archive-org.com » ORG » R » REPTILESOFAZ.ORG

Total: 220

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Yarrow's Spiny Lizard (Sceloporus jarrovii) - Reptiles of Arizona
    The scales on the tail are larger and more spiny than those of the body Males have blue patches on the belly and throat Belly and throat patches are faint or lacking in females Its complete collar distinguishes this lizard from Arizona s other Sceloporus DISTRIBUTION This lizard s is found in the sky island mountain ranges of southeastern Arizona at elevations ranging from about 4 300 to over 10 000 It has been introduced to the Santa Catalina mountains north of Tucson HABITAT An inhabitant of Madrean Evergreen Woodland Petran Montane Conifer Forest and Petran Subalpine Conifer Forest communities It is found in rocky canyon bottoms on cliff faces boulder fields talus slopes and outcroppings BEHAVIOR This diurnal rock dweller can be active at any time of the year but winter activity is usually restricted to unseasonably warm sunny days In winter this lizard shares communal shelters Winter shelters usually consist of crevices on a south facing cliff or rock outcropping In the warm months both males and females are territorial and chase other lizards out of their home range It is often relatively easy to approach but may retreat into a crevice or rock pile if persistently harassed DIET Yarrow s Spiny lizard sits and waits for prey to wander within close proximity It feeds on a variety of insects including beetles grasshoppers ants wasps and caterpillars It also feeds on a variety of spiders REPRODUCTION This live bearing lizard mates in fall and gives birth to up to 14 young in late June Females are able to store sperm over the winter and delay embryonic development until temperatures rise in spring By Thomas C Brennan Brennan T C A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Lizards-Subpages/h-s-jarrovii.html (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Desert Spiny Lizard (Sceloporus magister) - Reptiles of Arizona
    has a complete collar DISTRIBUTION The Desert Spiny Lizard ranges across the deserts of southwestern Arizona and the northeastern plateaus at elevations ranging from near sea level along the Colorado River to about about 5 000 HABITAT Biotic communities including Sonoran Desertscrub Great Basin Desertscrub Semidesert Grassland Interior Chaparral and woodlands are home to this lizard It is usually encountered on lower slopes bajadas plains and low valleys often in the branches of trees or in the vicinity of ground cover such as wood piles rock piles and packrat nests BEHAVIOR This diurnal lizard basks on the branches of trees on rocks or on other sunlit perches When encountered it is often heard before it is seen as it scratches and claws the bark en route to the opposite side of the trunk or branch It flees down into the inner tangles of pack rat nests rock crevices or burrows when threatened It has a strong jaw and often bites when captured It hibernates during the cold months of winter and late fall DIET The Desert Spiny Lizard feeds on a variety of insects including ants beetles and caterpillars It also feeds on spiders centipedes small lizards and some plant material REPRODUCTION It is often encountered in male female pairs Mating takes place in spring and summer and one or two clutches of eggs are laid in spring and summer Clutch size ranges from 2 to 12 eggs Hatchlings may appear as early as late May but usually begin to emerge in July By Thomas C Brennan Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C A T Holycross 2005 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Maricopa County Arizona Game

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Lizards-Subpages/h-s-magister.html (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Slevin's Bunchgrass Lizard (Sceloporus slevini) - Reptiles of Arizona
    have two blue bars on the belly The scales are pointed keeled and overlap like shingles The scale rows on the sides of the body are horizontal spines point straight back All other Sceloporus in Arizona have diagonal scale rows on the sides of the body spines point up and back DISTRIBUTION This lizard is found in several of the sky island mountain ranges of southeastern Arizona and in the valleys of eastern Santa Cruz County It ranges in elevation from about 4 300 in the valleys to over 9 000 on the peaks HABITAT Mountain populations inhabit Madrean Evergreen Woodland Petran Montane Conifer Forest and Petran Subalpine Conifer Forest communities In the valleys of eastern Santa Cruz County it is found in Plains Grassland It is usually encountered in open sunny areas with abundant bunch grass BEHAVIOR Primarily diurnal Can be active at any time of year on sunny and warm days It is often seen scurrying around on the ground between clumps of grass It also climbs up into tufts When threatened it often seeks shelter in the inner tangles of the grass DIET Slevin s Bunchgrass Lizard eats a variety of insects including true bugs ants beetles wasps and grasshoppers It also eats spiders REPRODUCTION This lizard mates in April and lays a clutch of up to 13 eggs in June July or August Hatchlings emerge in August and September REMARKS H eavy grazing has been linked to severe declines in populations of this lizard In southeastern Arizona grasslands it was found to be common in ungrazed areas but was virtually absent from adjacent grazed parcels By Thomas C Brennan Brennan T C A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Degenhardt W G Painter

