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  • Save Hamilton Open Space - Hamilton, New Jersey
    Square Road The latest site plan is now available to be viewed on the links below or above Further details of the engineer s renderings and site plan can be reviewed at the land use office in the Hamilton Municipal Building Please note latest modification at last hearing some additional land is proposed to be left as a setback of 211 feet on the Broad St side of the property Will it be temporary or a permanent setback A stone s throw from Lengyen farm and the old North Crosswicks cemetery the proposed Diocese of Trenton cemetery would eventually replace all the scenic open farm fields currently planted with soybeans and wrap around part of the most historic and picturesque part of North Crosswicks Residents contend that the use is not compatible with the purpose of the RRC and were out in force at the previous hearings to oppose this application Diocese of Trenton Cemetery application was heard on Tuesday January 26th Zoning Board Hearings are typically held on Tuesdays at 6 30 pm at the Municipal Building 2nd floor at 2090 Greenwood Avenue See Old Site Plan See Revised Site Plan Crosswicks Doctors Creek Watershed Association Inc Launches new initiative The Crosswicks Doctors Creek Watershed Association Inc CDCWA a local non profit public educational and conservation charity was recently awarded a grant of 2 500 from The Watershed Institute in partial funding of a well water test and organizational membership growth initiative The CDCWA also has used a portion of a gift made by SHOS to help promote this initiative Limited to the first 43 participants and running from now through October 31 2013 the well water test and 1 year membership in the CDCWA special offer is just 95 We want to encourage the residents and businesses in the part of Hamilton who get their drinking water from private wells and who are proximate to the Crosswicks and Doctors Creeks to take advantage of this special offer To participate click here to access the Well Water Test and Membership Growth Initiative page Read the content carefully fill in the on line Order Form Part 1 and send it in When you are directed back to the Initiative page to pay for the test follow the Part 2 instructions and at Your Shopping Cart checkout use the coupon code WELLSHED2013 and click Validate in order to get the special pricing For more information email to info ccdcgreenway org or call 609 752 1832 or 609 758 1609 C hristopher Estates at Laura Evelyn Avenue E nforcement Issue brought to Township Council s attention on November 20 2012 Lawsuit filed in June 2013 A Non Compliant Stormwater Management System 10 Years and Counting This past November 20th 2012 Save Hamilon Open Space and their lawyer Stuart Lieberman plus Michele Donato representing Save Barnegat Bay and the Sierra Club went before the Hamilton Township Council to urge that something be done about the still non complaint stormwater management system at Christopher

    Original URL path: http://www.savehamiltonopenspace.org/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Space Basics - Save Hamilton Open Space
    flooding Also since the land was formerly used for skeet shooting residents were concerned about lead significant contamination from pellets and clay targets In addition they were worried that a proposed street connection would create cut through traffic in their neighborhood SHOS joined neighbors in seeking to guarantee environmental protections Despite the public outcry the Zoning Board granted preliminary approval of the project at its January 11 2011 meeting Neighbors appealed the Board s decision to the Hamilton Council They ruled that the township ordinance limited the appeal to the variance that was granted so the other issues were not considered by Council That variance which was not a contentious issue was upheld Council later passed a resolution to support additional testing on the site in accordance with federal best practices for shooting range site cleanup What s Happening Now Despite several OPRA requests to the township residents are still in the dark about specifics of the testing particularly the sampling method used They contend that Council s resolution regarding additional testing and sampling was not followed For example no testing was done for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons or PAHs a known carcinogen PAHs were in the pitch that glued together the clay targets used on the skeet shooting ranges Also there was no groundwater sampling or off site testing Residents dispute the township contention that only 2 to 5 percent of the property is contaminated because that percentage is based on faulty sampling They say that both the samples and the area of investigation were too small and that samples were taken at incorrect soil depths They are very concerned considering that 78 of the samples collected from the site thus far have contained lead and several of those soil samples