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  • The psychology of primate cooperation and competition: a call for realigning research agendas | Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
    in through your institution You may be able to gain access using your login credentials for your institution Contact your library if you do not have a username and password Pay Per Article You may access this article or this issue from the computer you are currently using for 30 days Regain Access You can regain access to a recent Pay per Article or Pay per Issue purchase if your access period has not yet expired Previous Next Back to top Previous Next January 2016 Volume 371 Issue 1686 Table of Contents Theme issue Understanding self and other from origins to disorders compiled and edited by Caroline Catmur Emily Cross and Harriet Over Search for this keyword Keywords social cognition collaboration mindreading social preferences primates Share The psychology of primate cooperation and competition a call for realigning research agendas Martin Schmelz Josep Call Phil Trans R Soc B 2016 371 20150067 DOI 10 1098 rstb 2015 0067 Published 7 December 2015 Permalink Copy Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word on Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following The psychology of primate cooperation and competition a call for realigning research agendas Message Subject Your Name has sent you a message from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences web site

    Original URL path: http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/371/1686/20150067 (2016-02-09)
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  • Psychological autonomy and hierarchical relatedness as organizers of developmental pathways | Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
    institution Contact your library if you do not have a username and password Pay Per Article You may access this article or this issue from the computer you are currently using for 30 days Regain Access You can regain access to a recent Pay per Article or Pay per Issue purchase if your access period has not yet expired Previous Next Back to top Previous Next January 2016 Volume 371 Issue 1686 Table of Contents Theme issue Understanding self and other from origins to disorders compiled and edited by Caroline Catmur Emily Cross and Harriet Over Search for this keyword Keywords developmental pathways infancy psychological autonomy hierarchical relatedness Share Psychological autonomy and hierarchical relatedness as organizers of developmental pathways Heidi Keller Phil Trans R Soc B 2016 371 20150070 DOI 10 1098 rstb 2015 0070 Published 7 December 2015 Permalink Copy Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word on Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Psychological autonomy and hierarchical relatedness as organizers of developmental pathways Message Subject Your Name has sent you a message from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences web site Your Personal Message Print Manage alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Sign In to Email Alerts with your Email Address

    Original URL path: http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/371/1686/20150070 (2016-02-09)
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  • Homo imitans? Seven reasons why imitation couldn't possibly be associative | Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
    the computer you are currently using for 30 days Regain Access You can regain access to a recent Pay per Article or Pay per Issue purchase if your access period has not yet expired Previous Next Back to top Previous Next January 2016 Volume 371 Issue 1686 Table of Contents Theme issue Understanding self and other from origins to disorders compiled and edited by Caroline Catmur Emily Cross and Harriet Over Search for this keyword Keywords active intermodal matching associative learning associative sequence learning correspondence problem imitation Share Homo imitans Seven reasons why imitation couldn t possibly be associative Cecilia Heyes Phil Trans R Soc B 2016 371 20150069 DOI 10 1098 rstb 2015 0069 Published 7 December 2015 Permalink Copy Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word on Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Homo imitans Seven reasons why imitation couldn t possibly be associative Message Subject Your Name has sent you a message from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences web site Your Personal Message Print Manage alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Sign In to Email Alerts with your Email Address Email Citation tools Review article Homo imitans Seven reasons why imitation couldn t possibly be associative Cecilia Heyes Phil

    Original URL path: http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/371/1686/20150069 (2016-02-09)
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  • The origins of belonging: social motivation in infants and young children | Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
    PDF of this article appears below Previous Next Back to top Previous Next January 2016 Volume 371 Issue 1686 Table of Contents Theme issue Understanding self and other from origins to disorders compiled and edited by Caroline Catmur Emily Cross and Harriet Over Search for this keyword Keywords child development social motivation need to belong affiliation ostracism group membership Share The origins of belonging social motivation in infants and young children Harriet Over Phil Trans R Soc B 2016 371 20150072 DOI 10 1098 rstb 2015 0072 Published 7 December 2015 Permalink Copy Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word on Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following The origins of belonging social motivation in infants and young children Message Subject Your Name has sent you a message from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences web site Your Personal Message Print Manage alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Sign In to Email Alerts with your Email Address Email Citation tools Review article The origins of belonging social motivation in infants and young children Harriet Over Phil Trans R Soc B 2016 371 20150072 DOI 10 1098 rstb 2015 0072 Published 7 December 2015 Citation Manager Formats BibTeX Bookends EasyBib EndNote tagged EndNote 8 xml

