archive-org.com » ORG » S » SALLAN.ORG

Total: 392

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Getting Active On Passive House | Nancy Anderson, Ph.D. | Torchlight Column | the Sallan Foundation
    Falk said this residential tower will use just 25 of the energy of comparable new buildings but unlike Passive House projects in northern European cities air conditioning will be installed to cope with New York s notorious hot and muggy summer weather Unlike Benedict s mid size multi family buildings the large Cornell tower will have central ventilation and heat recovery systems Determining how to get Passive House performing ventilation systems to comply with New York City building code has been one of the learning curves in this project The good news is that it can be done and this will make doing the next passive high rise and the one after that easier This is certainly an encouraging take away My other chief NYPH conference take away however was that today s market demand for a Passive House is not robust here At the Developer Roundtable Views From the Leading Edge of Market Rate and Affordable Housing moderated by Stuart Brodsky participants spoke frankly and in depth about their experiences in New York City Philadelphia and London The Philadelphia based Passive House architect and developer left me with the impression that the City of Brotherly Love was way out ahead of the Big Apple when it came to scaling up the number of new affordable housing projects that meet Passive House standards Such leadership rests on the state s housing finance agency scoring system which gives extra points to Passive House designed project applications but does not require projects to be Passive House compliant The speaker Timothy McDonald stressed that this was a Passive House victory but one not achieved through policy making by mandate A London based developer of renovated market rate housing whose energy efficiency is way above the norm focused on his firm s market research Here s where things got interesting The research found that home buyers were willing to pay more for good soundproofing but not more for energy efficiency Since the building envelope insulation that soundproofs a structure also makes it much more energy efficient his marketing message emphasized the former along with the healthfulness and thermal comfort of these properties A Brooklyn developer describing new market rate condos designed to be an energy intelligent building ruefully conceded that Passive House standards were not what closed the sale Instead for developers like him however personally committed to cutting his carbon footprint a more direct incentive to build green is found in recent zoning changes which grant developers more floor area to build when they use more building envelope insulation than required by code On the other hand as was noted appraisers are god Since Passive House up front costs don t compute for them appraisals act as an obstacle to energy active projects NYPH 2015 was the fourth annual conference I ve attended Each year more people come each year the speakers have more projects to describe and more facts on the ground to report These appear to be upbeat trends to a

    Original URL path: http://www.sallan.org/Torchlight/2015/06/getting_active_on_passive_house.php (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Spanish Requirement | Nancy Anderson, Ph.D. | Torchlight Column | the Sallan Foundation
    system used by the EPA Portfolio Manager software required by the City s Energy Benchmarking Law began to worry me This leads back to my question what if More Than You Wanted To Know is right It might be right when it comes to the innumerable on line or hard copy disclosures that have become part of the wallpaper of our lives But it s wrong when it comes to the New York City Benchmarking Law Here s why and I thank the authors for this crucial insight about who makes use of fine print specialists can and do make use of disclosure information in their fields of expertise for the conduct of their business or professional lives and they make good advisors to the rest of us The authors demur only on whether access to such useful information must be achieved by mandate The people most likely to pour over the data disclosed by the Benchmarking Law and inform themselves about Portfolio Manager metrics like the EUI are those who have business financial or professional stakes in the level of energy performance in New York City real estate They are building owners or operators occupants investors project architects and engineers along with policy makers who have skin in the game The Co Chair of the Committee on the Environment at the American Institute of Architects New York spells out support for the Benchmarking law in terms of its impact on multiple parties We view Benchmarking as an important first step in a process that leads to more energy efficient buildings In addition to providing owners with the information they need to improve efficiency more data will help to inform future metrics for performance More data will help utilities to design useful energy efficiency programs Emphasis added Furthermore with the publication of Benchmarking Annual Reports BAR s three to date there is a well written publicly accessible lens that brings into sharp focus the characteristics trends and significance of the data that s been disclosed With these reports and an audience of interested stakeholders the noise inherent in reams of reported data has a high probability of being heard as meaningful even actionable information Are there any caveats Yes today general public awareness of the existence let alone the significance of a benchmarking EUI for their home or office building is probably very very low There has been no concerted wide ranging public outreach or education campaign on energy benchmarking This also holds true for building managers or property owners who do not have a staff of trained building system operators to make energy performance changes For them filing their annual building energy and water use benchmarking data could be treated as just another box to tick off on the long list of paperwork required by a government bureaucracy Again the lack of public education and awareness is a problem but a fixable one especially as commercial and residential trade or professional associations step up to educate their constituents More