contained lead contamination over 100 times above NJ DEP limits The Trenton Times reported a statement by Tom Troy VP of Sharbell saying that all sampling is complete Other issues include the location of a stream and adjacent wetlands water table levels and a proposed retention pond NJ Dept of Environmental Protection NJDEP reversed its initial ruling regarding the stream location The first determination would have caused the loss of up to ten houses from the site plan due to their encroachment into wetlands buffer zones NJDEP s initial ruling was based on an on site inspection of the property They changed their mind based on 70 year old photos of the site The second ruling said that the Sharbell delineation was right after all and that all 52 houses could be built That reversal is being appealed to the NJDEP and in court Another issue has to do with a method developers use to delineate no build buffer zones around wetlands and streams Known as stream buffer averaging it s a tradeoff that permits encroachment into one section of a buffer if another section is expanded The problem with using it in this development is that it was used some years ago but never recorded Now the developer

    Original URL path: http://www.savehamiltonopenspace.org/openspacenews.htm (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Space Basics - Save Hamilton Open Space
    and categorizes all open space within the Township Where Is It Part of Hamilton s Open Space and Recreation Plan is a map that identifies the various types of open space in the township Why Save It There should be a balance between developed and undeveloped land Protection of wildlife and habitat Flood prevention Aquifer recharge Lessens pollution air noise light Lessens congestion Provides recreation Aesthetic value of our natural

    Original URL path: http://www.savehamiltonopenspace.org/openspacebasics.htm (2016-04-24)
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  • Development - Save Hamilton Open Space
    of public notices from around the state are uploaded from participating newspapers including the Trenton Times and are posted on the New Jersey Press Association web site Pre plan Developers may meet with local government officials the mayor economic development director planning department etc to discuss a concept or plan Zoning Each development must conform to Hamilton s zoning requirements If not variances or waivers may be sought by developers from the Zoning Board An example of a use variance is when a plot of land is zoned for residential use and the developer wants to build a commercial building on it Zoning Board meetings are public and are held the second Tuesday of each month at the Municipal Building 2090 Greenwood Ave Public notification is required On the other hand a permanent change to a zone requires action by the Municipal Council Planning Board and Mayor Zone definitions All land is zoned for some type of development No land is zoned for preservation or parkland or forest etc Hamilton has about 23 zoning districts They vary from single family residential to highway commercial to manufacturing to conservation which still permits development and more All are listed on Hamilton s web site Hamilton also publishes a zoning map The Plan is Filed The developer creates a formal plan to build housing retail offices etc on a parcel of land and files it with Hamilton s Department of Planning Engineering and Inspections When a plan is filed it becomes public information but there is no requirement to notify the public that it has been filed Planning Dept Review The Department of Planning Engineering and Inspections reviews the plan to ensure that it meets township zoning requirements local ordinances and NJ Municipal Land Use Law requirements This step can be very quickly or can last for several months or longer The developer may meet with the Department to review and revise the plan Once the plan is deemed complete by the Department of Planning Engineering and Inspections it is sent to the Hamilton Environmental Commission for review Environmental Commission Review The Environmental Commission comments on any environmental issues Examples are the presence of wetlands whether the Phase II Stormwater Management rules apply or whether Hamilton s tree replacement ordinance applies etc The commission s comments become part of the application Hamilton s wetlands map is used to determine the possible presence of wetlands The developer may be required to get a Letter of Interpretation LOI from the NJ Dept of Environmental Protection The LOI delineates the exact extent and type of wetlands Residents within 200 feet of the development are notified that an LOI is being sought and may comment to the DEP The extent and type of wetlands directly affect the extent of permitted construction Planning Board Public Notice The application is scheduled to be heard by the Planning Board The Planning Board meeting is a public meeting and a notice must be posted at least ten days prior to hearing

