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  • cancer imaging DP 2015 Feb 21 TA Science Translational Medicine PG 271ra7 271ra7 VI 7 IP 271 4099 http stm sciencemag org content 7 271 271ra7 short 4100 http stm sciencemag org content 7 271 271ra7 full AB The inability to visualize the true extent of cancers represents a significant challenge in many areas of oncology The margins of most cancer types are not well demarcated because the cancer diffusely infiltrates the surrounding tissues Furthermore cancers may be multifocal and characterized by the presence of microscopic satellite lesions Such microscopic foci represent a major reason for persistence of cancer local recurrences and metastatic spread and are usually impossible to visualize with currently available imaging technologies An imaging method to reveal the true extent of tumors is desired clinically and surgically We show the precise visualization of tumor margins microscopic tumor invasion and multifocal locoregional tumor spread using a new generation of surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering SERRS nanoparticles which are termed SERRS nanostars The SERRS nanostars feature a star shaped gold core a Raman reporter resonant in the near infrared spectrum and a primer free silication method In genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic cancer breast cancer prostate cancer and

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/highwire/citation/196050/medlars (2016-02-10)
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  • cancer imaging JF Science Translational Medicine YR 2015 FD American Association for the Advancement of Science VO 7 IS 271 SP 271ra7 OP 271ra7 DO 10 1126 scitranslmed 3010633 UL http stm sciencemag org content 7 271 271ra7 abstract AB The inability to visualize the true extent of cancers represents a significant challenge in many areas of oncology The margins of most cancer types are not well demarcated because the cancer diffusely infiltrates the surrounding tissues Furthermore cancers may be multifocal and characterized by the presence of microscopic satellite lesions Such microscopic foci represent a major reason for persistence of cancer local recurrences and metastatic spread and are usually impossible to visualize with currently available imaging technologies An imaging method to reveal the true extent of tumors is desired clinically and surgically We show the precise visualization of tumor margins microscopic tumor invasion and multifocal locoregional tumor spread using a new generation of surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering SERRS nanoparticles which are termed SERRS nanostars The SERRS nanostars feature a star shaped gold core a Raman reporter resonant in the near infrared spectrum and a primer free silication method In genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic cancer breast cancer prostate

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/highwire/citation/196050/refworks (2016-02-10)
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  • Clinical translation of an ultrasmall inorganic optical-PET imaging nanoparticle probe | Science Translational Medicine
    Gönen Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New York NY 10065 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Hovanes Kalaigian Department of Medical Physics Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New York NY 10065 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Heiko Schöder Department of Radiology Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New York NY 10065 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site H William Strauss Department of Radiology Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New York NY 10065 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Steven M Larson Department of Radiology Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New York NY 10065 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Ulrich Wiesner Department of Materials Science and Engineering Cornell University 330 Bard Hall Ithaca NY 14853 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Michelle S Bradbury Department of Radiology Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New York NY 10065 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the pdf extract View Full Text Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Join Subscribe Purchase Article Activate Member Account Renew Subscription Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians You do not have access to the full text of this article the first page of the PDF of this article appears below Science Translational Medicine Vol 6 Issue 260 29 October 2014 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Clinical translation of an ultrasmall inorganic optical PET imaging nanoparticle probe Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Download Powerpoint Print Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit Alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/6/260/260ra149 (2016-02-10)
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  • The Fate and Toxicity of Raman-Active Silica-Gold Nanoparticles in Mice | Science Translational Medicine
    article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract Raman spectroscopy is an optical imaging method that is based on the Raman effect the inelastic scattering of a photon when energy is absorbed from light by a surface Although Raman spectroscopy is widely used for chemical and molecular analysis its clinical application has been hindered by the inherently weak nature of the Raman effect Raman silica gold nanoparticles R Si Au NPs overcome this limitation by producing larger Raman signals through surface enhanced Raman scattering Because we are developing these particles for use as targeted molecular imaging agents we examined the acute toxicity and biodistribution of core polyethylene glycol PEG ylated R Si Au NPs after different routes of administration in mice After intravenous administration PEG R Si Au NPs were removed from the circulation by macrophages in the liver and spleen that is the reticuloendothelial system At 24 hours PEG R Si Au NPs elicited a mild inflammatory response and an increase in oxidative stress in the liver which subsided by 2 weeks after administration No evidence of significant toxicity was observed by measuring clinical histological biochemical or cardiovascular parameters for 2 weeks Because we are designing targeted PEG R Si Au NPs for example PEG R Si Au NPs labeled with an affibody that binds specifically to the epidermal growth factor receptor to detect colorectal cancer after administration into the bowel lumen we tested the toxicity of the core nanoparticle after administration per rectum We observed no significant bowel or systemic toxicity and no PEG R Si Au NPs were detected systemically Although additional studies are required to investigate the long term effects of PEG R Si Au NPs and their toxicity when carrying the targeting moiety the results presented here support the idea that PEG R Si Au NPs can be safely used in living subjects especially when administered rectally Footnotes Citation A S Thakor R Luong R Paulmurugan F I Lin P Kempen C Zavaleta P Chu T F Massoud R Sinclair S S Gambhir The Fate and Toxicity of Raman Active Silica Gold Nanoparticles in Mice Sci Transl Med 3 79ra33 2011 Copyright 2011 American Association for the Advancement of Science View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 3 Issue 79 20 April 2011 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following The Fate and Toxicity of Raman Active Silica

