Holiday travel advice Healthcare associated infections antimicrobial resistance Health protection improvement inequalities Immunisation vaccine preventable diseases Respiratory diseases Surveillance data Zoonoses Health and Social Wellbeing Improvement Service Development and Screening HSC Research and Development Professional Medical Issues Public Health Annual Research and Practice Conferences Nursing and Allied

    Original URL path: http://www.publichealthagency.org/advice-if-flooding-occurs (2016-02-11)
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  • Using emergency water supplies | HSC Public Health Agency
    of containers used to collect the water cannot be guaranteed As a precautionary measure people should boil and cool the water if they are going to use it for drinking brushing teeth to make ice cubes and other similar uses It is important that bottles and containers used to collect water are clean and suitable for containing drinking water Don t use anything that previously contained products that can t be consumed as washing may not remove all of the previous product Dr Harper also reminded the public about the continued importance of maintaining good hand hygiene particularly before cooking food and eating and after using the toilet and changing nappies The very young and elderly are particularly vulnerable The PHA recommends the following advice use any water you have for hand washing first before you use if for showering or bathing use antibacterial hand gels or wipes if you have them if you don t have water immediately available to wash hands to conserve water you can use disinfectant wipes to clean kitchen and bathroom areas in particular be extra vigilant in supervising small children to keep their hands clean too Downloads Preview Attachment Size Public Health Advice when water supply is low Dec2014 pdf 267 93 KB Print Facebook Twitter Directorates Public Health Health Protection News Publications Courses and conferences Adverse weather Support networks Keeping warm Carbon monoxide Flooding Emergency water supplies Water restoration advice Vulnerable neighbours Antibiotic Awareness Blood borne viruses and STIs Ebola E coli O157 Emergency preparedness environmental hazards Gastrointestinal infections Holiday travel advice Healthcare associated infections antimicrobial resistance Health protection improvement inequalities Immunisation vaccine preventable diseases Respiratory diseases Surveillance data Zoonoses Health and Social Wellbeing Improvement Service Development and Screening HSC Research and Development Professional Medical Issues Public Health Annual Research and Practice Conferences

    Original URL path: http://www.publichealthagency.org/using-emergency-water-supplies (2016-02-11)
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  • Water advice following restoration | HSC Public Health Agency
    is a priority for NI Water and strict disinfection procedures are adopted during any repair and water samples will be taken following a repair to our water network The level of chlorine in the water supply may be boosted temporarily The amount of chlorine is carefully controlled and monitored at our treatment works and strategic points in the distribution system Water quality samples are taken following burst mains repairs to ensure that a satisfactory water supply is restored to customers Further information can be found on www niwater com Print Facebook Twitter Directorates Public Health Health Protection News Publications Courses and conferences Adverse weather Support networks Keeping warm Carbon monoxide Flooding Emergency water supplies Water restoration advice Vulnerable neighbours Antibiotic Awareness Blood borne viruses and STIs Ebola E coli O157 Emergency preparedness environmental hazards Gastrointestinal infections Holiday travel advice Healthcare associated infections antimicrobial resistance Health protection improvement inequalities Immunisation vaccine preventable diseases Respiratory diseases Surveillance data Zoonoses Health and Social Wellbeing Improvement Service Development and Screening HSC Research and Development Professional Medical Issues Public Health Annual Research and Practice Conferences Nursing and Allied Health Professions Operations Site menu Home About Directorates News Publications Contracts Consultations Webcasts Links Contact Legal information

    Original URL path: http://www.publichealthagency.org/water-advice-following-restoration (2016-02-11)
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