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  • Striped Whipsnake (Coluber taeniatus) - Reptiles of Arizona
    coloration under its tail distinguish this snake from the similar looking Sonoran Whipsnake DISTRIBUTION This snake is an inhabitant of Arizona s northern plateaus and central mountains Isolated populations occur in the Kofa Mountains of Yuma County and in Graham County s Santa Teresa and Pinaleño mountains It is found at elevations ranging from 2 800 to about 7 500 HABITAT The Striped Whipsnake is primarily an inhabitant of Interior Chaparral Great Basin Conifer Woodland Plains Grassland and Great Basin Grassland communities It also enters the lower reaches of Petran Montane Conifer Forest in some areas In the Kofa mountains of Yuma County it occurs in Arizona Upland Sonoran Desertscrub It inhabits a wide variety of terrain types including canyons steep slopes foothills open plains open plateaus and riparian corridors BEHAVIOR This diurnal very fast moving and alert snake is often seen cruising for food in the mid morning sun It often hunts with its head elevated off the ground It is a good climber that often retreats into the branches of trees when threatened It h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter It does not hesitate to bite when captured DIET It actively forages for lizards snakes mice and other small mammals birds frogs and a variety of insects REPRODUCTION Mating takes place in spring and a clutch of up to 12 eggs is laid in late spring or early summer Hatchlings begin to emerge in August By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2005 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Maricopa

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-c-taeniatus.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Ring-necked Snake (Diadophis punctatus) - Reptiles of Arizona
    include the Virgin Mts lower Grand Canyon Hualapai Mts and Black Mts Another potentially isolated population exists in the Kofa Mts of Yuma County In our state this snake has been found at elevations ranging from ca 2 200 in the low desert ranges of western Arizona to ca 7 000 above the Mogollon Rim HABITAT It is found in communities ranging from Mohave Desertscrub and Sonoran Desertscrub into Petran Montane Conifer Forest This snake is encountered on grassy slopes bajadas foothills canyon bottoms and low valleys In the more arid parts of the state it is usually found near drainages springs and riparian corridors BEHAVIOR The Ring necked Snake is a primarily diurnal and crepuscular ground dweller It is usually active in the mid morning or near dusk avoiding the hottest part of the day It can be found at any time of day during cloudy and mild conditions This snake h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter When threatened it sometimes coils the tail into a shield presenting the bright red underside Captured individuals often drool from the corner of the mouth possibly the result of the secretion of venom DIET Mild venom delivered by enlarged rear teeth in the upper jaw is used to subdue prey which includes a variety of snakes lizards and insects REPRODUCTION Mating takes place in spring A clutch of up to 18 eggs is laid in late spring or early summer By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2005 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-d-punctatus.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Chihuahuan Hook-nosed Snake (Gyalopion canum) - Reptiles of Arizona
    000 HABITAT It is primarily associated with Chihuahuan Desertscrub and Semidesert Grassland communities but it is also encountered in Madrean Evergreen Woodland In Arizona this snake is most frequently encountered on gentle sloping bajadas or in low foothills with rocky or gravelly soil grown with creosotebush or grasses It is also occasionally encountered in the lower reaches of mountainous terrain along ridges and in canyons BEHAVIOR This secretive ground dweller spends most of its time below the surface of the soil in burrows It is primarily nocturnal and evening crepuscular when surface active It is also occasionally encountered during the day in cloudy or mild conditions Encounters are often associated with recent rains It h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter This snake is rarely seen in Arizona because of its fossorial nature but when conditions are favorable for surface activity it is not uncommon to encounter more than one on a single outing When threatened it exhibits several defensive behaviors including jerking the body from side to side striking with mouth closed and making a popping noise by forcefully everting the lining of the cloaca It presumably uses its hooked snout to root through surface debris and under rocks for prey DIET The Chihuahuan Hook nosed Snake feeds on small spiders insects centipedes and scorpions Captive specimens have also eaten snakes lizards and small mice REPRODUCTION A clutch of up to 4 eggs is laid in late spring or early summer By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Degenhardt W G Painter C W and Price A H 1996 Amphibians and

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-g-canum.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Thornscrub Hook-nosed Snake (Gyalopion quadrangulare) - Reptiles of Arizona
    spots mark the black saddles on the tapered lateral aspects A black mask crosses the top of the head and covers the eyes The ventral surface is pale cream The pupils are round and the scales are smooth and shiny The scale on the snout rostral is concave on top and noticeably upturned along the leading edge The subcaudal scales are bifid divided distinguishing this snake from the Long nosed Snake DISTRIBUTION This snake only enters Arizona in a small portion of Santa Cruz County near the border with Mexico In our state it is found at elevations between 3 500 and 5 500 HABITAT In Arizona this snake inhabits rolling mesquite covered hills and oak lined drainages within the Madrean Evergreen Woodland and Semidesert Grassland communities It is usually encountered in areas with gravelly soil BEHAVIOR This secretive ground dweller spends most of it s time burrowed underneath the soil It is primarily nocturnal but occasionally encountered on the surface just before sunset Encounters are often associated with recent rains DIET It presumably uses its hooked snout to root through surface debris and under rocks and logs for prey which consists of scorpions spiders and a variety of insects REPRODUCTION Reproductive behavior is poorly known It lays clutches of up to 6 eggs By Thomas C Brennan Babb R D G L Bradley T C Brennan A T Holycross 2005 A preliminary assessment of the diet of Gyalopion quadrangulare Serpentes Colubridae Southwestern Naturalist 50 3 Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Fowlie 1965 The Snakes of Arizona Azul Quinta Press Fallbrook California Stebbins 1985 Western Reptiles and Amphibians