    Original URL path: http://www.savehamiltonopenspace.org/openspacedevelopment.htm (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Space Basics - Save Hamilton Open Space
    near Klockner Ave The purpose of the redevelopment zone is to encourage redevelopment of abandoned and often polluted properties so called brownfields Redevelopment plans within the zone are approved by the Hamilton Council Hamilton s Redevelopment Agency is charged with insuring that building within the zone complies with the Redevelopment Plan s rules Hamilton s first redevelopment plan had three components 1 A transit village that included housing commercial and retail space parking a hotel etc that was supposed to be built by NJTransit in the area around Hamilton s NJTransit station 2 The American Metro office center located where the former American Standard plant was located 3 A 680 unit housing development by Columbia Group adjacent to American Metro All together the plan allowed for 1 000 housing units and 1 million square feet of commercial and retail space All three projects were governed by Hamilton s first redevelopment plan which included a Redevelopment Zone Map Much of the original plan has changed The transit village 1 above plan has been scrapped and the Columbia Group project 3 above has been modified Further the redevelopment zone could be nullified or at least challenged due to a 2009 NJ Supreme Court ruling 3 Hamilton Wetlands The type and location of wetlands are determined by soil hydrology water flow and plants Hamilton in cooperation with the NJ Department of Environmental Protection NJDEP produced a map that shows existing wetlands Generally wetlands cannot be built upon although there are some exceptions The map is a guide to wetlands not a definitive study Based on the wetlands map developers may be required by the Planning Board to determine a more precise delineation of wetlands Typically developers hire a private company to prepare a report which is then given to the NJDEP for verification Ultimately NJDEP issues a Letter of Interpretation LOI that states the exact location and value of wetlands Wetlands value determines the size of a no build buffer around the wetlands Typically it s 50 feet but wetlands of extraordinary value have a 300 foot buffer requirement Streams classified as C 1 also have a 300 foot buffer requirement Hamilton has no C 1 streams Residents within 200 feet of land being inspected for the existence of wetlands are required to be notified of the activity and are invited to give comments to NJDEP Public comment can and has influenced the NJDEP s decisions and thus the amount of construction permitted on a site 4 Hamilton Natural Resources Inventory In 1976 Hamilton commissioned a Natural Resources Inventory NRI An important use of the NRI is to influence land use and development decisions including changes to the Master Plan It contains constraints maps that categorize the entire township from low constraint most suitable for development to no development The level of constraint to be shown when planning a development is based on analysis of soil vegetation geology and water Even though it s nearly 30 years old it s still valid There

    Original URL path: http://www.savehamiltonopenspace.org/hamiltonissues.htm (2016-04-24)
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  • The Future - Save Hamilton Open Space
    uses and requires auto trips The Transit Village concept is an example The true transit village does not include American Metro or the Columbia Group housing project only the project on the east site of the rail line Careful study and evaluation of the impact of the Transit Village have yet to be done Storm Water Management Phase II Storm Water Management Regulations a new state law began taking effect in Feb 2004 Hamilton should require that developers demonstrate compliance with the new rules at the time of preliminary site plan approval rather than making compliance a condition of approval So called conditional approvals exclude the public from the process Redevelopment Plan There should be more public involvement in the Hamilton Redevelopment Plan Hamilton s first redevelopment plan includes the American Metro office complex the Columbia Group housing project and the Transit Village development The 1 000 acre Redevelopment Zone will see more projects in the future Farm Road Hamilton s master plan calls for a new road to link Iron Bridge Rd with Merrick Rd It would cross Sawmill Road and run through or adjacent to two former farms that have been approved for housing developments Shisler farm and Dey farm A new road will draw more development make subdivision of existing properties possible by creating more frontage and thereby increase development and subsequently traffic and taxes All this in an area of farms that Hamilton wants to preserve The road should not be built Natural Resources Inventory Hamilton needs to update its Natural Resources inventory NRI and incorporate its findings more actively in development