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  • Black-necked Gartersnake (Thamnophis cyrtopsis) - Reptiles of Arizona
    dark areas between the stripes on the anterior portion of the body The underside is plain pale gray or cream Dark bars mark the seams of the upper lip scales upper labials The pupils are round and the dorsal scales are keeled DISTRIBUTION This snake is found across southeastern and central Arizona An isolated population exists in the Ajo Mountains of western Pima County In Arizona it ranges in elevation from 1 100 in the Phoenix basin to about 7 000 in Mogollon Rim country HABITAT It i nhabits a wide variety of biotic communities including Sonoran Desertscrub Semidesert Grassland Interior Chaparral Madrean Evergreen Woodland Great Basin Conifer Woodland Plains Grassland Great Basin Grassland and Petran Montane Conifer Forest It is usually found near water in rocky upland canyons and along semi permanent streams and drainages It occasionally wanders far from water BEHAVIOR Although primarily diurnal and crepuscular it is occasionally active on warm nights It is often encountered mid morning or late afternoon foraging for tadpoles in shallow water It h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter DIET In addition to tadpoles this snake eats frogs toads lizards salamanders earthworms and invertebrates REPRODUCTION It gives birth to up to up to 25 young in late spring or summer By Thomas C Brenn an Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2005 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Maricopa County Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Degenhardt W G Painter C W and Price A H 1996 Amphibians and Reptiles of New Mexico University of New

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-t-cyrtopsis.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Terrestrial Gartersnake (Thamnophis elegans) - Reptiles of Arizona
    stripes The underside is light gray or cream occasionally with flecks of brown or orange The pupils are round and the dorsal scales are keeled DISTRIBUTION This snake is found across most of northern and northeastern Arizona Isolated populations exist in the Sierra Ancha of Gila County and the Pinaleño Mountains of Graham County In Arizona it occurs at elevations ranging from about 4 800 to over 9 000 HABITAT It is found in a wide variety of communities including Great Basin Desertscrub Plains and Great Basin Grassland Great Basin Conifer Woodland Petran Montane Conifer Forest and Petran Subalpine Conifer Forest It seems to be most abundant in the vicinity of water such as streams stock tanks and lakes but is also found in open forest meadows and grasslands far from standing water BEHAVIOR This primarily diurnal snake h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter It forages on the ground and in the water for a wide variety of prey items DIET The Terrestrial Gartersnake feeds on fish amphibians lizards small mammals birds insects snails worms snakes and leeches REPRODUCTION Mating takes place in spring and a litter of up to 27 young is born in July August or September SUBSPECIES FOUND IN AZ WANDERING GARTERSNAKE Thamnophis elegans vagrans ARIZONA WANDERING GARTERSNAKE Thamnophis elegans arizonae By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Degenhardt W G Painter C W and Price A H 1996 Amphibians and Reptiles of New Mexico University of New Mexico Press Albuquerque Fowlie 1965 The Snakes of Arizona Azul Quinta Press Fallbrook California Stebbins 1985 Western Reptiles and Amphibians

