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  • Royal Botanic Garden | Royal Botanic Garden in Jordan
    Plants Mushrooms Jordan Mushroom Project Jordan Plant Red List Research Library Library Donors Publications BOT ERA Project Community Development Investing in People Artisanal Workshop First Field Trip Sewing Trainees Graduate CIDA Funds the IGP Visiting an Art College Beekeeping Dairy Production Sustainable Living What is Sustainable Living Natural Materials Eco Building Ecodomes at the RBG Solar Cooking Composting Bioindicators Your Carbon Footprint Carbon Footprint Calculator SIDIG MED Project Events RBG Events Support us How You Can Help Donate You are here Home The Garden Plants in the Royal Botanic Garden We are currently compiling an online reference for the main plant species found in the habitats being re created at the Royal Botanic Garden More native plants are being added each week Browse through the plants already in the RBG database below For a full listing of the flora of Jordan please consult the Biodiversity in Jordan Database created by the RSCN Search for a plant by name Select Habitat Any Juniper Forest Habitat Pine Forest Habitat Freshwater Habitat Jordan Valley Habitat Deciduous Oak Forest Habitat Sort by Title Order Asc Desc Acacia albida Apple Ring Acacia Adonis microcarpa Small Pheasant s Eye Ajuga chia Chian Bugle Alcea setosa Bristly

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/plants/list (2016-02-14)
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  • Royal Botanic Garden Maps | Royal Botanic Garden
    in the Garden Maps Visitors Schools and Groups Garden Etiquette Volunteers Biodiversity Research Rangeland Rehabilitation Biomass Surveys Grazing Behaviour Forage Programmes Flock Management and Health Economic Studies on Herding Local Knowledge CBRR Info Day Forest Awareness Workshop 2nd Forest Awareness Workshop The National Herbarium What is a Herbarium Our Herbarium Collection Type Specimens Acquisition Policies How to Collect Plants Medicinal Plants Mushrooms Jordan Mushroom Project Jordan Plant Red List Research Library Library Donors Publications BOT ERA Project Community Development Investing in People Artisanal Workshop First Field Trip Sewing Trainees Graduate CIDA Funds the IGP Visiting an Art College Beekeeping Dairy Production Sustainable Living What is Sustainable Living Natural Materials Eco Building Ecodomes at the RBG Solar Cooking Composting Bioindicators Your Carbon Footprint Carbon Footprint Calculator SIDIG MED Project Events RBG Events Support us How You Can Help Donate You are here Home The Garden Royal Botanic Garden Maps Below is a map of the Royal Botanic Garden showing the location of the five Jordanian habitats that we are re creating in Tal Al Rumman Jordan More maps will be added to this page in the future when facilities such as our visitors centre pavilions research centre restaurant hiking trails and

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/garden-maps (2016-02-14)
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  • Visitors | Royal Botanic Garden
    How to Collect Plants Medicinal Plants Mushrooms Jordan Mushroom Project Jordan Plant Red List Research Library Library Donors Publications BOT ERA Project Community Development Investing in People Artisanal Workshop First Field Trip Sewing Trainees Graduate CIDA Funds the IGP Visiting an Art College Beekeeping Dairy Production Sustainable Living What is Sustainable Living Natural Materials Eco Building Ecodomes at the RBG Solar Cooking Composting Bioindicators Your Carbon Footprint Carbon Footprint Calculator SIDIG MED Project Events RBG Events Support us How You Can Help Donate You are here Home The Garden Visitors Schools and Groups Garden Etiquette We re Not Open Yet You will be able to visit the Royal Botanic Garden of Jordan relatively soon Many of our research and community development projects are well under way and we hope to open the Garden to the public in the not too distant future funding dependent For the time being however please do not show up at the Garden gate We will have to turn you away and you will feel disappointed We are not yet equipped to handle visitors You might wonder then why we have put these webpages online ahead of the Garden s official opening It s so you