    Original URL path: http://www.sallan.org/Torchlight/2015/03/the_spanish_requirement.php (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • How Sallan Fits In | Nancy Anderson, Ph.D. | Torchlight Column | the Sallan Foundation
    potential for a sustainable and equitable metropolis Sallan s web site will incubate and broadcast emerging ideas and practices for creating high performance cities Good ideas are necessary for making cities into models for how to use the natural and human resources available to us in ways that are sustainable replicable and equitable Good ideas provide the energy for creating urban alliances some of them surprising Good ideas must be popular too because ideas are not good enough if they are never tested in practice The web site will focus in on Sallan s high performance building and renewable energy agenda Torchlight aims to provoke discussion by looking into what is new contested and feasible in order to formulate knowledge that is there to be used Snapshots a companion website column will offer brief focused think pieces by guest writers who share in the sense of urgency about our interesting times Readers comments will be posted of course Sallan will have carried out its mission if it becomes a purveyor of ideas that matter because they can be put into practice and over time become the new normal Creating the impetus to advance toward this new normal means that individual investment and development decisions must be analyzed both in the context of new technologies and larger development strategies as well as for their pertinent political and economic contexts It is clear that the resources to foster the new normal are missing from current planning efforts in areas like the Hudson Yards the Atlantic Terminal and Williamsburg Absent high performance building standards for such projects or incentives to encourage green design there is no common baseline for making such architectural and engineering commitments commitments that may be shunned as more costly or complex than doing things by the old rulebooks What

    Original URL path: http://www.sallan.org/Torchlight/2005/08/how_sallan_fits_in.php (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Promising Promises | Nancy Anderson, Ph.D. | Torchlight Column | the Sallan Foundation
    to light heat cool and sustain our computer driven lives don t make sense and we will not enhance our economy our environment and our quality of life by pointing to a mere handful of innovations Sallan s biannual energy innovation conferences have been dedicated to advancing useful knowledge about feasible and effective solutions for this century In 2015 we have not fulfilled the dreams of a zero carbon powered world but the promises of renewable energy and the fifth fuel energy efficiency are closer to becoming part of systemic realities Some of us are encouraged others alarmed by this evolutionary rather than revolutionary pace I hope that Sallan s website is fulfilling its promise to incubate and broadcast emerging ideas and practices for creating high performance cities as we continue to grapple with how to make good ideas popular and put them into practice A decade ago I was certain that What the City s rezoning and redevelopment plans need are templates for high performance buildings that would produce structures which use less heat and power while adding to their value Who could have dreamed that PlaNYC 2030 would promise to put New York on a path of cutting its carbon footprint with the current promise being an 80 reduction by 2050 or that the building and energy codes along with zoning rules would have been amended in the service of meeting such a goal I d like to think that the Friends of Benchmarking and the White Papers commissioned by Sallan made a contribution toward understanding the energy performance of our large buildings and engaging owners operators occupants and investors in the value of making them more efficient Have energy efficiency and high performance become the new normal Not yet but we ve come a long way Is