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-t-elegans.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Mexican Gartersnake (Thamnophis eques) - Reptiles of Arizona
    now absent from much of its historic range in Arizona It was once found in many of the sub Mogollon Rim drainage systems across the central portion of Arizona and several drainage systems in south central and southeastern Arizona It remains in only a few isolated populations below the rim and in south central Arizona Elevation ranges from about 1 000 to about 6 700 HABITAT It is usually found in or near rivers streams and ciénegas in communities ranging from Arizona Upland Sonoran Desertscrub through Semidesert Grassland and the woodlands into Petran Montane Conifer Forest BEHAVIOR This primarily diurnal snake often forages in the mid morning sun It h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter When encountered it is quick to dive under the water When persistently harassed it has been observed to tuck the head down against the ground and under the coils hold the head and fore body motionless and crawl the wiggling tail away from the body author obs This behavior may be serve to divert a predators attention away from the head and to the tail DIET The Mexican Gartersnake eats frogs toads fish lizards and small mammals REPRODUCTION Mating takes place in spring and young are born in June and July REMARKS Protected in Arizona It is against Arizona State law to harass harm pursue hunt shoot wound kill trap capture or collect this animal or to attempt to engage in any such conduct By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2005 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-t-eques.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Checkered Gartersnake (Thamnophis marcianus) - Reptiles of Arizona
    Each eye is sandwiched between two vertical white bars with black edges The underside is light cream yellow or gray The pupils are round and the dorsal scales are keeled DISTRIBUTION This snake is found across the valleys of southeastern Arizona It also follows agriculture and riparian corridors into portions of south central Arizona around Casa Grande Phoenix Fort McDowell Buckeye and Gila Bend A population that might be isolated occurs in agricultural areas south of Yuma along the Colorado River In Arizona it ranges in elevation from sea level to over 5 000 HABITAT Semidesert Grassland Chihuahuan Desertscrub Sonoran Desertscrub and the lower reaches of Madrean Evergreen Woodland communities are home to this snake It is a lowland species that inhabits valleys flatlands and broad low riparian corridors Although it is not restricted to areas with permanent water it seems to be most abundant in the vicinity of ponds moist grasslands tanks drainages irrigated areas and rivers BEHAVIOR It can be active at any time of night or day when conditions are favorable It h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter When captured it often expels a foul smelling musk from the cloaca DIET This dietary generalist actively forages for frogs toads tadpoles lizards salamanders snakes small mammals fish and insects REPRODUCTION U p to 35 young are born in spring or summer By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2005 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Maricopa County Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Degenhardt W G Painter C W

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-t-marcianus.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Narrow-headed Gartersnake (Thamnophis rufipunctatus) - Reptiles of Arizona
    are keeled DISTRIBUTION This snake is found along and below central Arizona s Mogollon Rim at elevations ranging from ca 2 200 to 8 000 Many Arizona populations are in decline and some populations may already be extirpated Possible threats include introduced crayfish introduced predatory fish streamside cattle grazing heavy recreational use of streams and water diversions HABITAT It is usually encountered in or near clear rocky streams or rivers in communities ranging from Arizona Upland Sonoran Desertscrub through Petran Montane Conifer Forest BEHAVIOR This highly aquatic diurnal and evening crepuscular snake forages underwater and basks on banks and in the branches of willows that overhang the water It has been observed author obs foraging in the water well after sunset on several occasions It shelters and thermoregulates under streamside rocks and in streamside crevices It hibernates in rocky outcroppings high above the flood line during the cold months of late fall and winter When encountered it is often quick to dive under the water and seek shelter under the rocks on the bed of the stream DIET The Narrow headed Gartersnake eats fish including dace chubs and both native and introduced trout It may occasionally prey on salamanders It has also been observed eating Smallmouth Bass on one occasion REPRODUCTION Mating takes place in the spring and up to 18 young are born in summer REMARKS Protected in Arizona It is against Arizona State law to harass harm pursue hunt shoot wound kill trap capture or collect this animal or to attempt to engage in any such conduct By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-t-rufipunctatus.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Sonoran Lyresnake (Trimorphodon lambda) - Reptiles of Arizona
    lower Grand Canyon The Black Mountains of Mohave County and the Kofa mountains of Yuma County In Arizona this snake occurs at elevations ranging from just a few hundred feet above sea level to over 5 000 HABITAT It is found in a variety of biotic communities in Arizona including Sonoran Mohave and Chihuahuan desertscrubs Semidesert Grassland Interior Chaparral Great Basin Conifer Woodland Madrean Evergreen Woodland and the lower reaches of Petran Montane Conifer Forest It is usually encountered in rocky habitat above the flats It frequents boulder strewn hillsides steep slopes and rocky canyons BEHAVIOR This snake is nocturnal but it can be found basking in sun warmed rock crevices on warm days in spring and fall It h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter It is chiefly a ground dweller but is capable of climbing Although this snake usually does not bite when captured it is capable of injecting mild venom with enlarged grooved teeth in the rear portion of its upper jaw Bites to humans reportedly cause mild swelling and irritation DIET The Western Lyresnake uses its venom to subdue lizards small mammals bats and birds It also has the ability to constrict its prey REPRODUCTION A clutch of up to 20 eggs is laid in late summer REMARKS The Sonoran Lyresnake apparently hybridizes with the Chihuahuan Lyresnake Trimorphodon vilkinsonii in extreme southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2005 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Maricopa County Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-t-lambda.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Sonoran Coralsnake (Micruroides euryxanthus) - Reptiles of Arizona
    Its distribution in the low deserts of western Arizona is spotty and poorly known HABITAT The Sonoran Coral Snake is found in communities ranging form Sonoran Mohave and Chihuahuan desertscrubs through Semidesert Grassland and into the lower reaches of the woodlands It is usually encountered above the flats in or near rocky or gravelly drainages mesquite lined washes and canyons BEHAVIOR This ground dwelling snake is primarily nocturnal or crepuscular but it can be active around the clock when conditions are favorable It hibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter When threatened this snake hides its head beneath the coils curls and presents the tail exposing the bright red cloacal scute and makes a popping noise by everting the lining of the cloaca This display is presumably designed to divert the predator s attention to the tail instead of the head DIET Like other Elapids this snake feeds primarily on ectotherms It uses its neurotoxic venom to subdue a variety of small snakes including threadsnakes groundsnake s and black headed snakes It also occasionally feeds on small lizards REPRODUCTION A clutch of up to 3 eggs is laid during the summer monsoon July August REMARKS T his is Arizona s only representative from the Elapidae a family of snakes that includes mambas cobras kraits and taipans It delivers neurotoxic venom through fixed hollow fangs in the front of the mouth There have been no reported deaths from its bite in Arizona but this snake should be considered dangerous and should not be handled By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Brennan T C