decisions The current NRI was written nearly 30 years ago It is meant to guide Master Plan and development decisions The NRI analyzes soil geology vegetation and hydrology and categorizes all lands by constraint level Low ok to build Moderate shouldn t build High don t build if at all possible No Build do not build Assunpink Creek A report Closing the Missing Link on the Assunpink Creek Greenway recommends creation of a greenway along the creek Hamilton should become active in this effort and support the creation of the greenway to protect stream quality preserve habitat control flooding and provide recreational opportunities Further the C 1 classification of Assunpink Creek should be extended to the entire length of the creek beyond the the current C 1 portions that flow through the Mercer County Wildlife Management Area and the Van Nest Preserve This is the highest state stream classification and would help to preserve the integrity of the stream Crosswicks Creek Hamilton should incorporate recommendations of the Crosswicks Creek Doctors Creek Watershed Greenway Plan into land use plans and decisions Hamilton participated in the creation of this study and is planning a trail along the creek Impact Fees and Moratoriums When development costs taxpayers money the developer should share that expense If the town s infrastructure roads sewers schools etc cannot support proposed new development and developers won t pay to create or upgrade

    Original URL path: http://www.savehamiltonopenspace.org/thefuture.htm (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Space Projects - Save Hamilton Open Space
    interaction with the environment It is the safest and most cost effective option for pest management Residents too should be encouraged to use IPM techniques like natural landscaping and safely disposing of leftover pesticides to achieve sustainable lawn care Encourage rehabilitation and reuse of contaminated sites As of August 2010 there were 99 known contaminated sites in Hamilton Remediation funding is available from the Hazardous Discharge Site Remediation Fund and the NJ Environmental Infrastructure Trust HamiltonÂÂ s Township Economic Development Advisory Commission and the Redevelopment Agency can be involved in securing this funding The Environmental Commission or other groups or individuals should monitor the status of operating permits for facilities with air permits Two major facilities Congoleum Corporation and the PSE G Fossil LLC Mercer Generating Station are regulated by the federal Clean Air Act Over 150 other facilities in Hamilton have permits Read the entire Environmental Resource Inventory The Master Plan may seem distant and removed from everyday life but it is the foundation for what happens in communities throughout Hamilton A good example is ÂÂ Rural Resource Conservation Zone ThreatenedÂÂ found in ÂÂ Latest NewsÂÂ and the ÂÂ Open Space ProjectsÂÂ story above A developer wants to change the Master Plan to rezone a portion of HamiltonÂÂ s Rural Resource Conservation zone to accommodate a development that is currently prohibited SHOS urges residents to get involved in the Master Plan process by reviewing the Master Plan website participating in meetings and contacting Clark Caton Hinz or HamiltonÂÂ s Planning Department with suggestions The master plan website contains contact information and more SHARBELL HOUSING PROJECT AT ITALIAN AMERICAN SPORTSMANÂÂ S CLUB Feb 18 2011 Sharbell Land Development filed a plan to build 52 houses on 37 5 acres of land Sharbell acquired from the Italian American SportsmanÂÂ s Club on Kuser Rd across from Veterans Park The applicant sought flood plain relief a zoning variance and preliminary and final approval of a major subdivision Local residents were concerned that some of the proposed houses were encroaching into wetlands and would cause neighborhood flooding Since the land was formerly used for skeet shooting residents were also concerned about lead contamination from pellets Neighbors were also worried that a proposed street connection would create ÂÂ cut throughÂÂ traffic in their neighborhood SHOS joined neighbors in seeking to guarantee environmental protections Nevertheless the Zoning Board granted preliminary approval of the project at its January 11 2011 meeting Neighbors are appealing the decision to the Hamilton Council Read Trenton Times story about Development Approved Read Trenton Times story about Resident Appeals CARE ONE Feb 18 2011 At itÂÂ s June 9 2009 meeting HamiltonÂÂ s Zoning Board denied a proposed expansion of the Care One assisted living facility located on Whitehorse Hamilton Square Rd near Cypress Lane The vote was 5 2 to not grant at least eight variances to township zoning regulations Denial of the variances effectively denied the development plan The proposed addition to the existing Care One facility was 62 000 square feet 50 more than allowed by code It would have more than doubled the size of the existing 58 000 square foot facility SHOS supported residents of