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  • Adoptive cellular therapy: A race to the finish line | Science Translational Medicine
    98109 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Ton N Schumacher Division of Immunology Netherlands Cancer Institute Plesmanlaan 121 1066 CX Amsterdam Netherlands Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Join Subscribe Purchase Article Activate Member Account Renew Subscription Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract Adoptive T cell transfer for cancer chronic infection and autoimmunity is an emerging field that shows promise in recent trials Using the principles of synthetic biology advances in cell culture and genetic engineering have made it possible to generate human T cells that display desired specificities and enhanced functionalities compared with the natural immune system The prospects for widespread availability of engineered T cells have changed dramatically given the recent entry of the pharmaceutical industry to this arena Here we discuss some of the challenges such as regulatory cost and manufacturing and opportunities including personalized gene modified T cells that face the field of adoptive cellular therapy Copyright 2015 American Association for the Advancement of Science View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 7 Issue 280 25 March 2015 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Adoptive cellular therapy A race to the finish line Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Download Powerpoint Print Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit Alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Log in Request Permissions Citation tools Adoptive cellular therapy A race to the finish line By Carl H June Stanley R Riddell Ton N Schumacher Science Translational Medicine 25 Mar 2015 280ps7 Engineered T cells are under development in academic industry partnerships accelerating the pace toward widespread availability Citation Manager Formats BibTeX Bookends EasyBib EndNote tagged EndNote 8 xml Medlars Mendeley Papers RefWorks Tagged Ref Manager RIS Zotero Share Adoptive cellular therapy A race to the finish line By Carl H June Stanley R Riddell Ton N Schumacher Science Translational Medicine 25

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/280/280ps7 (2016-02-10)
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  • Personalized genomic analyses for cancer mutation discovery and interpretation | Science Translational Medicine
    Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Samuel V Angiuoli Personal Genome Diagnostics Baltimore MD 21224 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Luis A Diaz Jr The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Victor E Velculescu The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Join Subscribe Purchase Article Activate Member Account Renew Subscription Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract Massively parallel sequencing approaches are beginning to be used clinically to characterize individual patient tumors and to select therapies based on the identified mutations A major question in these analyses is the extent to which these methods identify clinically actionable alterations and whether the examination of the tumor tissue alone is sufficient or whether matched normal DNA should also be analyzed to accurately identify tumor specific somatic alterations To address these issues we comprehensively evaluated 815 tumor normal paired samples from patients of 15 tumor types We identified genomic alterations using next generation sequencing of whole exomes or 111 targeted genes that were validated with sensitivities 95 and 99 respectively and specificities 99 99 These analyses revealed an average of 140 and 4 3 somatic mutations per exome and targeted analysis respectively More than 75 of cases had somatic alterations in genes associated with known therapies or current clinical trials Analyses of matched normal DNA identified germline alterations in cancer predisposing genes in 3 of patients with apparently sporadic cancers In contrast a tumor only sequencing approach could not definitively identify germline changes in cancer predisposing genes and led to additional false positive findings comprising 31 and 65 of alterations identified in targeted and exome analyses respectively including in potentially actionable genes These data suggest that matched tumor normal sequencing analyses are essential for precise identification and interpretation of somatic and germline alterations and have important implications for the diagnostic and therapeutic management of cancer patients Copyright 2015 American Association for the Advancement of Science View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 7 Issue 283 15 April 2015 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/283/283ra53 (2016-02-10)
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  • Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering nanostars for high-precision cancer imaging | Science Translational Medicine
    this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Michael Saborowski Cancer Biology and Genetics Program Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York NY 10065 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Eric C Holland Human Biology Division and Solid Tumor Translational Research Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Alvord Brain Tumor Center University of Washington Seattle WA 98109 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Samuel Singer Department of Surgery Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York NY 10065 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Kenneth P Olive Department of Medicine Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center Columbia University Medical Center New York NY 10032 USA Department of Pathology and Cell Biology Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center Columbia University Medical Center New York NY 10032 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Scott W Lowe Cancer Biology and Genetics Program Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York NY 10065 USA Howard Hughes Medical Institute New York NY 10065 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Ronald G Blasberg Department of Radiology Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York NY 10065 USA Brain Tumor Center Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York NY 10065 USA Center for Molecular Imaging and Nanotechnology CMINT Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York NY 10065 USA Department of Neurology Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York NY 10065 USA Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York NY 10065 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Moritz F Kircher Department of Radiology Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York NY 10065 USA Brain Tumor Center Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York NY 10065 USA Center for Molecular Imaging and Nanotechnology CMINT Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York NY 10065 USA Department of Radiology Weill Cornell Medical College New York NY 10065 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract The inability to visualize the true extent of cancers represents a significant challenge in many areas of oncology The margins of most cancer types are not well demarcated because the cancer diffusely infiltrates the surrounding tissues Furthermore cancers