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/page/visitors (2016-02-14)
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  • Schools and Groups | Royal Botanic Garden
    Info Day Forest Awareness Workshop 2nd Forest Awareness Workshop The National Herbarium What is a Herbarium Our Herbarium Collection Type Specimens Acquisition Policies How to Collect Plants Medicinal Plants Mushrooms Jordan Mushroom Project Jordan Plant Red List Research Library Library Donors Publications BOT ERA Project Community Development Investing in People Artisanal Workshop First Field Trip Sewing Trainees Graduate CIDA Funds the IGP Visiting an Art College Beekeeping Dairy Production Sustainable Living What is Sustainable Living Natural Materials Eco Building Ecodomes at the RBG Solar Cooking Composting Bioindicators Your Carbon Footprint Carbon Footprint Calculator SIDIG MED Project Events RBG Events Support us How You Can Help Donate You are here Home The Garden Visitors Schools and Groups Visitors Garden Etiquette We re Not Open Yet While the initial idea for the Royal Botanic Garden dates back more than a decade and our research studies have been under way for years the Royal Botanic Garden is not yet ready to open to the public That being said we have sometimes accommodated groups from schools companies or associations in the past when arrangements were made in advance However since construction is now under way and we are busily preparing for the opening of

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/page/schools-and-groups (2016-02-14)
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  • Garden Etiquette | Royal Botanic Garden
    Carbon Footprint Carbon Footprint Calculator SIDIG MED Project Events RBG Events Support us How You Can Help Donate You are here Home The Garden Visitors Garden Etiquette Visitors Schools and Groups Please help us protect and maintain the Garden by observing these Rules of Etiquette Plants seeds leaves flowers fruit herbs rocks and stones are all part of the ecosystem Please do not move or remove them Anyone visiting the Garden after you should see no trace of your passage Stay in designated areas and do not enter cultivated flower beds or other plant displays Visitors are welcome to take snapshots videos and journalistic individual or family photos Tripods or monopod usage is not allowed inside any buildings Photos and videos are not to be sold or used for commercial purposes without advanced project review and authorization Commercial projects will be approved on a case by case basis and fees may apply For more info please contact us If a visitor is asked by another person not to take pictures of that person or others accompanying that person the request must be honored to protect personal rights of privacy If a picture has already been taken it must be deleted upon request Picnicking is allowed only in designated areas All paper cans bottles and other trash must be placed in the trash bins provided Please do not litter The Garden is primarily a tobacco free environment Smoking is not allowed on RBG property buildings grounds restrooms and parking lots except in designated areas No radios or recorded music please The Garden is the place to get away from it all For safety reasons please supervise children at all times One adult should accompany every five children Wading and swimming streams or the reservoir is prohibited Please do not feed or

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/page/garden-etiquette (2016-02-14)
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  • Volunteering at the Royal Botanic Garden | Royal Botanic Garden
    Jordan Mushroom Project Jordan Plant Red List Research Library Library Donors Publications BOT ERA Project Community Development Investing in People Artisanal Workshop First Field Trip Sewing Trainees Graduate CIDA Funds the IGP Visiting an Art College Beekeeping Dairy Production Sustainable Living What is Sustainable Living Natural Materials Eco Building Ecodomes at the RBG Solar Cooking Composting Bioindicators Your Carbon Footprint Carbon Footprint Calculator SIDIG MED Project Events RBG Events Support us How You Can Help Donate You are here Home The Garden Volunteering at the Royal Botanic Garden People sometimes ask us if they can volunteer at the Royal Botanic Garden The short answer is Yes Ahlan wa sahlan If you re interested in volunteering please send an email to tell us a little about yourself why you would like to volunteer and how you want to help Remember to include your phone number and availability Internships for new graduates are available at the Royal Botanic Garden of Jordan Note that the RBG can provide transportation for volunteers between our office in Khalda and the Garden site in Tal Al Rumman Why Volunteer You get to meet new people and make new friends Volunteering promotes self growth You can use