Society Hill II the condominium complex located behind the proposed development who argued that Care One should follow existing zoning rules Approximately 70 people attended the final meeting in a battle that stretched over two years and numerous Zoning Board meetings Society Hill II residents organized as REEL DC Residents for the Enforcement of Existing Land Development Codes to oppose the variances sought by Care One Among their concerns were an inadequate storm water management plan decrease in property value increase in traffic a reduction in the buffer between homes and Care One from 150 feet required by code to 15 feet in places elimination of scores of trees in the buffer and on the site and construction of a new roadway behind the proposed facility Also if the plan had been approved residents who currently view trees from their homes would have seen a 400 foot long building instead Experts in planning environmental and legal issues testified in support of Society Hill II residents at the Zoning Board meetings Status Care One has not filed plans for another development on the site but continues to work with NJDEP to create a compliant storm water management plan Residents Website Trenton Times stories about Care One LAURA AVE Jan 16 2011 Residents in the Cornwell Heights neighborhood opposed the Gres Kaluzny LLC application to build 16 houses and a retention basin on 7 7 acres of a former farm at the corner of Laura and Evelyn Avenues saying the development was was too dense and out of character with the neighborhood Major concerns were potential flooding and increased traffic in the quiet neighborhood along with similar impacts from the nearby train station development The property is adjacent to Assunpink Creek and was recommended as a site for a park in Closing the Missing Link on the Assunpink Creek Greenway a report by the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission Hamilton s Planning Board approved the application on March 10 2005 with the condition that NJ DEP and or the Mercer County Soil Conservation District approve the storm water management plan SHOS appealed the approval contending the Planning Board was responsible for approving the storm water management plan that NJDEP and MCSC had no authority to approve it and therefore would not act to determine compliance and even if they did the public would not be able to participate in their decision and further that the plan submitted was not compliant with new state mandated rules Three other environmental groups the Sierra Club NJ Audubon Society and Save Barnegat Bay joined SHOS as amici curiae in the appeal In July 2006 the NJ Appeals Court remanded to case back to the Hamilton Planning Board saying that the other governmental agencies may not act or the public may not have an opportunity to be heard

    Original URL path: http://www.savehamiltonopenspace.org/openspaceprojects.htm (2016-04-24)
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  • Resources - Save Hamilton Open Space
    governor Letters to the Editor The Times of Trenton Via email letters njTimes com Via US Mail Letters to the Editor The Times P O Box 847 Trenton NJ 08650 Via Fax 609 394 2819 Hamilton Public Meetings Municipal council 1st 3rd Tuesday each month 8pm Municipal Building 2090 Greenwood Ave Planning Board 2nd 4th Thursday each month 7pm Building 2090 Greenwood Ave Zoning Board 2nd Tuesday each month 7pm Municipal Building 2090 Greenwood Ave Environmental Commission 2nd Wednesday each month Tampa Ave Maps and Studies Reconnaissance Level Historic Sites Survey Historic Crosswick Creek Doctors Creek Watershed Greenway Plan Greenway Plan C A Railroad Map Map Fast Track Map Map 2010 Hamilton Open Space and Recreation Plan Map Plan Map 2009 Open Space and Recreation Plan Plan 2003 Hamilton Open Space and Recreation Plan Map Plan Map 2003 Hamilton Open Space and Recreation Plan Plan Hamilton Wetlands Map Hamilton Wetlands Map Redevelopment Map Map Redevelopment Plan Plan Top 25 Tracts Targeted for Preservation Top 25 Zoning Map Zoning Map Economic Benefits of Open Space Investments Study Shows Economic Value of Open Space Bond Measure Would Far Exceed Costs NJ Keep It Green The Benefits of State Preservation Programs Summary and Full Paper NJ Keep It Green The Economic Benefits of Land Conservation Trust for Public Land and link to bibliography Valuing New Jersey s Natural Capital An Assessment of the Economic Value of the State s Natural Resources NJDEP Open Space is a Good Investment The Financial Argument for Open Space Preservation ANJEC Community Benefits of Open Space Trust for Public Land Economic Benefits of Conserved Rivers An Annotated Bibliography National Park Service Links Preservation New Jersey 10 Most Endangered Historic Sites in NJ http www preservationnj org site ExpEng index php 10most index detail Robbinsville Keep It Green Campaign

    Original URL path: http://www.savehamiltonopenspace.org/openspaceresources.htm (2016-04-24)
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