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Lizards-Subpages/h-s-slevini.html (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Plateau Fence Lizard (Sceloporus tristichus) - Reptiles of Arizona
    appearance but the two are genetically distinct from one another DISTRIBUTION This lizard ranges across nearly all of northern and eastern Arizona Its boundary with the similar Southwestern Fence Lizard is poorly known In Arizona the Plateau Fence Lizard is found at elevations ranging from about 3 000 to 9 000 HABITAT A variety of biotic communities including Great Basin Desertscrub Plains and Great Basin Grassland Great Basin Conifer Woodland Madrean Evergreen Woodland and Petran Montane Conifer Forest are home to this lizard It inhabits low valleys grassy plains bajadas foothills rocky canyons and forested slopes It is usually encountered in relatively open sunlit areas with plenty of basking sites such as rock piles wood piles and fallen logs BEHAVIOR During the summer this diurnal lizard is most active mid morning and late afternoon In spring and fall it can be active all day long It forages on the ground but climbs onto rocks trees fence posts and wood piles to bask It hibernates during the cold months of winter and late fall DIET The Plateau Fence Lizard sits and waits for prey to wander within close proximity It feeds on a variety of insects including termites ants beetles grasshoppers flies larvae and wasps It also eats a variety of spiders snails and small lizards REPRODUCTION Mating begins in spring and continues into early summer One to 4 clutches of eggs are laid in late spring and summer Clutch size ranges from 1 to 10 eggs Hatchlings begin to emerge in June and continue to emerge through September By Thomas C Brennan Brennan T C A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C A T Holycross 2005 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Lizards-Subpages/h-s-tristichus.html (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Yellow-backed Spiny Lizard (Sceloporus uniformis) - Reptiles of Arizona
    northwestern Arizona at elevations ranging from about 150 m 500 to about 1 500 m 5 000 HABITAT The Yellow backed Spiny Lizard is found in Mohave and Great Basin desertscrub Great Basin Grassland Interior Chaparral and Great Basin Conifer Woodland communities It is often encountered along riparian corridors on the lower and more moderate mountain slopes bajadas plains and low valleys It basks on the branches of trees or on fence posts wood piles boulders rock piles and packrat nests BEHAVIOR This diurnal lizard is often heard before it is seen as it scratches and claws the tree bark en route to the opposite side of the trunk or branch It flees down into the inner tangles of pack rat nests rock crevices or burrows when threatened It has strong jaws and often bites when captured It hibernates during the cold months of winter and late fall DIET Prey consists of a variety of insects including ants beetles and caterpillars It also feeds on spiders centipedes small lizards and some plant material REPRODUCTION The Yellow backed Spiny Lizard is often encountered in male female pairs Mating takes place in spring and summer and one or two clutches of eggs are laid in spring and summer Clutch size ranges from 2 to 12 eggs Hatchlings begin to emerge in late July By Thomas C Brennan Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C A T Holycross 2005 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Maricopa County Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Degenhardt W G Painter C W and Price A H 1996 Amphibians and Reptiles of New Mexico University of New Mexico Press Albuquerque Phelan R L and

