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  • On the Loss of a Matriarch - Save the Elephants
    a genetic mutation Poachers are in search of elephants with the biggest and best tusks for which they will get a better price through illegal trade mostly in China It is often the older elephants both male and female that possess these tusks and all too often lose their lives because of an antiquated belief around the prestige of owning ivory When one of these magnificent matriarchs is killed not only does the family group lose a leader they lose something far more valuable and the world loses another intelligent creature not only ecologically essential but also equipped with emotions and senses just like human beings Dr Charles Foley of the Tarangire Elephant Project sought to find out what is truly lost when a female matriarch is found dead at the hands of humans Foley s research indicates that when a matriarch dies the family loses something incredibly important knowledge Elephants in the absence of immense human encroachment can live into their seventies sometimes even older These older individuals have likely lived through numerous experiences floods droughts and the like They have lived They can utilize the information from their experiences to ensure the success of their family members Elephants are extremely intelligent animals and are known to be capable of making spatio temporal maps They can remember where certain food and water resources are at certain times of the year These matriarchs can then lead their families in dire times to these places because they have the knowledge and memories to do so When they are gone who can lead them It is typical for the next oldest female to take over and lead the group but if the matriarch who has passed had 20 more years of knowledge or the new matriarch has not experienced an extreme drought

    Original URL path: http://savetheelephants.org/blog/?detail=on-the-loss-of-a-matriarch (2016-02-10)
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  • An Elephant Never Forgets - Save the Elephants
    skilled elephant scientist these traits are immediately apparent Some characteristics that are commonly used to identify elephants are presence or absence of tusks as well as color and morphology of the tusks Arapaho a very distinguished lady of the American Indian family has only a right tusk that is long and slender and juts out to the side rather than straight forward Other markings that are commonly used to tell individuals apart are ear traits The frayed edges holes slits notches and cuts each provide a clue to the observer and mark the elephant s story like words on the pages of a memoir of the long journeys they have traversed across the rugged Acacia speckled landscape In addition when a family unit is observed a count is taken and location is noted GPS location is of great importance so that we can see where the elephants are traveling during certain times of the day and certain parts of the year Some of these elephants are resident populations while others migrate in and out of the reserves Their movement habits are also recorded feeding resting as well as their reaction to the vehicle For most of these elephants they have become habituated to the STE cars over the years and often many of them are especially curious about this large sand colored specimen rolling by to observe them In addition the reserve does see its fair share of tourists so the cars are nothing new for these elephants However for elephants that do travel out of the reserves they sometimes find themselves in places that are not safe We recently encountered a female and her very young calf likely born this year accompanied by a young bull It was explained that the young mother and bull were both probably orphans

    Original URL path: http://savetheelephants.org/blog/?detail=an-elephant-never-forgets (2016-02-10)
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  • Superb experience at STE! - Save the Elephants
    human beings How could this even be possible After several times of going to the field for LTM Long Term Monitoring I could now confidently understand how Just as we human beings are identified by our distinct fingerprints elephants too can easily be distinguished from one another using their ear patterns and their tusks All have unique ear patterns that easily distinguish them from one another I got to know that elephants around Samburu National Reserve and its surroundings are classified into three groups by the STE research team These are the Sporadics the Migrants and the Residents Sporadics are those elephants that can go for a long period of time say even for three years then show up again in the reserve Migrants are those that keep moving in and out of the reserve but usually for a short time while residents are those that are always found in the reserve I got a chance to participate in the collaring of Nutmeg a female in the Spice Girls family and a bull named Boru It was such a wonderful experience infact one that I had never thought possible I enjoy every moment I wake up and find myself in this prodigious research camp knowing the activities of the day that await me I must say they are interesting exertion that keep me going and help in expounding my knowledge on wildlife especially elephants and other mammals found in the reserve and its environs through the activity of mammal census that is occasionally carried out I also enjoy helping Jenna an international intern with elephant poop collection though at first times I found it tiresome sitting in the car waiting for an elephant to defecate for her study During this time I usually get a nice view of the elephants