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/3/79/79ra33 (2016-02-10)
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  • Rapid, Label-Free Detection of Brain Tumors with Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy | Science Translational Medicine
    Boston MA 02115 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Cathie Spino Department of Biostatistics School of Public Health University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Sandro Santagata Department of Pathology Brigham and Women s Hospital Harvard Medical School Boston MA 02115 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Sandra Camelo Piragua Department of Pathology University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Keith L Ligon Department of Pathology Brigham and Women s Hospital Harvard Medical School Boston MA 02115 USA Department of Medical Oncology Center for Molecular Oncologic Pathology Dana Farber Cancer Institute Boston MA 02115 USA Department of Pathology Boston Children s Hospital Harvard Medical School Boston MA 02115 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Oren Sagher Department of Neurosurgery University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site X Sunney Xie Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology Harvard University Cambridge MA 02138 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract Surgery is an essential component in the treatment of brain tumors However delineating tumor from normal brain remains a major challenge We describe the use of stimulated Raman scattering SRS microscopy for differentiating healthy human and mouse brain tissue from tumor infiltrated brain based on histoarchitectural and biochemical differences Unlike traditional histopathology SRS is a label free technique that can be rapidly performed in situ SRS microscopy was able to differentiate tumor from nonneoplastic tissue in an infiltrative human glioblastoma xenograft mouse model based on their different Raman spectra We further demonstrated a correlation between SRS and hematoxylin and eosin microscopy for detection of glioma infiltration κ 0 98 Finally we applied SRS microscopy in vivo in mice during surgery to reveal tumor margins that were undetectable under standard operative conditions By providing rapid intraoperative assessment of brain tissue SRS microscopy may ultimately improve the safety and accuracy of surgeries where tumor boundaries are visually indistinct Copyright 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 5 Issue 201 04 September 2013

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/5/201/201ra119 (2016-02-10)
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  • Endoscopic molecular imaging of human bladder cancer using a CD47 antibody | Science Translational Medicine
    Bio X Program Stanford University Stanford CA 94305 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Lei Kang Department of Urology and Bio X Program Stanford University Stanford CA 94305 USA Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System Palo Alto CA 94304 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Matt van de Rijn Department of Pathology Stanford University Stanford CA 94305 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Eila C Skinner Department of Urology and Bio X Program Stanford University Stanford CA 94305 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Sanjiv S Gambhir Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford and Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering Stanford University Stanford CA 94305 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Irving L Weissman Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine Stanford University Stanford CA 94305 USA Department of Pathology Stanford University Stanford CA 94305 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Joseph C Liao Department of Urology and Bio X Program Stanford University Stanford CA 94305 USA Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System Palo Alto CA 94304 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract A combination of optical imaging technologies with cancer specific molecular imaging agents is a potentially powerful strategy to improve cancer detection and enable image guided surgery Bladder cancer is primarily managed endoscopically by white light cystoscopy with suboptimal diagnostic accuracy Emerging optical imaging technologies hold great potential for improved diagnostic accuracy but lack imaging agents for molecular specificity Using fluorescently labeled CD47 antibody anti CD47 as molecular imaging agent we demonstrated consistent identification of bladder cancer with clinical grade fluorescence imaging systems confocal endomicroscopy and blue light cystoscopy in fresh surgically removed human bladders With blue light cystoscopy the sensitivity and specificity for CD47 targeted imaging were 82 9 and 90 5 respectively We detected variants of bladder cancers which are diagnostic challenges including carcinoma in situ residual carcinoma in tumor resection bed recurrent carcinoma following prior intravesical immunotherapy with Bacillus Calmette Guérin BCG and excluded cancer from benign but suspicious appearing mucosa CD47 targeted molecular imaging could improve diagnosis and resection thoroughness for bladder cancer Copyright 2014