    Original URL path: http://www.sallan.org/Torchlight/2015/01/promising_promises.php (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Difficulty Of Simplicity | Nancy Anderson, Ph.D. | Torchlight Column | the Sallan Foundation
    However when it comes to getting people to reconsider how they d like to live scientific facts are not enough Consider the award winning magazine Modern Farmer In a recent New Yorker profile editor Ann Marie Gardner rejected the slogan Where Agriculture Meets Pop Culture for the first issue Agriculture she said is just a word that people don t like You just shut down when you hear it it s like hearing healthy or nutritious The one we use now is Farm Food Life There s a message here for urban climate and renewable energy wordsmiths analysts and activists It s a hopeful message They can find better ways to talk write blog and tweet about all the stuff that makes up the great mundane of our daily habits and expectations as well as those pivot moments when we make big choices about where to live in a city near mass transit out of a listed flood zone how to live putting energy efficiency on the top ten list of things that matter when signing an office lease or finding a place to live or what to expect when plunking down hard earned cash for workplace or home improvements Energy Star appliances Oh yes and civic engagement both in the form of supporting candidates for public office who advance a climate forward agenda as well as engaging in district or neighborhood level advocacy Words and phrases like sustainability resiliency or benchmarking building energy efficiency don t mean much to people who aren t already immersed in climate and energy work Most folks won t try to do something just because they hear it s more sustainable more resilient and the rest Why Maybe it s inertia cost unfamiliarity inconvenience or any of a host of usual suspects Too often the terms advocates rely on as messaging workhorses are just background noise for the rest of us even worse the words can resonate as some kind of jargon that takes too much time to translate into a phrase that s either reassuringly familiar or new in an appealing way If climate and sustainable city activists want to change the public s personal collective and political actions as well as shift the boundaries of acceptable and unacceptable behavior they must make their recommendations more specific results oriented and compelling If climate friendly choices are also sweet cool dope rad fun low cost risk free and no down payment even better But the first task is to be clear and ask people to consider doing things they know how to do That would be a great start OK a great restart since the call for better climate messaging is nothing new This sounds easy enough to do but it s not In fact it s very hard When writing that sustainability advocates resiliency policy makers and benchmarking practitioners should use more four letter words it was just a jocular way of pointing out a deep communications problem This problem leaves us stuck

    Original URL path: http://www.sallan.org/Torchlight/2014/11/the_difficulty_of_simplicity.php (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Resiliency. Sustainability. Equity. | Llewellyn Wells | Snapshot Column | the Sallan Foundation
    some very important lessons in Gowanus lessons about scale you need more than a few blocks about becoming too dependent on key building owners in designing programming bad idea and on the need for developing key early years programming that the community can become involved with and come together around start small and build capacity over time We are bringing those lessons to bear as we begin the process of engaging the Eco Districts Protocol in East Harlem and the Lower East Side The Protocol is already being deployed in Boston Washington DC Portland Seattle San Francisco Denver Atlanta Charleston SC New York Eco Districts won t be the guinea pigs for well meaning but untried ideas The Protocol begins with concurrent community asset evaluation and stakeholder engagement processes These methods have been in in use for decades as tools of the trade deployed by city planners affordable housing developers commercial developers and community organizations The Protocol makes no attempt to reinvent the wheel Rather it puts proven working wheels on a new vehicle for delivery of better because they are more integrated results In East Harlem the LOTT Community Development Corporation has emerged as the key leading community partner LOTT owns 27 affordable housing properties in this neighborhood and has been an integral part of the community for 26 years Working in partnership with the NYCEDWG LOTT will help bring other existing community organizations together into a visioning process around what East Harlem sees in it s own resilient sustainable and equitable future The programming that evolves out of this process will be community focused community led and must always benefit the community itself There is no prescriptive solution that NYCEDWG imposes or requires Every community is unique and must be in the lead of developing and implementing its own vision Still let s remember that no community is an island unto itself Regulatory regimes economic and marketplace issues zoning and other planning processes all of these powerful forces need to be examined through a larger contextual lens But by working at the district scale participants can bring added focus to understanding what regulations and policies might be changed in order to bring more resiliency sustainability and equity to the district and by extension to the entire city At the district scale ideas can be test driven without risking the political or market disruption that could occur if new regulations or policies are rolled out city or statewide first Think Demonstration Project of which there have been countless examples undertaken in New York City over the past decades but Eco Districts have the potential to be Demonstration Projects with a difference This isn t easy It takes perseverance guts political will and money Where will the money come from There are multiple potential sources For example if analysis shows a community microgrid could be built to serve buildings with appropriate waste energy profiles that are close to other buildings with the necessary load profile needs then there are NYSERDA

