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  • Eastern Patch-nosed Snake (Salvadora grahamiae) - Reptiles of Arizona
    Patch nosed Snake DISTRIBUTION This snake is found in the sky island ranges of southeastern Arizona and in the higher ranges below the eastern half of the Mogollon Rim It occurs at elevations ranging from about 4 500 to over 6 500 HABITAT In Arizona the Eastern Patch nosed Snake inhabits Madrean Evergreen Woodland Great Basin Conifer Woodland and the upper reaches of Interior Chaparral communities It is usually found in hilly or mountainous terrain above the flatlands BEHAVIOR This is an alert and fast moving diurnal snake It h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter It is primarily a ground dweller but it occasionally climbs into shrubs DIET It a ctively forages for lizards snakes mice and other small mammals reptile eggs and birds REPRODUCTION Mating takes place in spring and a clutch of up to 10 eggs is laid in summer Hatchlings begin to emerge in August By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Degenhardt W G Painter C W

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-s-grahamiae.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Western Patch-nosed Snake (Salvidora hexalepis) - Reptiles of Arizona
    smooth The irregular edges and mottling of this snakes dorsal stripes and its additional side stripes distinguish it from the similar looking Eastern Patch nosed Snake which has solid straight edged dorsal stripes and usually lacks side stripes DISTRIBUTION This snake is found across all of southern Arizona below the Mogollon Rim the western edge of the state and into the deserts of the northern plateau region It occurs at elevations ranging from near sea level along the Colorado river to about 6 500 HABITAT It is found in flatlands low valleys rocky bajadas foothills and mountain slopes in biotic communities ranging from Arizona s low desertscrubs up into the woodlands BEHAVIOR This alert and fast moving diurnal snake h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter It is primarily a ground dweller but it occasionally climbs into shrubs DIET The Western Patch nosed Snake a ctively forages for lizards mice and other small mammals reptile eggs and birds REPRODUCTION Mating takes place in spring and a clutch of up to 12 eggs is laid in late spring or summer Hatchlings begin to emerge in July SUBSPECIES FOUND IN AZ BIG BEND PATCH NOSED SNAKE Salvadora hexalepis deserticola This subspecies usually has orange or peach coloration DESERT PATCH NOSED SNAKE Salvadora hexalepis hexalepis MOHAVE PATCH NOSED SNAKE Salvadora hexalepis mojavensis The stripes of this subspecies are usually broken up and less distinct By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2005 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Maricopa County Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-s-hexalepis.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Green Ratsnake (Senticolis triaspis) - Reptiles of Arizona
    southeastern Arizona In our state it occurs at elevations ranging from about 3 600 to exposed south facing slopes at about 8 000 HABITAT The Green Ratsnake is primarily an inhabitant of Madrean Evergreen Woodland and the upper reaches of adjoining Semidesert Grassland communities It is often encountered on relatively exposed steep rocky slopes and along drainages at the bases of such slopes BEHAVIOR Primarily diurnal and crepuscular It may spend some time foraging in the branches of trees and bushes but it spends the majority of its time on the ground It shelters under large rocks boulders rock piles and outcroppings In Arizona it h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter When encountered this snake often remains motionless presumably to avoid detection DIET This is a relatively powerful constrictor that eats small mammals lizards birds and bats REPRODUCTION Mating takes place in spring and a clutch off up to 9 eggs is laid in late spring or early summer By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-s-triaspis.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Groundsnake (Sonora semiannulata) - Reptiles of Arizona
    looking Western Shovel nosed Snake Each lateral scale usually has a dark spot on the anterior edge distinguishing this snake from the Variable Sandsnake The underside is plain cream distinguishing this snake from our black headed snakes which have orange red coloration on the belly The scales are smooth and shiny and the pupils are round DISTRIBUTION This snake is distributed across western and most of southern Arizona at elevations ranging from near sea level along the Colorado River to about 5 000 HABITAT It is found in a wide variety of communities including Arizona s desertscrubs Semidesert Grassland Interior Chaparral Plains and Great Basin Grassland and the lower reaches of the woodlands It occupies steep rocky canyons and slopes gentle bajadas foothills and low valleys This harmless snake is commonly encountered in yards in the Phoenix metropolitan area BEHAVIOR This ground dweller can be active at any time of the day or night in mild conditions Desert populations are primarily nocturnal during the hot summer months It is usually dormant during the cold months roughly late November into February DIET The Groundsnake eats a variety of insects spiders scorpions centipedes and lizards REPRODUCTION Males combat each other for access to females during mating season Mating takes place in spring and a clutch of up to six eggs is laid in late spring or early summer By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2005 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Maricopa County Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Degenhardt W G Painter C W and Price