    Original URL path: http://savetheelephants.org/blog/?detail=superb-experience-at-ste (2016-02-10)
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  • Rewarding Bravery - Save the Elephants
    him to his most trusted teacher who reported the matter to Osotua Wildlife Foundation who then got in touch with Save the Elephants A team that included the Kenya Wildlife Service officials immediately visited the site and recovered the tusks which would have otherwise ended up in the wrong hands At the time Christopher was a Standard six pupil at Lorubae Primary School located just meters away from the Samburu National Game Reserve Save the Elephants through Jerenimo Lepirei our Research and Community Outreach Officer reached out and encouraged him to continue being vigilant and to be our eyes on the ground that his actions could mean saving the life of the elephants that his community has lived with for ages This it seems was all the reassurance he needed Later that year he found pieces of ivory in the grazing fields brought them to school and looked proudly as they were forwarded to the Kenya Wildlife Service It was after his most recent act reporting a drowned baby elephant that had been washed away by the floods that Save the Elephants Osotua Wildlife Foundation and Samburu National Reserve decided to celebrate and reward this young man Now in Standard Eight he had more than proved himself to be a brave role model and a budding conservationist who wanted nothing but the best for elephants and his community After a short speech urging teachers and students alike to take on conservation as a personal responsibility he held his hard earned trophy high above his tall frame as the rest of the school cheered him on It had to be one of the proudest moments in his life We can only hope that the public recognition trophy brand new school uniform and a revision encyclopedia will offer some inspiration and spur

    Original URL path: http://savetheelephants.org/blog/?detail=rewarding-bravery (2016-02-10)
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  • China’s Ivory Market Slowing, Perhaps Decreasing - Save the Elephants
    2004 with 9 ivory factories almost every year since then the government has increased the number to a maximum of 37 in 2014 The same is true for retail shops from 31 in 2004 to 145 in 2014 One explanation for the large increases in the number of officially registered ivory factories and retail outlets was that from 2002 the Chinese government strongly promoted the cultural heritage of the Chinese ivory carving industry Earlier in 2015 the Chinese government began to restrict the number of mainland visitors from the huge city of Shenzhen to neighbouring Hong Kong Although the reasons are not yet clear the regulation may reduce significantly the number of Chinese shoppers to Hong Kong This could adversely affect the retail ivory industry of Hong Kong because the majority of the retail buyers of Hong Kong ivory items the city with the largest number of ivory items on display for sale in the world are mainland Chinese These buyers smuggle ivory objects out of Hong Kong and bring them into mainland China illegally Prices may already be responding In 2010 the average price for a similar tusk was USD 750 kg By early 2014 that figure had tripled and the average black market wholesale price a factory or carver in Beijing paid for 1 5 kg tusk of good quality was USD 2100 kg But for the first quarter of 2015 the average black market retail price for a polished not raw tusk was USD 2650 kg wholesale prices were not available from my source but using my earlier data as a guide to the difference in price between the two forms of ivory would have been around USD 2000 2200 kg The USD 2650 price is based on polished tusks actually sold on social media and on