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/271/271ra7 (2016-02-10)
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  • Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using nanoparticle-carrying T cells | Science Translational Medicine
    02139 USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA Ragon Institute of MGH MIT and Harvard Cambridge MA 02139 USA Howard Hughes Medical Institute Chevy Chase MD 20815 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Join Subscribe Purchase Article Activate Member Account Renew Subscription Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract Tumor cells disseminate into compartments that are poorly accessible from circulation which necessitates high doses of systemic chemotherapy However the effectiveness of many drugs such as the potent topoisomerase I poison SN 38 is hampered by poor pharmacokinetics To deliver SN 38 to lymphoma tumors in vivo we took advantage of the fact that healthy lymphocytes can be programmed to phenocopy the biodistribution of the tumor cells In a murine model of disseminated lymphoma we expanded autologous polyclonal T cells ex vivo under conditions that retained homing receptors mirroring lymphoma cells and functionalized these T cells to carry SN 38 loaded nanocapsules on their surfaces Nanocapsule functionalized T cells were resistant to SN 38 but mediated efficient killing of lymphoma cells in vitro Upon adoptive transfer into tumor bearing mice these T cells served as active vectors to deliver the chemotherapeutic into tumor bearing lymphoid organs Cell mediated delivery concentrated SN 38 in lymph nodes at levels 90 fold greater than free drug systemically administered at 10 fold higher doses The live T cell delivery approach reduced tumor burden significantly after 2 weeks of treatment and enhanced survival under conditions where free SN 38 and SN 38 loaded nanocapsules alone were ineffective These results suggest that tissue homing lymphocytes can serve as specific targeting agents to deliver nanoparticles into sites difficult to access from the circulation and thus improve the therapeutic index of chemotherapeutic drugs with unfavorable pharmacokinetics Copyright 2015 American Association for the Advancement of Science View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 7 Issue 291 10 June 2015 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using nanoparticle carrying T cells Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Download

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/291/291ra94 (2016-02-10)
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  • three patients who remained on treatment beyond the first scanning interval harbored these EGFR ECD mutations The remaining patient had indolent disease having been diagnosed with metastatic disease 7 years earlier and achieving stable disease on five of six previous therapies One additional patient of the 11 achieved stable disease and received MM 151 in combination with irinotecan Subject ID Study treatment EGFR ECD mutations Best RECIST v 1 1

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/highwire/markup/199589/expansion?width=1000&height=500&iframe=true&postprocessors=highwire_figures%2Chighwire_math%2Chighwire_embed (2016-02-10)
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  • A notch against cancer | Science Translational Medicine
    Search for this author on this site Article Info Metrics eLetters Article Information vol 8 no 324 324ec17 DOI http dx doi org 10 1126 scitranslmed aaf2004 Published By American Association for the Advancement of Science Print ISSN 1946 6234 Online ISSN 1946 6242 History Copyright Usage Copyright 2016 American Association for the Advancement of Science Author Information Ellen J Beswick Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center Albuquerque NM 87131 USA E mail ebeswick at salud unm edu AltMetrics No Altmetric data available for this article Article usage Full PDF Feb 2016 486 174 View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 8 Issue 324 03 February 2016 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following A notch against cancer Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit Alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Log in Request Permissions Citation tools A notch against cancer By Ellen J Beswick Science Translational Medicine 03 Feb 2016 324ec17 Notch signaling may

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/8/324/324ec17.article-info (2016-02-10)
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  • A notch against cancer | Science Translational Medicine
    automatically Upload Tables and Figures Attach tables e g doc and figures jpg gif tif by choosing the desired file and then uploading them below Add a new file Upload Files must be less than 100 MB Allowed file types doc jpg jpeg gif tif pdf File names can only contain the following characters A Z a z 0 9 Author Information Contributors First name and middle name First or given name e g Peter Last Name Your last or family name e g MacMoody Email Your email address e g higgs boson gmail com Role Occupation Your role and or occupation e g Orthopedic Surgeon Affiliation Your organization or institution if applicable e g Royal Free Hospital Add another contributor optional Statement of Competing Interests Competing interests Yes No Please describe the competing interests Highwire Comment Subject Apath Vertical Tabs Submit No eLetters have been published for this article View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 8 Issue 324 03 February 2016 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following A notch against cancer Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/8/324/324ec17.e-letters (2016-02-10)
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  • A notch against cancer DP 2016 Mar 03 TA Science Translational Medicine PG 324ec17 324ec17 VI 8 IP 324 4099 http stm sciencemag org content 8 324 324ec17 short 4100

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/highwire/citation/199623/medlars (2016-02-10)
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