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-s-semiannulata.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Smith's Black-headed Snake (Tantilla hobartsmithi) - Reptiles of Arizona
    Interior Chaparral Madrean Evergreen Woodland and Great Basin Conifer Woodland It is usually found above the flatlands on rocky bajadas foothills mountain canyons and on the higher banks along riparian corridors BEHAVIOR This secretive nocturnal ground dweller spends the majority of its time beneath the surface of the ground It is occasionally encountered on the surface at night Most near surface activity seems to occur on moist spring days when it is often found under rocks logs and surface debris It h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter DIET Venom is delivered to prey via enlarged grooved teeth in the rear upper jaw not considered to be dangerous to humans It eats a variety of invertebrates including centipedes scorpions beetle larvae and other insects REPRODUCTION A clutch of up to 3 eggs is laid in summer By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2005 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Maricopa County Arizona

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-t-hobartsmithi.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Plains Black-headed Snake (Tantilla nigriceps) - Reptiles of Arizona
    Madrean Evergreen Woodland communities It is usually found below the steep terrain on gently sloping bajadas and low valley bottoms BEHAVIOR This secretive nocturnal ground dweller is occasionally encountered on the surface at night but spends the majority of its time in underground burrows Most near surface activity seems to occur on moist spring and summer days when this snake can be found under rocks logs and surface debris It h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter DIET Venom is delivered to prey via enlarged grooved teeth in the rear upper jaw not considered to be dangerous to humans It eats a variety of invertebrates including centipedes scorpions beetle larvae and other insects REPRODUCTION A clutch of up to 3 eggs is laid in late spring or early summer Hatchlings begin to emerge in summer By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Degenhardt W G Painter C W and Price A H 1996 Amphibians and Reptiles of New Mexico University of New

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-t-nigriceps.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Chihuahuan Black-headed Snake (Tantilla wilcoxi) - Reptiles of Arizona
    extends down to the corner of the mouth and a small white patch marks each cheek just behind the eye The belly is cream anteriorly grading to light pink or orange posteriorly This snakes coloration and lack of dark markings on the belly distinguish it from the similar looking Ring necked Snake The scales are smooth and the small head is barely distinct from the neck There are enlarged grooved teeth in the rear upper jaw DISTRIBUTION This snake is known from the Santa Rita Patagonia and Huachuca mountains of southeastern Arizona It is found at elevations ranging from about 3 000 to 8 000 HABITAT It inhabits Madrean Evergreen Woodland and Petran Montane Conifer Forest communities Most specimens are found in heavily wooded canyons with abundant leaf litter and canopy cover BEHAVIOR This secretive ground dweller spends most of its time burrowed under rocks logs and leaf litter where it presumably forages for invertebrate prey Most near surface activity seems to occur on moist spring days It h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter DIET Venom is delivered to prey via enlarged grooved teeth in the rear upper jaw not considered to be dangerous to humans It feeds on a variety of invertebrates REPRODUCTION Reproductive behavior is poorly known It probably lays a small clutch 4 of eggs in summer By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Fowlie 1965 The Snakes of Arizona Azul Quinta Press Fallbrook California Lowe Schwalbe Johnson 1986 The Venomous Reptiles of Arizona Nongame Branch Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Stebbins 1985 Western Reptiles and Amphibians

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-t-wilcoxi.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Yaqui Black-headed Snake (Tantilla yaquia) - Reptiles of Arizona
    the eye The belly is cream anteriorly grading to light pink or orange posteriorly The scales are smooth and the small head is barely distinct from the neck There are enlarged grooved teeth in the rear upper jaw DISTRIBUTION This snake is known from the Canelo Hills and the Pajarito Atascosa Santa Rita Mule Chiricahua Swisshelm Pedregosa and Peloncillo mountains of southeastern Arizona In Arizona it is found at elevations ranging from 3 300 to about 6 000 HABITAT It is found in Madrean Evergreen Woodland and Semidesert Grassland communities It is usually found in rocky wooded canyons and on neighboring slopes BEHAVIOR This secretive nocturnal ground dweller spends most of its time burrowed under rocks logs and leaf litter It is occasionally encountered on the surface on moist nights Most near surface activity seems to occur under cover on moist spring days It h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter DIET Venom is delivered to prey via enlarged grooved teeth in the rear upper jaw not considered to be dangerous to humans It forages under rocks and leaf litter for a variety of invertebrates REPRODUCTION Reproductive behavior is poorly known It p robably lays a small clutch 4 of eggs in summer By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Degenhardt W G Painter C W and Price A H 1996 Amphibians and Reptiles of New Mexico University of New Mexico Press Albuquerque Fowlie 1965 The Snakes of Arizona Azul Quinta Press Fallbrook California Lowe Schwalbe Johnson 1986 The Venomous Reptiles of Arizona Nongame Branch Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-t-yaquia.html (2016-02-01)
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