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Lizards-Subpages/h-s-uniformis.html (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Striped Plateau Lizard (Sceloporus virgatus) - Reptiles of Arizona
    patches may develop on the throat during breeding season spring Gravid females may develop orange coloration surrounding or replacing the blue patches on the throat Males are usually darker brown and often lack dorsal blotches Its lack of belly markings distinguishes this lizard from other Sceloporus found in the area The scales on the sides of the body are arranged in diagonal rows spines point up and back distinguishing this lizard from Slevin s Bunchgrass Lizard DISTRIBUTION In Arizona the Striped Plateau Lizard is found only in the Chiricahua and Peloncillo mountains It occurs at elevations ranging from about 4 800 to over 8 500 HABITAT The Striped Plateau Lizard inhabits Madrean Evergreen Woodland Petran Montane Conifer Forest and Petran Subalpine Conifer Forest communities This mountain dweller is usually encountered in relatively open sunlit areas along rocky canyon bottoms and slopes BEHAVIOR This diurnal lizard is primarily a ground dweller but it climbs onto fallen logs and low rocks to bask Young animals can be active at any time of the year but winter activity is restricted to unseasonably warm and sunny days Adults hibernate during the cold months of winter and late fall It does not hesitate to climb onto trees to avoid capture Both males and females are territorial DIET Grasshoppers and a variety of other insects make up the diet of this lizard It has also been reported to eat centipedes REPRODUCTION Mating takes place in April and May and a single clutch of 5 to 15 eggs is laid in June or July Eggs are laid in an underground nest excavated from moist sunlit soil Hatchlings begin to emerge in August By Thomas C Brennan Brennan T C A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Lizards-Subpages/h-s-virgatus.html (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Yuman Fringe-toed Lizard (Uma rufopunctata) - Reptiles of Arizona
    traction a chisel shaped snout for burrowing a countersunk lower jaw interlocking eyelids flaps over the ear openings and valves in the nasal passages to keep sand out of the body The scales are very small and granular Its straight thin lines on the throat orange coloration on the belly during breeding season and dark lines on the neck and shoulders distinguish this lizard from the similar looking Mohave Fringe toed Lizard DISTRIBUTION This lizard is found in the valleys of the far southwestern corner of the state Its range extends to a few miles northeast of Dateland In our state it occurs at elevations ranging from near sea level to about 700 HABITAT This sand specialist occupies open dune fields and shrub invaded sand hummocks with at least sporadic open patches of fine wind blown sand It occurs within the Lower Colorado River subdivision of the Sonoran Desertscrub community BEHAVIOR Active during the day Often encountered basking on the warm sand in the mid morning sun Hibernates underground during the cold months of winter and late fall A speedy ground dwelling lizard that runs on its hind limbs at top speeds When threatened it often runs a short distance and then wriggles under the sand chisel shaped snout first It also uses existing burrows for shelter DIET The Yuman Fringe toed Lizard eats a variety of insects spiders small lizards and some plant material including flowers and buds Captive specimens have been observed to eat their own shed skin REPRODUCTION This lizard m ates in spring and lays one or more clutches of eggs in spring and summer Before coupling the male vibrates his head in a series of rapid bobs performs push ups and flattens his body from side to side The female crawls under the male s

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Lizards-Subpages/h-u-rufopunctata.html (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Mohave Fringe-toed Lizard (Uma scoparia) - Reptiles of Arizona
    pointed scales on each hind toe to increase traction a chisel shaped snout for burrowing a countersunk lower jaw interlocking eyelids flaps over the ear openings and valves in the nasal passages to keep sand out of the body The scales are very small and granular The crescent shaped lines on the throat of this lizard its lack of orange bars on the belly and its lack of dark lines on the shoulders distinguish it from the similar looking Yuman Fringe toed Lizard DISTRIBUTION This lizard is found in a few small parcels along the west central border of the state It is known from the the vicinity of Parker and areas to the south and southeast In our state it occurs at elevations ranging from about 300 to 2 500 HABITAT This sand specialist occupies open dune fields and shrub invaded sand hummocks with at least sporadic open patches of fine wind blown sand It occurs within the Lower Colorado River subdivision of the Sonoran Desertscrub community BEHAVIOR Active during the day Often encountered basking on the warm sand in the mid morning sun Hibernates underground during the cold months of winter and late fall A speedy ground dwelling lizard that runs on its hind limbs at top speeds When threatened it often runs a short distance and then wriggles under the sand chisel shaped snout first It also uses existing burrows for shelter DIET The Mohave Fringe toed Lizard eats a variety of insects spiders and some plant material including flowers and seeds REPRODUCTION This lizard m ates in spring and lays one or more clutches of eggs in spring and summer Clutch size ranges from 1 to 5 eggs Eggs are buried in a shallow moist nest within the sand By Thomas C Brennan Brennan T C

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Lizards-Subpages/h-u-scoparia.html (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive