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  • Grazing Behaviour | Royal Botanic Garden
    Herbarium What is a Herbarium Our Herbarium Collection Type Specimens Acquisition Policies How to Collect Plants Medicinal Plants Mushrooms Jordan Mushroom Project Jordan Plant Red List Research Library Library Donors Publications BOT ERA Project Community Development Investing in People Artisanal Workshop First Field Trip Sewing Trainees Graduate CIDA Funds the IGP Visiting an Art College Beekeeping Dairy Production Sustainable Living What is Sustainable Living Natural Materials Eco Building Ecodomes at the RBG Solar Cooking Composting Bioindicators Your Carbon Footprint Carbon Footprint Calculator SIDIG MED Project Events RBG Events Support us How You Can Help Donate You are here Home Biodiversity Research Rangeland Rehabilitation Grazing Behaviour CBRR Biomass Surveys Forage Programmes Flock Management Health Economic Studies Local Knowledge Publications Grazing Behaviour Study A study on sheep foraging behaviour was conducted under the RBG s Community Based Rangeland Rehabilitation CBRR programme in 2009 and 2010 to gather information that will help develop grazing management procedures Specific grazing procedures are necessary so that forage resources at the Royal Botanic Garden site and other locations in Jordan can be sustainably utilized Without a specific plan unmanaged grazing can result in excessive grazing at inappropriate times which in turn can lead to a decline in forage production and potential harm to established shrubs The grazing behaviour study was conducted at the RBG site during the four seasons winter January spring April summer June and fall September A small flock of approximately 25 Awassi sheep between 3 and 5 years old grazed in a small enclosed paddock measuring roughly 0 1 ha or 1 dunum They were allowed in for 2 5 hours in the morning for three days The activities of the sheep were classified into six major categories a grazing grasses b browsing shrubs c chewing d rumination e standing and f resting The

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/page/grazing-behaviour (2016-02-14)
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  • Forage Programmes | Royal Botanic Garden
    Your Carbon Footprint Carbon Footprint Calculator SIDIG MED Project Events RBG Events Support us How You Can Help Donate You are here Home Biodiversity Research Rangeland Rehabilitation Forage Programmes CBRR Biomass Surveys Grazing Behaviour Flock Management Health Economic Studies Local Knowledge Publications Forage replacement and research on native forage production are an important part of the RBG s Community Based Rangeland Rehabilitation CBRR programme Forage Replacement Before the establishment of the Royal Botanic Garden in Tell Ar Rumman local herders used to bring their sheep and goats to graze at the site The land was practically grazed bare like so many other unregulated rural areas in Jordan There were major soil degradation and habitat destruction problems caused by overgrazing The herders were initially against the RBG as forage was of course a main concern for them When they found they could no longer have access to the RBG grounds they felt that their livelihood was being threatened At first they used to jump the fence But now they are our protectors and stewards After a number of public info meetings we found a way to work together The RBG explained the need to re establish the vegetation Then we talked about the forage and grazing experiments we were planning that would ultimately be beneficial for them But the key factor that got the herders attention and brought their long term support was our offer of forage replacement to compensate for the loss of grazing land The local herders now regularly receive allotments of fodder for their herds from the RBG along with many other kinds of practical assistance We are happy to report that the fodder replacement programme has allowed the RBG land to recover spectacularly The increase in biomass is above 30 overall and much higher in some locations

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/page/forage-programmes (2016-02-14)
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  • Flock Management and Health | Royal Botanic Garden
    Rangeland Rehabilitation CBRR Our goals were to Improve flock productivity and health Improve herd quality Avoid losses and maximize profits from herds Provide herders with high quality medication for diseased animals in a quick and low cost way Increase the awareness of herders about animal health and avoid medicine misuse Train one young person from the local community to provide simple veterinary services for herders Introduce and apply simple new techniques for herd management Parturition We introduced the practice of isolating rams from the flock in order to synchronize parturition and achieve a high animal pregnancy rate Not only did pregnancies increase considerably but herd management became far simpler The herders found it was easier and less costly to manage newborns all at the same time Plus their profits increased due to more efficient marketing of lambs and milk Flock Health Starting in 2009 we introduced programmes for animal vaccination an animal pharmacy training for a para veterinarian selected by the herders community training and outreach forage disbursement and new management techniques All these programmes assist the herders to raise their income by decreasing losses in their herds increasing production and protecting the health of animals and newborns Herd Vaccination The CBRR set up a vaccination programme in cooperation with the herders to provide animals with protection against targeted infectious diseases Our management plan allows the herders to vaccinate their animals easily together on one date and in a safe way Using this programme eliminates any misuse and mishandling of vaccines Some vaccines and medicines are provided free of charge by the Ministry of Agriculture and some are purchased by the RBG Animal Pharmacy The CBRR established a veterinary pharmacy in a bag to supply the herders with animal medications at cost We decided to do this to address a

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/page/flock-management-and-health (2016-02-14)
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  • Economic Studies on Herding | Royal Botanic Garden
    2nd Forest Awareness Workshop The National Herbarium What is a Herbarium Our Herbarium Collection Type Specimens Acquisition Policies How to Collect Plants Medicinal Plants Mushrooms Jordan Mushroom Project Jordan Plant Red List Research Library Library Donors Publications BOT ERA Project Community Development Investing in People Artisanal Workshop First Field Trip Sewing Trainees Graduate CIDA Funds the IGP Visiting an Art College Beekeeping Dairy Production Sustainable Living What is Sustainable Living Natural Materials Eco Building Ecodomes at the RBG Solar Cooking Composting Bioindicators Your Carbon Footprint Carbon Footprint Calculator SIDIG MED Project Events RBG Events Support us How You Can Help Donate You are here Home Biodiversity Research Rangeland Rehabilitation Economic Studies on Herding CBRR Biomass Surveys Grazing Behaviour Forage Programmes Flock Management Health Local Knowledge Publications The RBG is conducing analyses of the financial performance of participants in our Community Based Rangeland Rehabilitation programme By doing this we are getting a clearer understanding of the factors involved The CBRR team is now helping 42 herding families focus their management efforts on the areas most likely to improve flock profitability Sales expenses and revenue for the sheep and goat producers are examined to determine the profitability of each herd Analyses include productivity per head and total financial performance These studies enable local herders to create an information management system that leads to better and more profitable decision making Livestock Recording System From our initial economic study results the RBG found it very important to disseminate data templates as an extension tool to help livestock owners record their costs in their livestock businesses These templates help herd owners determine if their business is efficient and profitable as it encourages them to record all expenses and costs related to livestock production such as water transportation medicine family labor feeds etc Two papers concerning

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/page/economic-studies-herding (2016-02-14)
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  • Local Knowledge | Royal Botanic Garden
    Policies How to Collect Plants Medicinal Plants Mushrooms Jordan Mushroom Project Jordan Plant Red List Research Library Library Donors Publications BOT ERA Project Community Development Investing in People Artisanal Workshop First Field Trip Sewing Trainees Graduate CIDA Funds the IGP Visiting an Art College Beekeeping Dairy Production Sustainable Living What is Sustainable Living Natural Materials Eco Building Ecodomes at the RBG Solar Cooking Composting Bioindicators Your Carbon Footprint Carbon Footprint Calculator SIDIG MED Project Events RBG Events Support us How You Can Help Donate You are here Home Biodiversity Research Rangeland Rehabilitation Local Knowledge CBRR Biomass Surveys Grazing Behaviour Forage Programmes Flock Management Health Economic Studies Publications A wealth of knowledge is tucked away in the memories of local community members in Jordan Some is traditional knowledge passed down through the generations Some has to do with more recent grazing and farming practices But if not recorded there is a chance it will slip away and we will lose the value of that knowledge forever After speaking with Bedouin elders in Jordan s Badia area the RBG decided to systematically study and document the information they usually pass on through oral tradition regarding livestock production medicinal plant use and grazing management Research on traditional and local knowledge thus became a part of the work of the RBG s Community Based Rangeland Rehabilitation CBRR programme Our first local knowledge study began in January 2010 with the design of a questionnaire to collect local data past and present on the following subjects Livestock numbers Medicinal plants Traditional grazing regimes Endangered plants Animal diseases After 10 focus groups and over 80 meetings with community members the CBRR s first local knowledge study was completed and the results have been published online at Pastoralism Journal See also Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants commonly used

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/page/local-knowledge (2016-02-14)
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  • Community-Based Rangeland Rehabilitation Info | Royal Botanic Garden
    Workshop The National Herbarium What is a Herbarium Our Herbarium Collection Type Specimens Acquisition Policies How to Collect Plants Medicinal Plants Mushrooms Jordan Mushroom Project Jordan Plant Red List Research Library Library Donors Publications BOT ERA Project Community Development Investing in People Artisanal Workshop First Field Trip Sewing Trainees Graduate CIDA Funds the IGP Visiting an Art College Beekeeping Dairy Production Sustainable Living What is Sustainable Living Natural Materials Eco Building Ecodomes at the RBG Solar Cooking Composting Bioindicators Your Carbon Footprint Carbon Footprint Calculator SIDIG MED Project Events RBG Events Support us How You Can Help Donate You are here Home Biodiversity Research Rangeland Rehabilitation Community Based Rangeland Rehabilitation Info CBRR Biomass Surveys Grazing Behaviour Forage Programmes Flock Management Health Economic Studies Local Knowledge Publications The RBG s Community Based Rangeland Rehabilitation programme received visitors from the IUCN the Arab Women s Organization of Jordan جمعية النساء العربيات في الأردن the Bani Hashem cluster villages ad Dhlial village al Hashemiah village and the Range Department of the Ministry of Agriculture on May 1 2012 CBRR Coordinator Khalid Al Khalidi and consultant Dr Mustafa Shudiefat presented the rangeland and herding studies done at the RBG conducted a Q A session and gave a tour of the Garden The participants were interested in hearing about the CBRR s experience with rangeland management biomass growth stocking rates para vets improved herd health and socioeconomic factors and benefited from direct contact with three CBRR herders who were present Jameel Faiz and Ismael Comments ranged from Great to We re inspired to do something similar to We ve visited many projects and didn t see what we ve seen here We found no benefit for us except here For more information and videos about the Community Based Rangeland Rehabilitation programme click here Explaining the

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/page/community-based-rangeland-rehabilitation-info (2016-02-14)
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  • Awareness Workshop - Forest Sector | Royal Botanic Garden
    Our Herbarium Collection Type Specimens Acquisition Policies How to Collect Plants Medicinal Plants Mushrooms Jordan Mushroom Project Jordan Plant Red List Research Library Library Donors Publications BOT ERA Project Community Development Investing in People Artisanal Workshop First Field Trip Sewing Trainees Graduate CIDA Funds the IGP Visiting an Art College Beekeeping Dairy Production Sustainable Living What is Sustainable Living Natural Materials Eco Building Ecodomes at the RBG Solar Cooking Composting Bioindicators Your Carbon Footprint Carbon Footprint Calculator SIDIG MED Project Events RBG Events Support us How You Can Help Donate You are here Home Biodiversity Research Rangeland Rehabilitation Awareness Workshop Forest Sector On 29 30 September 2014 the Royal Botanic Garden held a training workshop in Ajloun Forest Reserve to raise awareness on the importance of maintaining the forest sector The workshop included the launch of a study entitled Problems and Challenges Facing the Forest Sector in Dibeen and Ajloun Representatives from government agencies community organizations and local citizens attended workshop sessions on environmental governance mechanisms to achieve sustainable development and the participatory approach This workshop was part of integrated training under an 18 month Environmental Governance Development project funded by the European Union through the UNDP and Global Environment

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/page/awareness-workshop-forest-sector (2016-02-14)
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  • 2nd Forest Awareness Workshop | Royal Botanic Garden
    What is a Herbarium Our Herbarium Collection Type Specimens Acquisition Policies How to Collect Plants Medicinal Plants Mushrooms Jordan Mushroom Project Jordan Plant Red List Research Library Library Donors Publications BOT ERA Project Community Development Investing in People Artisanal Workshop First Field Trip Sewing Trainees Graduate CIDA Funds the IGP Visiting an Art College Beekeeping Dairy Production Sustainable Living What is Sustainable Living Natural Materials Eco Building Ecodomes at the RBG Solar Cooking Composting Bioindicators Your Carbon Footprint Carbon Footprint Calculator SIDIG MED Project Events RBG Events Support us How You Can Help Donate You are here Home Biodiversity Research Rangeland Rehabilitation 2nd Forest Awareness Workshop On 5 6 November 2014 the Royal Botanic Garden held a second training workshop in Ajloun Forest Reserve attended by representatives from government agencies community organizations and local citizens This workshop aimed to raise awareness on laws governing the forest sector and to highlight the technical difficulties encountered by workers in this sector the importance of forest conservation ecosystem services and eco tourism This workshop was part of integrated training under an 18 month Environmental Governance Development project funded by the European Union through the UNDP and Global Environment Facility running until June 2015

    Original URL path: http://royalbotanicgarden.org/page/2nd-forest-awareness-workshop (2016-02-14)
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