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  • Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy | Science Translational Medicine
    Research Center Division of Neurosurgical Oncology Barrow Neurological Institute St Joseph s Hospital and Medical Center Phoenix AZ 85013 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Timothy D Johnson Department of Biostatistics School of Public Health University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Christian W Freudiger Invenio Imaging Inc Menlo Park CA 94025 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Oren Sagher Department of Neurosurgery University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Xiaoliang Sunney Xie Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology Harvard University Cambridge MA 02138 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Daniel A Orringer Department of Neurosurgery University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Join Subscribe Purchase Article Activate Member Account Renew Subscription Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Image based classifier calls out cancer cells Ji and colleagues used a microscopy technique called stimulated Raman scattering or SRS to image cancer cells in human brain tissue SRS produces different signals for proteins and lipids which can then be assigned a color blue and green respectively allowing the authors to differentiate brain cortex from tumor from white matter Biopsies from adult and pediatric patients with glioblastoma revealed not only distinctive features with SRS microscopy but also the presence of infiltrating cells in tissues that appeared otherwise normal with traditional staining Such infiltrating cells are important to catch early because leaving them behind after surgery nearly always leads to cancer recurrence To make this SRS microscopy approach amenable to routine use in neuropathology the authors also created an objective classifier that integrated different image characteristics such as the protein lipid ratio axonal density and degree of cellularity into one output on a scale of 0 to 1 that would alert the pathologist to tumor infiltration The classifier was built using more than 1400 images from patients with glioblastoma and epilepsy and could distinguish between tumor infiltrated and nontumor regions with 99 accuracy regardless of tumor grade or histologic subtype This label free imaging technology could therefore be used to complement existing neurosurgical workflows allowing for rapid and objective characterization of brain tissues and in turn clinical decision making Abstract Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/309/309ra163 (2016-02-10)
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  • Detection of human brain cancer infiltration ex vivo and in vivo using quantitative optical coherence tomography | Science Translational Medicine
    Engineering Johns Hopkins Baltimore MD 21205 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Join Subscribe Purchase Article Activate Member Account Renew Subscription Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract More complete brain cancer resection can prolong survival and delay recurrence However it is challenging to distinguish cancer from noncancer tissues intraoperatively especially at the transitional infiltrative zones This is especially critical in eloquent regions for example speech and motor areas This study tested the feasibility of label free quantitative optical coherence tomography OCT for differentiating cancer from noncancer in human brain tissues Fresh ex vivo human brain tissues were obtained from 32 patients with grade II to IV brain cancer and 5 patients with noncancer brain pathologies On the basis of volumetric OCT imaging data pathologically confirmed brain cancer tissues both high and low grade had significantly lower optical attenuation values at both cancer core and infiltrated zones when compared with noncancer white matter and OCT achieved high sensitivity and specificity at an attenuation threshold of 5 5 mm 1 for brain cancer patients We also used this attenuation threshold to confirm the intraoperative feasibility of performing in vivo OCT guided surgery using a murine model harboring human brain cancer Our OCT system was capable of processing and displaying a color coded optical property map in real time at a rate of 110 to 215 frames per second or 1 2 to 2 4 s for an 8 to 16 mm 3 tissue volume thus providing direct visual cues for cancer versus noncancer areas Our study demonstrates the translational and practical potential of OCT in differentiating cancer from noncancer tissue Its intraoperative use may facilitate safe and extensive resection of infiltrative brain cancers and consequently lead to improved outcomes when compared with current clinical standards Copyright 2015 American Association for the Advancement of Science View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 7 Issue 292 17 June 2015 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Detection of human brain cancer infiltration ex vivo and in vivo using quantitative optical coherence tomography Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/292/292ra100 (2016-02-10)
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  • Intraoperative brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy in humans | Science Translational Medicine
    Succursale Centre Ville Montreal Quebec H3C 3A7 Canada Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Marie Christine Guiot Brain Tumour Research Centre Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery McGill University 3801 University Street Montreal Quebec H3A 2B4 Canada Division of Neuropathology Department of Pathology McGill University Montreal Quebec H3A 2B4 Canada Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Kevin Petrecca Brain Tumour Research Centre Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery McGill University 3801 University Street Montreal Quebec H3A 2B4 Canada Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Frederic Leblond Department of Engineering Physics Polytechnique Montréal CP 6079 Succursale Centre Ville Montreal Quebec H3C 3A7 Canada Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Join Subscribe Purchase Article Activate Member Account Renew Subscription Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract Cancers are often impossible to visually distinguish from normal tissue This is critical for brain cancer where residual invasive cancer cells frequently remain after surgery leading to disease recurrence and a negative impact on overall survival No preoperative or intraoperative technology exists to identify all cancer cells that have invaded normal brain To address this problem we developed a handheld contact Raman spectroscopy probe technique for live local detection of cancer cells in the human brain Using this probe intraoperatively we were able to accurately differentiate normal brain from dense cancer and normal brain invaded by cancer cells with a sensitivity of 93 and a specificity of 91 This Raman based probe enabled detection of the previously undetectable diffusely invasive brain cancer cells at cellular resolution in patients with grade 2 to 4 gliomas This intraoperative technology may therefore be able to classify cell populations in real time making it an ideal guide for surgical resection and decision making Copyright 2015 American Association for the Advancement of Science View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 7 Issue 274 11 February 2015 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Intraoperative brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy in humans Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/274/274ra19 (2016-02-10)
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  • Cancer Nanomedicine: From Drug Delivery to Imaging | Science Translational Medicine
    of Engineering and Applied Science UCLA Los Angeles CA 90095 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract Nanotechnology based chemotherapeutics and imaging agents represent a new era of cancer nanomedicine working to deliver versatile payloads with favorable pharmacokinetics and capitalize on molecular and cellular targeting for enhanced specificity efficacy and safety Despite the versatility of many nanomedicine based platforms translating new drug or imaging agents to the clinic is costly and often hampered by regulatory hurdles Therefore translating cancer nanomedicine may largely be application defined where materials are adapted only toward specific indications where their properties confer unique advantages This strategy may also realize therapies that can optimize clinical impact through combinatorial nanomedicine In this review we discuss how particular materials lend themselves to specific applications the progress to date in clinical translation of nanomedicine and promising approaches that may catalyze clinical acceptance of nano Copyright 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 5 Issue 216 18 December 2013 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Cancer Nanomedicine From Drug Delivery to Imaging Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Download Powerpoint Print Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit Alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Log in Request Permissions Citation tools Cancer Nanomedicine From Drug Delivery to Imaging By Edward Kai Hua Chow Dean Ho Science Translational Medicine 18 Dec 2013 216rv4 Nanomedicine has made progress in translating to cancer treatment and imaging but challenges still remain Citation Manager Formats BibTeX Bookends EasyBib EndNote tagged EndNote 8 xml Medlars Mendeley Papers RefWorks Tagged Ref Manager RIS Zotero Share Cancer Nanomedicine From Drug Delivery to Imaging By Edward Kai Hua Chow Dean Ho Science Translational Medicine 18 Dec 2013 216rv4 Nanomedicine has

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/5/216/216rv4 (2016-02-10)
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  • Targeted Imaging of Esophageal Neoplasia with a Fluorescently Labeled Peptide: First-in-Human Results | Science Translational Medicine
    Department of Surgery University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Henry D Appelman Department of Pathology University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Danielle Kim Turgeon Division of Gastroenterology Department of Internal Medicine University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Thomas D Wang Division of Gastroenterology Department of Internal Medicine University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA Department of Biomedical Engineering University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract Esophageal adenocarcinoma is rising rapidly in incidence and usually develops from Barrett s esophagus a precursor condition commonly found in patients with chronic acid reflux Premalignant lesions are challenging to detect on conventional screening endoscopy because of their flat appearance Molecular changes can be used to improve detection of early neoplasia We have developed a peptide that binds specifically to high grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma We first applied the peptide ex vivo to esophageal specimens from 17 patients to validate specific binding Next we performed confocal endomicroscopy in vivo in 25 human subjects after topical peptide administration and found 3 8 fold greater fluorescence intensity for esophageal neoplasia compared with Barrett s esophagus and squamous epithelium with 75 sensitivity and 97 specificity No toxicity was attributed to the peptide in either animal or patient studies Therefore our first in human results show that this targeted imaging agent is safe and may be useful for guiding tissue biopsy and for early detection of esophageal neoplasia and potentially other cancers of epithelial origin such as bladder colon lung pancreas and stomach Copyright 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 5 Issue 184 08 May 2013 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/5/184/184ra61 (2016-02-10)
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  • Alkylphosphocholine Analogs for Broad-Spectrum Cancer Imaging and Therapy | Science Translational Medicine