    Original URL path: http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/371/1686/20150072 (2016-02-09)
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  • Group bias in cooperative norm enforcement | Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
    site Article Info Metrics eLetters PDF You do not have access to the full text of this article the first page of the PDF of this article appears below Previous Next Back to top Previous Next January 2016 Volume 371 Issue 1686 Table of Contents Theme issue Understanding self and other from origins to disorders compiled and edited by Caroline Catmur Emily Cross and Harriet Over Search for this keyword Keywords norm enforcement group bias cooperation fairness punishment Share Group bias in cooperative norm enforcement Katherine McAuliffe Yarrow Dunham Phil Trans R Soc B 2016 371 20150073 DOI 10 1098 rstb 2015 0073 Published 7 December 2015 Permalink Copy Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word on Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Group bias in cooperative norm enforcement Message Subject Your Name has sent you a message from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences web site Your Personal Message Print Manage alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Sign In to Email Alerts with your Email Address Email Citation tools Review article Group bias in cooperative norm enforcement Katherine McAuliffe Yarrow Dunham Phil Trans R Soc B 2016 371 20150073 DOI 10 1098 rstb 2015 0073 Published 7 December 2015 Citation Manager Formats

    Original URL path: http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/371/1686/20150073 (2016-02-09)
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  • The role of self–other distinction in understanding others' mental and emotional states: neurocognitive mechanisms in children and adults | Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
    not have a username and password Pay Per Article You may access this article or this issue from the computer you are currently using for 30 days Regain Access You can regain access to a recent Pay per Article or Pay per Issue purchase if your access period has not yet expired Previous Next Back to top Previous Next January 2016 Volume 371 Issue 1686 Table of Contents Theme issue Understanding self and other from origins to disorders compiled and edited by Caroline Catmur Emily Cross and Harriet Over Search for this keyword Keywords self other distinction cognitive affective egocentricity temporo parietal junction supramarginal gyrus Share The role of self other distinction in understanding others mental and emotional states neurocognitive mechanisms in children and adults Nikolaus Steinbeis Phil Trans R Soc B 2016 371 20150074 DOI 10 1098 rstb 2015 0074 Published 7 December 2015 Permalink Copy Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word on Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following The role of self other distinction in understanding others mental and emotional states neurocognitive mechanisms in children and adults Message Subject Your Name has sent you a message from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences web site Your Personal Message Print Manage alerts Please log in to

    Original URL path: http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/371/1686/20150074 (2016-02-09)
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  • Mechanisms and development of self–other distinction in dyads and groups | Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
    B Biological Sciences username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your user name or password Log in through your institution You may be able to gain access using your login credentials for your institution Contact your library if you do not have a username and password Pay Per Article You may access this article or this issue from the computer you are currently using for 30 days Regain Access You can regain access to a recent Pay per Article or Pay per Issue purchase if your access period has not yet expired Previous Next Back to top Previous Next January 2016 Volume 371 Issue 1686 Table of Contents Theme issue Understanding self and other from origins to disorders compiled and edited by Caroline Catmur Emily Cross and Harriet Over Search for this keyword Keywords self other distinction empathy joint action social cognition Share Mechanisms and development of self other distinction in dyads and groups Sophie J Milward Natalie Sebanz Phil Trans R Soc B 2016 371 20150076 DOI 10 1098 rstb 2015 0076 Published 7 December 2015 Permalink Copy Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word on Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Mechanisms and development of self other distinction in dyads and groups Message Subject Your Name has sent you a message from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences Message Body Your Name thought

    Original URL path: http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/371/1686/20150076 (2016-02-09)
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  • Empathy as a driver of prosocial behaviour: highly conserved neurobehavioural mechanisms across species | Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
    password Username Enter your Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your user name or password Log in through your institution You may be able to gain access using your login credentials for your institution Contact your library if you do not have a username and password Pay Per Article You may access this article or this issue from the computer you are currently using for 30 days Regain Access You can regain access to a recent Pay per Article or Pay per Issue purchase if your access period has not yet expired Previous Next Back to top Previous Next January 2016 Volume 371 Issue 1686 Table of Contents Theme issue Understanding self and other from origins to disorders compiled and edited by Caroline Catmur Emily Cross and Harriet Over Search for this keyword Keywords empathy evolution biological mechanisms caring development prosocial behaviour Share Empathy as a driver of prosocial behaviour highly conserved neurobehavioural mechanisms across species Jean Decety Inbal Ben Ami Bartal Florina Uzefovsky Ariel Knafo Noam Phil Trans R Soc B 2016 371 20150077 DOI 10 1098 rstb 2015 0077 Published 7 December 2015 Permalink Copy Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word on Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Empathy as a driver of prosocial behaviour highly conserved neurobehavioural mechanisms across species Message Subject Your Name

    Original URL path: http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/371/1686/20150077 (2016-02-09)
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