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/6/260/260ra148 (2016-02-10)
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  • Imaging Enterobacteriaceae infection in vivo with 18F-fluorodeoxysorbitol positron emission tomography | Science Translational Medicine
    Research Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Baltimore MD 21287 USA Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Sanjay K Jain Center for Infection and Inflammation Imaging Research Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Baltimore MD 21287 USA Department of Pediatrics Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract The Enterobacteriaceae are a family of rod shaped Gram negative bacteria that normally inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and are the most common cause of Gram negative bacterial infections in humans In addition to causing serious multidrug resistant hospital acquired infections a number of Enterobacteriaceae species are also recognized as biothreat pathogens As a consequence new tools are urgently needed to specifically identify and localize infections due to Enterobacteriaceae and to monitor antimicrobial efficacy In this report we used commercially available 2 18 F fluorodeoxyglucose 18 F FDG to produce 2 18 F fluorodeoxysorbitol 18 F FDS a radioactive probe for Enterobacteriaceae in 30 min 18 F FDS selectively accumulated in Enterobacteriaceae but not in Gram positive bacteria or healthy mammalian or cancer cells in vitro In a murine myositis model 18 F FDS positron emission tomography PET rapidly differentiated true infection from sterile inflammation with a limit of detection of 6 2 0 2 log 10 colony forming units CFU for Escherichia coli Our findings were extended to models of mixed Gram positive and Gram negative thigh co infections brain infection Klebsiella pneumonia and mice undergoing immunosuppressive chemotherapy This technique rapidly and specifically localized infections due to Enterobacteriaceae providing a three dimensional holistic view within the animal Last 18 F FDS PET monitored the efficacy of antimicrobial treatment demonstrating a PET signal proportionate to the bacterial burden Therapeutic failures associated with multidrug resistant extended spectrum β lactamase ESBL producing E coli infections were detected in real time Together these data show that 18 F FDS is a candidate imaging probe for translation to human clinical cases of known or suspected infections owing to Enterobacteriaceae Copyright 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 6 Issue 259 22 October 2014 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/6/259/259ra146 (2016-02-10)
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  • A mouse-human phase 1 co-clinical trial of a protease-activated fluorescent probe for imaging cancer | Science Translational Medicine
    site Erin K O Reilly Duke Translational Medicine Institute Regulatory Affairs Group Duke University Medical Center NC 27710 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Richard F Riedel Department of Medicine Duke University Medical Center Durham NC 27710 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site William C Eward Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Duke University Medical Center Durham NC 27710 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site David B Strasfeld Lumicell Inc Wellesley MA 02481 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Dai Fukumura Edwin L Steele Laboratory Department of Radiation Oncology Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School Boston MA 02114 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Rakesh K Jain Edwin L Steele Laboratory Department of Radiation Oncology Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School Boston MA 02114 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site W David Lee Lumicell Inc Wellesley MA 02481 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Linda G Griffith Department of Biological Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge MA 02142 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Moungi G Bawendi Department of Chemistry Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge MA 02142 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site David G Kirsch Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology Duke University Medical Center Durham NC 27710 USA Department of Radiation Oncology Duke University Medical Center Durham NC 27710 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Brian E Brigman Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Duke University Medical Center Durham NC 27710 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Join Subscribe Purchase Article Activate Member Account Renew Subscription Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Protease probe tested in humans Cancer cells secrete more of the protease cathepsin than healthy cells partly as a way to enzymatically remodel their surroundings for tumor growth and metastasis Whitley et al developed an imaging probe that could be activated in the presence of these cathepsins thus allowing surgeons to distinguish tumor margins intraoperatively Their probe called LUM015 was able to signal the presence

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/8/320/320ra4 (2016-02-10)
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