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-g-quadrangulare.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Mexican Hog-nosed Snake (Heterodon kennerlyi) - Reptiles of Arizona
    It is typically found in open valleys flatlands rolling plains and gentle bajadas BEHAVIOR The Mexican Hog nosed Snake is normally active from May through October in Arizona It is a slow moving primarily diurnal and crepuscular ground dweller that is occasionally active into the night during particularly warm periods Its plow like snout and shortened head body and tail are adaptations for burrowing It uses its snout to unearth prey bury itself for temporary shelter and create deeper habitually used shelter burrows It probably h ibernates singly in a burrow below the frost line during the cold months of late fall and winter When threatened this snake may remain motionless or it may try to escape The next line of defense is bluffing followed by death feigning Bluffing consists of inflating the body flattening the neck and posterior head coiling the tail elevating the head and neck and making repeated false strikes each accompanied by a sharp hiss Although dramatic bluffing is purely defensive and H kennerlyi rarely bites If bluffing fails to alleviate the threat the snake may feign death by turning belly up gaping the mouth extending the tongue expelling foul smelling waste and then remaining motionless While death feigning some snakes regurgitate hemorrhage from the lining of the mouth and smear the body with feces and blood DIET Prey is located by smell and sight The shovel like snout is used to root around in the soil for prey which includes toads frogs lizards small snakes rodents reptile eggs salamanders hatchling turtles birds and their eggs and insects There are two enlarged teeth on the posterior of each upper jaw bone maxilla which are used to inject a mild venom into prey The venom might be mildly toxic to humans Prey is grasped by the jaws

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-h-kennerlyi.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Desert Nightsnake (Hypsiglena chlorophaea) - Reptiles of Arizona
    DISTRIBUTION This snake is distributed across most of western and southern Arizona and across the northern borderlands It is found ar elevations ranging from sea level to about 8 500 HABITAT The Desert Nightsnake inhabits a wide variety of biotic communities ranging from hot and dry Lower Colorado River Sonoran Desertscrub through the grasslands and woodlands and into cool Petran Montane Conifer Forest It is found in an equally wide variety of terrain types ranging from the flat open sandy deserts to steep rocky wooded slopes It seems to be most abundant in moderate terrain within desertscrub and grassland communities BEHAVIOR This strictly nocturnal snake h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter It is often encountered on remote roadways at night It is mildly venomous but rarely bites when captured and its venom is not considered to be dangerous to humans DIET The Desert Nightsnake uses mild venom injected by enlarged teeth in the rear upper jaw to subdue lizards and small snakes It also eats reptile eggs frogs and a variety of insects REPRODUCTION Mating takes place in spring and a clutch of up to 9 eggs is laid in spring or summer By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2005 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Maricopa County Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Degenhardt W G Painter C W and Price A H 1996 Amphibians and Reptiles of New Mexico University of New Mexico Press Albuquerque Fowlie 1965 The Snakes of Arizona Azul Quinta Press Fallbrook California Lowe Schwalbe

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-h-chlorophaea.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Chihuahuan Nightsnake (Hypsiglena jani) - Reptiles of Arizona
    southern portion of the Colorado Plateau in northeastern Arizona and in sub Mogollon Rim southeastern Arizona It is found at elevations ranging from about 3 000 to about 8 500 HABITAT The Chihuahuan Nightsnake inhabits a wide variety of biotic communities ranging from Sonoran Desertscrub and Chihuahuan Desertscrub through grasslands and woodlands and into cool Petran Montane Conifer Forest It is found in an equally wide variety of terrain types ranging from the flat open deserts to steep rocky wooded slopes It seems to be most abundant in moderate terrain within desertscrub and grassland communities BEHAVIOR This strictly nocturnal snake h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter When persistently harassed it often coils into a tight spiraled shield or cone with the head tucked tightly against the center of the spiral It is often encountered on remote roadways at night It is mildly venomous but rarely bites when captured and its venom is not considered to be dangerous to humans DIET The Chihuahuan Nightsnake uses mild venom injected by enlarged teeth in the rear upper jaw to subdue lizards and small snakes It also eats reptile eggs frogs and a variety of insects REPRODUCTION Mating probably takes place in spring and a clutch of up to 9 eggs is laid in spring or summer By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2005 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Maricopa County Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Degenhardt W G Painter C W and Price A H 1996 Amphibians and Reptiles of New

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-h-jani.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Hooded Nightsnake (Hypsiglena sp.) - Reptiles of Arizona
    elevations ranging from about 3 000 to about 8 500 HABITAT The Hooded Nightsnake is found in biotic communities ranging from Sonoran Desertscrub through the grasslands and woodlands and into cool Petran Montane Conifer Forest It is found in an equally wide variety of terrain types ranging from flat open desert to steep rocky wooded slopes It seems to be most abundant in moderate terrain within desertscrub and Semidesert Grassland communities BEHAVIOR This strictly nocturnal snake h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter It is often encountered on remote roadways at night It is mildly venomous but rarely bites when captured and its venom is not considered to be dangerous to humans DIET The Hooded Nightsnake uses mild venom injected by enlarged teeth in the rear upper jaw to subdue lizards and small snakes It also eats reptile eggs frogs and a variety of insects REPRODUCTION Mating probably takes place in spring and a clutch of up to about 9 eggs is laid in spring or summer REMARKS This newly discovered species has not yet been named Mulcahy 2008 By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2005 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Maricopa County Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Degenhardt W G Painter C W and Price A H 1996 Amphibians and Reptiles of New Mexico University of New Mexico Press Albuquerque Fowlie 1965 The Snakes of Arizona Azul Quinta Press Fallbrook California Lowe Schwalbe Johnson 1986 The Venomous Reptiles of Arizona Nongame Branch Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-h-sp.html (2016-02-01)
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