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-m-euryxanthus.html (2016-02-01)
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  • New Mexico Threadsnake (Leptotyphlops dissectus) - Reptiles of Arizona
    upper jaw and only a few teeth in the lower jaw The presence of three scales across top of the head between the oculars distinguishes this snake from the similar looking Western Threadsnake which has only one scale between the oculars DISTRIBUTION This snake is found in the southeastern corner of the state at elevations ranging from about 2 800 to over 5 000 HABITAT It occurs in Chihuahuan Desertscrub Semidesert Grassland and the lower reaches of Madrean Evergreen Woodland communities It also enters Arizona Upland Sonoran Desertscrub in portions of Graham County This snake is usually found below steep terrain on bajadas rolling foothills and in low valleys BEHAVIOR The New Mexico Threadsnake is primarily nocturnal and crepuscular It spends the majority of its time underground It is occasionally encountered on the surface crossing roadways on warm spring evenings It h ibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter When captured this snake exhibits defensive behaviors that include writhing releasing musk and poking with its harmless tail spine DIET It forages underground for ants termites other small insects and spiders It locates prey by following ant scent trails to the nest REPRODUCTION Mating probably occurs in spring A clutch of up to 8 eggs is laid in summer This snake occasionally nests communally and females tend to their eggs By Thomas C Brennan Bartlett 2000 Snakes of North America Western Region Gulf Publishing Co Houston TX Brennan T C and A T Holycross 2006 A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Arizona Arizona Game and Fish Department Phoenix AZ Degenhardt W G Painter C W and Price A H 1996 Amphibians and Reptiles of New Mexico University of New Mexico Press Albuquerque Fowlie 1965 The Snakes of Arizona Azul Quinta Press Fallbrook California Stebbins 1985 Western

    Original URL path: http://www.reptilesofaz.org/Snakes-Subpages/h-l-dissectus.html (2016-02-01)
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