    Original URL path: http://savetheelephants.org/blog/?detail=china-s-ivory-market-slowing-perhaps-decreasing (2016-02-10)
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  • Blog - Save the Elephants
    the idea of conservation and we can now see more and more of them attending wildlife seminars and courses to open more place to wild animals This is so especially with people living north of Matthews Ranges who still have a lot of land to share Read More March 28 2003 Field visits to Shimba Hills 16th March 18th March 2003 Save the Elephants The dung samples are to be analysed to determine the stress levels and the relationships between various elephant populations We went to Shimba Hills Game Reserve first where we found fresh elephant tracks but unfortunately no elephants were sighted nor any fresh elephant dung was found We managed to collect one sample which was about a day old We decided to head to Mwaluganje Elephant Game Sanctuary as we had been informed that there were many elephants along the river On the Read More February 27 2003 Kamunyak the miracle lioness by David Daballen Senior Research Assistant Samburu National Reserve has recently become a famous park across Africa and the whole world today At the beginning of last year the eighth wonder of world happened here in Kenya In Samburu a Lioness now known as Kamunyak adopted a baby Oryx This made many people question whether this has ever been seen anywhere before the scientist and religion people all sat down but no answer was obtained The religion said It s the end of the age but before the end of the age came Read More January 30 2003 Snared Calf by David Daballen Senior Research Assistant Elephants are always prone to many risks especially when they go outside the protected area and are likely to get snared or poached both of which always cause much stress or even result in death sometimes On 20 Jan 03 as I was looking for a specific bull B1033 Apollo for re collaring I found calf R33 95m who is about seven years with a huge plastic on his rear foot struggling to walk We sent a radio message to Lewa Wildlife Conservancy to try and get hold of Ian Craig who has Read More December 20 2002 The Story of Tomboi the orphaned baby elephant in Samburu by Carter D Ong Donor Relations Officer On Friday December 13th 2002 I traveled to Samburu with Laurence for an end of the year bash for Save the Elephants and Elephant Watch Safaris Often very interesting things happen there but Saturday December 14th was without a doubt one of the most memorable days I have ever had In the morning we heard Iain on the radio saying that they had found an abandoned elephant calf and that they were desperately searching for its mother George was certain who the calf was and had just Read More August 19 2002 In memory of Hakim by Ann Kathrin Oerke STE guest researcher On the 16th of August 2002 we lost one of our most beautiful and gentle elephant bulls HAKIM a 30 35

    Original URL path: http://savetheelephants.org/blog/29/ (2016-02-10)
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  • Blog - Save the Elephants
    and Trustees Our Partners Funding Press and Media External Reports Contact Us DONATE Select Page Home Blog Among the Elephants Blog First Previous Page 31 of 30 About Elephants What We Do Our Projects Get Involved About STE Donate Facebook Twitter Google Instagram YouTube SIGN UP FOR OUR eNEWSLETTER THE MONTHLY TRUMPET Get important updates on elephant conservation and be a part of our community helping to conserve the largest

    Original URL path: http://savetheelephants.org/blog/31/ (2016-02-10)
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  • Index of /wp-content/uploads/2013/09
    6 5K circle 1 2 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 5 2K circle 1 2 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 6 5K circle 1 3 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 5 2K circle 1 3 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 6 5K circle 2 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 3 5K circle 2 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 4 0K circle 2 0 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 3 5K circle 2 0 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 4 0K circle 2 1 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 3 5K circle 2 1 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 4 0K circle 2 2 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 3 5K circle 2 2 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 4 0K circle 3 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 6 8K circle 3 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 8 3K circle 3 0 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 6 8K circle 3 0 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 8 3K circle 3 1 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 6 8K circle 3 1 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 8 3K circle 3 2 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 6 8K circle 3 2 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 8 3K circle 4 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 5 8K circle 4 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 7 1K circle 4 0 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 5 8K circle 4 0 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 7 1K circle 4 1 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 5 8K circle 4 1 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 7 1K circle 4 2 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 5 8K circle 4 2 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 7 1K gallery1 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 6 3K gallery1 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 13K gallery1 0 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 6 3K gallery1 0 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 13K gallery1 1 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 6 3K gallery1 1 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 13K gallery2 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 6 8K gallery2 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 14K gallery3 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 7 2K gallery3 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 18K gallery4 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 5 0K gallery4 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 9 9K gallery5 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 5 2K gallery5 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 12K image1 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 5 9K image1 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 11K image2 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 3 5K image2 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 5 7K image3 150x150 jpg 14 Apr 2014 03 52 4 6K image3 jpg 14 Apr

    Original URL path: http://savetheelephants.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/ (2016-02-10)
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