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/page/volunteering-royal-botanic-garden (2016-02-14)
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  • Community-Based Rangeland Rehabilitation | Royal Botanic Garden
    experts in global innovation progress and ingenuity The Community Based Rangeland Rehabilitation programme CBRR was introduced in 2007 to relieve grazing pressure on the Royal Botanic Garden while optimizing the available range and maximizing biodiversity In the first year of the programme five families in the local pastoral community were involved In 2012 we now have 38 families participating When we started our work we needed to be able to restore plant cover conduct vegetation surveys and make biomass estimates at the Garden site without animals continuing to graze there Faced with local opposition we came up with a plan to supply replacement forage to the livestock owners who had habitually grazed the RBG site in return for them withdrawing their flocks The CBRR initiative was well received Livestock owners who once grazed the site down to bare earth are now policing themselves and others to protect the benefits they are reaping from the CBRR and the rapidly reviving ecosystem Controlled grazing studies on RBG land are giving our range scientist the opportunity to conduct studies on palatability and browsing behaviour to refine our understanding of the impact of grazing on specific plant species While it may at first seem counterintuitive to allow grazing on land that is to be conserved there is plentiful evidence that historically grazed habitats adapt and thrive under managed grazing Ultimately the CBRR s projects will be tailored to a variety of habitat types and habitat specific grazing protocols will be published for the region that maximize both the biodiversity of a given range and the productivity of the animals grazing on it The essential points of the CBRR programme are as follows Monitor species diversity and vegetation change over time Assist the pastoral community to improve productivity through better management Assess the carrying capacity of the site and the long term sustainability profile Develop a grazing regime and supplemental forage to meet the sustainability profile Balance herd sizes and carrying capacity Diversify income streams for herding families Gather and record local knowledge Articles Published by the CBRR Team Chemical Composition Analysis and Antimicrobial Screening of the Essential Oil of a Rare Plant from Jordan Ducrosia flabellifolia Mustafa Al Shudiefat Khalid Al Khalidi Ismail Abaza Fatma U Afifi Taylor Francis October 2013 Preferences of sheep when supplemented for forages in a Mediterranean rangeland management system Raed Al Tabini Derek W Bailey Khalid Al Khalidi Mostafa Shodiafat Rangeland Journal November 2013 Economic Development and Biodiversity Gain with Local Community Cooperation Ismaiel Abuamoud Raed Al Tabini Khalid Al Khalidi Mustafa Al Shudiefat Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development Vol 4 No 14 2013 Economic performance of small ruminant production in a protected area a case study from Tal Al Rumman a Mediterranean ecosystem in Jordan Khalid M Al Khalidi Amani A Alassaf Mustafa F Al Shudiefat Raed J Al Tabini Journal of Agricultural and Food Economics 1 8 2013 Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants commonly used by local Bedouins in the Badia region of Jordan Oraib Nawash

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/page/community-based-rangeland-rehabilitation (2016-02-14)
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  • Biomass Surveys | Royal Botanic Garden
    Community Development Investing in People Artisanal Workshop First Field Trip Sewing Trainees Graduate CIDA Funds the IGP Visiting an Art College Beekeeping Dairy Production Sustainable Living What is Sustainable Living Natural Materials Eco Building Ecodomes at the RBG Solar Cooking Composting Bioindicators Your Carbon Footprint Carbon Footprint Calculator SIDIG MED Project Events RBG Events Support us How You Can Help Donate You are here Home Biodiversity Research Rangeland Rehabilitation Biomass Surveys CBRR Grazing Behaviour Forage Programmes Flock Management Health Economic Studies Local Knowledge Publications During our baseline research for the Community Based Rangeland Rehabilitation project biomass surveys were conducted in April and May of 2008 2009 and 2010 The surveys obtained information on biomass production in the Garden used to calculate the site s carrying capacity determine the effect of grazing on biomass production and develop appropriate grazing management scenarios A method known as the transect technique was used to estimate biomass productivity The data obtained showed that the biomass in many sectors more than doubled in three years The doubling of the biomass throughout the site by 2010 was linked to the following factors Full site protection The local herders used to let their sheep graze in the site without permission especially in some sections where heavy grazing occurred In 2008 the RBG decided to involve the local community in the project to help them manage their flocks and ensure their cooperation in protecting the site Rainfall The data show high rainfall in 2009 and especially in 2010 considered the wettest season in 10 years Grazing The data proved that controlled grazing positively affects biomass production as it stimulates plants to re grow and produce edible leaves more than the woody parts especially for shrubs The study found that grazing should not exceed a moderate level in order to

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/page/biomass-surveys (2016-02-14)
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