    this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Joseph Grudzinski Department of Medical Physics University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Madison WI 53792 USA Cellectar Biosciences Inc 3301 Agriculture Drive Madison WI 53716 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Benjamin Titz Cellectar Biosciences Inc 3301 Agriculture Drive Madison WI 53716 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Anne M Traynor Department of Medicine University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Madison WI 53792 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Hong En Chen Department of Neurological Surgery University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Madison WI 53792 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Lance T Hall Department of Radiology University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Madison WI 53792 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Christopher J Pazoles Cellectar Biosciences Inc 3301 Agriculture Drive Madison WI 53716 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Perry J Pickhardt Department of Radiology University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Madison WI 53792 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site John S Kuo Carbone Cancer Center University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Madison WI 53792 USA Department of Neurological Surgery University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Madison WI 53792 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract Many solid tumors contain an overabundance of phospholipid ethers relative to normal cells Capitalizing on this difference we created cancer targeted alkylphosphocholine APC analogs through structure activity analyses Depending on the iodine isotope used radioiodinated APC analog CLR1404 was used as either a positron emission tomography PET imaging 124 I or molecular radiotherapeutic 131 I agent CLR1404 analogs displayed prolonged tumor selective retention in 55 in vivo rodent and human cancer and cancer stem cell models 131 I CLR1404 also displayed efficacy tumor growth suppression and survival extension in a wide range of human tumor xenograft models Human PET CT computed tomography and SPECT single

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/6/240/240ra75 (2016-02-10)
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  • Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using nanoparticle-carrying T cells | Science Translational Medicine
    this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Sandra C Bustamante López Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research Cambridge MA 02139 USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Samantha S Luo Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research Cambridge MA 02139 USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Darrell J Irvine Department of Biological Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research Cambridge MA 02139 USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA Ragon Institute of MGH MIT and Harvard Cambridge MA 02139 USA Howard Hughes Medical Institute Chevy Chase MD 20815 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the View Full Text Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Join Subscribe Purchase Article Activate Member Account Renew Subscription Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Science Translational Medicine Vol 7 Issue 291 10 June 2015 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using nanoparticle carrying T cells Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Download Powerpoint Print Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit Alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Log in Request Permissions Citation tools Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using nanoparticle carrying T cells By Bonnie Huang Wuhbet D Abraham Yiran Zheng Sandra C Bustamante López Samantha S Luo Darrell J Irvine Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ra94 Nanoparticle functionalized T cells actively transport a cytotoxic drug to systemic sites of lymphoma dissemination enhancing the efficacy of antitumor chemotherapy Citation Manager Formats BibTeX Bookends EasyBib EndNote tagged EndNote 8 xml Medlars Mendeley Papers RefWorks Tagged Ref Manager RIS Zotero Share Active

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/291/291ra94.figures-only (2016-02-10)
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  • Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using nanoparticle-carrying T cells | Science Translational Medicine
    on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Darrell J Irvine Department of Biological Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research Cambridge MA 02139 USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA Ragon Institute of MGH MIT and Harvard Cambridge MA 02139 USA Howard Hughes Medical Institute Chevy Chase MD 20815 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF Article Information vol 7 no 291 291ra94 DOI http dx doi org 10 1126 scitranslmed aaa5447 PubMed 26062846 Published By American Association for the Advancement of Science Print ISSN 1946 6234 Online ISSN 1946 6242 History Received for publication 22 December 2014 Accepted for publication 20 April 2015 Copyright Usage Copyright 2015 American Association for the Advancement of Science Author Information Bonnie Huang 1 2 Wuhbet D Abraham 2 3 Yiran Zheng 1 2 Sandra C Bustamante López 2 3 Samantha S Luo 2 3 and Darrell J Irvine 1 2 3 4 5 1 Department of Biological Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA 2 Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research Cambridge MA 02139 USA 3 Department of Materials Science and Engineering MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA 4 Ragon Institute of MGH MIT and Harvard Cambridge MA 02139 USA 5 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Chevy Chase MD 20815 USA Corresponding author E mail djirvine at mit edu AltMetrics No Altmetric data available for this article Article usage Abstract Full PDF Jun 2015 6385 879 983 Jul 2015 843 129 236 Aug 2015 124 76 161 Sep 2015 182 85 164 Oct 2015 120 65 139 Nov 2015 87 28 94 Dec 2015 130 27 107 Jan 2016 309 39 87 Feb 2016 49 5 18 View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 7 Issue 291 10 June 2015 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using nanoparticle carrying T cells Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Download Powerpoint Print Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit Alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/291/291ra94.article-info (2016-02-10)
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