    Original URL path: http://www.sallan.org/Snapshot/2014/11/resiliency_sustainability_equity.php (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Eco Districts: Making NYC More Sustainable & Resilient, One Neighborhood at a Time | Llewellyn Wells | Snapshot Column | the Sallan Foundation
    difference two years can make Now post Superstorm Sandy the need for more resilient distributed generation assets strategically sited around the City is at the forefront of serious discussion Today Green Infrastructure programs are beginning to be viewed as key long term tactical interventions in efforts to mitigate excessive stormwater runoff while also providing natural buffers during future storm surge events Think of a super sponge soaking up stormwater naturally on site before it even reaches the sewer system Long important to Living City Block these goals are becoming closely aligned with current government commercial and other civil society goals How Eco Districts Drive Resiliency and Equity A recognized need for resiliency has changed the playing field of urban redevelopment for good By employing an Eco District type construct to organize communities around long term sustainability and resiliency goals workable district energy projects can be developed that will provide crisis response energy services at the district scale While surrounding neighborhoods remained in the dark for eight days New York University was able to keep its Washington Square campus lit up after Sandy hit What if there were many NYU type combined heat and power or microgrid districts set up around the City What if an Eco District structure of some kind were able to provide energy services when the grid goes down next time Image Eco District Chart As we now know all it takes for the grid to go down again is an unforeseen event such as another storm a terrorist attack a malicious hacker or even a tree falling on a transmission line in Ohio think summer 2003 blackout As new co generation and microgrid technologies gain market share due to increased demand and a rethinking of current regulatory environment see Governor Cuomo s just released Reforming the Energy Vision 1 today s prohibitive costs will be pushed downwards tomorrow Finally increased onsite energy storage methods and other technology innovations will further help both cost and practically considerations in the very near term But resiliency isn t only about crisis management True resiliency begins when a community is connected working together to build a better future for itself and provide models and inspiration for other communities Through an Eco Districts type framework the many stakeholders within a neighborhood are brought together to vision design implement and manage a more resilient and sustainable future Working together has additional positive implications that become clear as actual Eco District type programs and projects to build the future emerge over time The neighborhood builds its own local jobs economic development and connectivity programs that develop concurrently with the sustainability and resilience efforts If those programs are already in place the Eco District type process enhances them as a more cohesive group of stakeholders evolves As an added bonus when a crisis hits the neighborhood is better positioned to come together and share need resources and services With many New Yorkers focusing on the need for more equitable and affordable living standards across

    Original URL path: http://www.sallan.org/Snapshot/2014/04/eco_districts_making_nyc_more_sustainability_resilient_one_neighborhood_at_a_time.php (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • We're Beginning To See The Light | Nick Lombardi | Snapshot Column | the Sallan Foundation
    might be different across different buildings Disclosure policies have done a lot to help us understand the characteristics piece and now we re seeing new research start to fill in the gaps around these other elements As a result of the questions raised by his benchmarking work Dr Kontokosta has undertaken a study to explore the relationship between tenant characteristics and energy use with CBRE one of the world s leading property management firms with operations across the globe and with the premier national environmental advocacy organization Natural Resources Defense Council He is also now analyzing the data from the third year of LL84 and adding a new extremely important dimension to our understanding of building energy use time We ve matched up about 6 000 buildings that we have three years of data for and it s beginning to tell some interesting stories The challenge is that there are a lot of variables that affect energy consumption and many of these variables are changing over time as is the amount of energy a building is consuming So to begin to assess whether a building is becoming more efficient can be challenging unless you re normalizing for occupant density and operating hours for example and other changes to the building over those years and that s something that because of data limitations hasn t been done much in the past We re just now getting to the point where we have this data over a long enough period of time to really make use of it and understand it The implications of Dr Kontokosta s work and of all of the studies now emerging from it are broad and important and it will take more research to really understand how all of these variables work together This pace is entirely proper for innovative policies and industry practices Premature judgments of the effectiveness of LL84 risk wasting the progress made by Dr Kontokosta and his colleagues and squandering the vast potential of what their continued efforts might yield For the real estate community it s still too early to rule on LL84 s success Here it s illustrative to compare those who have been benchmarking for years voluntarily and those to whom this process is entirely new under LL84 For example at Cushman Wakefield another of the world s leading property management firms many building managers have been using EPA s ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager for years tracking ENERGY STAR scores and using benchmarking information to drive energy upgrades For them LL84 compliance is no more effort and requires no new learning beyond what they had prior But for some of the buildings new to C W many property managers were learning Portfolio Manager for the first time requiring training and support from C W s more experienced staff to deliver the expected level of service According to Eric Duchon C W s Manager of Sustainability Strategies who heads up LL84 compliance The knowledge about benchmarking definitely improved across the board

    Original URL path: http://www.sallan.org/Snapshot/2014/01/were_beginning_to_see_the_light.php (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive



  •