archive-org.com » ORG » S » SCIENCEMAG.ORG

Total: 698

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".

  • Hiroyuki AU Takada Minoru AU Lifshits Eugene AU Okuno Kiyotaka AU Engelman Jeffrey A AU Shivdasani Ramesh A AU Nishio Kazuto AU Fukuoka Masahiro AU Varella Garcia Marileila AU Nakagawa Kazuhiko AU Jänne Pasi A TI Activation of ERBB2 Signaling Causes Resistance to the EGFR Directed Therapeutic Antibody Cetuximab DP 2011 Oct 07 TA Science Translational Medicine PG 99ra86 99ra86 VI 3 IP 99 4099 http stm sciencemag org content 3 99 99ra86 short 4100 http stm sciencemag org content 3 99 99ra86 full AB Cetuximab an antibody directed against the epidermal growth factor receptor is an effective clinical therapy for patients with colorectal head and neck and non small cell lung cancer particularly for those with KRAS and BRAF wild type cancers Treatment in all patients is limited eventually by the development of acquired resistance but little is known about the underlying mechanism Here we show that activation of ERBB2 signaling in cell lines either through ERBB2 amplification or through heregulin up regulation leads to persistent extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 2 signaling and consequently to cetuximab resistance Inhibition of ERBB2 or disruption of ERBB2 ERBB3 heterodimerization restores cetuximab sensitivity in vitro and in vivo A subset of colorectal

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/highwire/citation/186116/medlars (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Hiroyuki A1 Takada Minoru A1 Lifshits Eugene A1 Okuno Kiyotaka A1 Engelman Jeffrey A A1 Shivdasani Ramesh A A1 Nishio Kazuto A1 Fukuoka Masahiro A1 Varella Garcia Marileila A1 Nakagawa Kazuhiko A1 Jänne Pasi A T1 Activation of ERBB2 Signaling Causes Resistance to the EGFR Directed Therapeutic Antibody Cetuximab JF Science Translational Medicine YR 2011 FD American Association for the Advancement of Science VO 3 IS 99 SP 99ra86 OP 99ra86 DO 10 1126 scitranslmed 3002442 UL http stm sciencemag org content 3 99 99ra86 abstract AB Cetuximab an antibody directed against the epidermal growth factor receptor is an effective clinical therapy for patients with colorectal head and neck and non small cell lung cancer particularly for those with KRAS and BRAF wild type cancers Treatment in all patients is limited eventually by the development of acquired resistance but little is known about the underlying mechanism Here we show that activation of ERBB2 signaling in cell lines either through ERBB2 amplification or through heregulin up regulation leads to persistent extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 2 signaling and consequently to cetuximab resistance Inhibition of ERBB2 or disruption of ERBB2 ERBB3 heterodimerization restores cetuximab sensitivity in vitro and in vivo A subset

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/highwire/citation/186116/refworks (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Genetic Ablation of Epidermal EGFR Reveals the Dynamic Origin of Adverse Effects of Anti-EGFR Therapy | Science Translational Medicine
    author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Stuart H Yuspa Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics Center for Cancer Research National Cancer Institute National Institutes of Health Bethesda MD 20892 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract Cancer patients treated with anti EGFR epidermal growth factor receptor drugs often develop a dose limiting pruritic rash of unknown etiology The aims of our study were to define causal associations from a clinical study of cutaneous and systemic changes in patients treated with gefitinib and use these to develop and characterize a mouse model that recapitulates the human skin rash syndrome caused by anti EGFR therapy We examined the patients plasma before and after treatment with gefitinib and documented changes in chemokines and leukocyte counts associated with the extent of rash or the presence of pruritus We established a parallel mouse model by ablating EGFR in the epidermis These mice developed skin lesions similar to the human rash Before lesion development we detected increased mRNA expression of chemokines in the skin associated with early infiltration of macrophages and mast cells and later infiltration of eosinophils T cells and neutrophils As the skin phenotype evolved changes in blood counts and circulating chemokines reproduced those seen in the gefitinib treated patients Crossing the mutant mice with mice deficient for tumor necrosis factor α TNF α receptors MyD88 NOS2 CCR2 T cells or B cells failed to reverse the skin phenotype However local depletion of macrophages provided partial resolution suggesting that this model can identify targets that may be effective in preventing the troublesome and dose limiting skin response to anti EGFR drugs These results highlight the importance of EGFR signaling in maintaining skin immune homeostasis and identify a macrophage contribution to a serious adverse consequence of cancer chemotherapy Copyright 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 5 Issue 199 21 August 2013 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Genetic Ablation of Epidermal EGFR Reveals the Dynamic Origin of Adverse Effects of Anti EGFR Therapy Message Subject Your Name

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/5/199/199ra110 (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Improved Rodent Maternal Metabolism But Reduced Intrauterine Growth After Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy | Science Translational Medicine
    the abstract View Full Text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract Obesity has profound negative consequences on female reproduction as well as on the metabolic health of offspring Bariatric surgery is the most effective method for sustained weight loss A critical question is whether bariatric surgery can reverse the deleterious effects of obesity on both female reproduction and subsequent offspring Vertical sleeve gastrectomy VSG is a bariatric procedure rapidly growing in popularity because it provides weight loss and other metabolic benefits that are comparable to those offered by the more complicated Roux en Y gastric bypass RYGB Female rats rendered obese on a high fat diet HFD underwent either VSG or sham surgery Like their male counterparts females had significant metabolic improvements including reduced adiposity and improved glucose tolerance After VSG female rats showed a more normal reproductive cycle Despite these maternal benefits the offspring of dams receiving VSG were born smaller and lighter than offspring of control dams that underwent sham surgery When maintained on an HFD after puberty these adult offspring had a greater propensity to develop glucose intolerance and increased adiposity than the offspring of lean mothers or obese mothers who underwent sham surgery These data suggest that weight loss alone by obese mothers is not sufficient to reverse the deleterious effects of an HFD and obesity on their offspring Copyright 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 5 Issue 199 21 August 2013 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Improved Rodent Maternal Metabolism But Reduced Intrauterine Growth After Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Download Powerpoint Print Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit Alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Log in Request Permissions Citation tools Improved Rodent Maternal Metabolism But Reduced Intrauterine Growth After Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy By Bernadette E Grayson Katarina M Schneider Stephen C Woods Randy J Seeley Science Translational Medicine 21 Aug 2013

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/5/199/199ra112 (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Perspectives from man’s best friend: National Academy of Medicine’s Workshop on Comparative Oncology | Science Translational Medicine
    Search for this author on this site Lee J Helman Center for Cancer Research National Cancer Institute National Institutes of Health Bethesda MD 20892 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Michael B Kastan Duke Cancer Institute Durham NC 27710 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Deborah W Knapp Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences Purdue University West Lafayette IN 47907 2026 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Wendy J Levin Fate Therapeutics Inc San Diego CA 92121 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Cheryl London Department of Veterinary Biosciences College of Veterinary Medicine The Ohio State University Columbus OH 43210 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Nicola Mason Department of Veterinary Biosciences College of Veterinary Medicine The Ohio State University Columbus OH 43210 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Christina Mazcko Center for Cancer Research National Cancer Institute National Institutes of Health Bethesda MD 20892 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Patricia N Olson Olson Consulting Animal Health and Welfare Fort Collins CO 80528 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Rodney Page Flint Animal Cancer Center College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Colorado State University Fort Collins CO 80523 1620 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Beverly A Teicher Molecular Pharmacology Branch Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis National Cancer Institute Bethesda MD 20892 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Douglas H Thamm Flint Animal Cancer Center College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Colorado State University Fort Collins CO 80523 1620 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Jeffrey M Trent Translational Genomics Research Institute TGen Phoenix AZ 85004 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site David M Vail Department of Medical Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of Wisconsin Madison Madison WI 53706 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Chand Khanna Center for Cancer Research National Cancer Institute National Institutes of Health Bethesda MD 20892 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/8/324/324ps5.full.pdf+html? (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Companion animals: Translational scientist’s new best friends | Science Translational Medicine
    on this site Diana L Farmer Department of Surgery School of Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Jan A Nolta Department of Cell Biology and Human Anatomy School of Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Department of Internal Medicine School of Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Robert B Rebhun Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Xinbin Chen Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Department of Internal Medicine School of Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Leigh G Griffiths Department of Medicine and Epidemiology School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Frank J M Verstraete Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Christopher J Murphy Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science School of Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Dori L Borjesson Department of Pathology Microbiology and Immunology School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 7 Issue 308 07 October 2015 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Companion animals Translational scientist s new best friends Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/308/308ps21.figures-only (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Companion animals: Translational scientist’s new best friends | Science Translational Medicine
    Davis CA 95616 USA Department of Internal Medicine School of Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Leigh G Griffiths Department of Medicine and Epidemiology School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Frank J M Verstraete Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Christopher J Murphy Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science School of Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Dori L Borjesson Department of Pathology Microbiology and Immunology School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF Article Information vol 7 no 308 308ps21 DOI http dx doi org 10 1126 scitranslmed aaa9116 PubMed 26446953 Published By American Association for the Advancement of Science Print ISSN 1946 6234 Online ISSN 1946 6242 History Copyright Usage Copyright 2015 American Association for the Advancement of Science Author Information Amir Kol 1 Boaz Arzi 2 Kyriacos A Athanasiou 3 4 Diana L Farmer 5 Jan A Nolta 6 7 Robert B Rebhun 2 Xinbin Chen 2 7 Leigh G Griffiths 8 Frank J M Verstraete 2 Christopher J Murphy 2 9 and Dori L Borjesson 1 1 Department of Pathology Microbiology and Immunology School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA 2 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA 3 Department of Biomedical Engineering University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 U S A 4 Department of Orthopedic Surgery School of Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA 5 Department of Surgery School of Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA 6 Department of Cell Biology and Human Anatomy School of Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA 7 Department of Internal Medicine School of Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA 8 Department of Medicine and Epidemiology School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA 9 Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science School of Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Corresponding author E mail dlborjesson at ucdavis edu Equal contribution AltMetrics No Altmetric data available for this article Article usage Abstract Full PDF Oct 2015 2904 780 658 Nov 2015 196 89

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/308/308ps21.article-info (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Companion animals: Translational scientist’s new best friends | Science Translational Medicine
    Robert B Rebhun Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Xinbin Chen Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Department of Internal Medicine School of Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Leigh G Griffiths Department of Medicine and Epidemiology School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Frank J M Verstraete Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Christopher J Murphy Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science School of Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Dori L Borjesson Department of Pathology Microbiology and Immunology School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF Submit a Response to This Article Compose eLetter Title Contents More information about text formats Plain text Plain text No HTML tags allowed Web page addresses and e mail addresses turn into links automatically Lines and paragraphs break automatically Upload Tables and Figures Attach tables e g doc and figures jpg gif tif by choosing the desired file and then uploading them below Add a new file Upload Files must be less than 100 MB Allowed file types doc jpg jpeg gif tif pdf File names can only contain the following characters A Z a z 0 9 Author Information Contributors First name and middle name First or given name e g Peter Last Name Your last or family name e g MacMoody Email Your email address e g higgs boson gmail com Role Occupation Your role and or occupation e g Orthopedic Surgeon Affiliation Your organization or institution if applicable e g Royal Free Hospital Add another contributor optional Statement of Competing Interests Competing interests Yes No Please describe the competing interests Highwire Comment Subject Apath Vertical Tabs Submit No eLetters have been published for this article View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 7 Issue 308 07 October 2015 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/308/308ps21.e-letters (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive



  •