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  • Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using nanoparticle-carrying T cells | Science Translational Medicine
    USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Darrell J Irvine Department of Biological Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research Cambridge MA 02139 USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA Ragon Institute of MGH MIT and Harvard Cambridge MA 02139 USA Howard Hughes Medical Institute Chevy Chase MD 20815 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF Submit a Response to This Article Compose eLetter Title Contents More information about text formats Plain text Plain text No HTML tags allowed Web page addresses and e mail addresses turn into links automatically Lines and paragraphs break automatically Upload Tables and Figures Attach tables e g doc and figures jpg gif tif by choosing the desired file and then uploading them below Add a new file Upload Files must be less than 100 MB Allowed file types doc jpg jpeg gif tif pdf File names can only contain the following characters A Z a z 0 9 Author Information Contributors First name and middle name First or given name e g Peter Last Name Your last or family name e g MacMoody Email Your email address e g higgs boson gmail com Role Occupation Your role and or occupation e g Orthopedic Surgeon Affiliation Your organization or institution if applicable e g Royal Free Hospital Add another contributor optional Statement of Competing Interests Competing interests Yes No Please describe the competing interests Highwire Comment Subject Apath Vertical Tabs Submit No eLetters have been published for this article View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 7 Issue 291 10 June 2015 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using nanoparticle carrying T cells Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Download Powerpoint Print Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit Alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Log in Request Permissions Citation tools Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/291/291ra94.e-letters (2016-02-10)
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  • Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using nanoparticle-carrying T cells | Science Translational Medicine
    Search for this author on this site Sandra C Bustamante López Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research Cambridge MA 02139 USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Samantha S Luo Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research Cambridge MA 02139 USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Darrell J Irvine Department of Biological Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research Cambridge MA 02139 USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering MIT Cambridge MA 02139 USA Ragon Institute of MGH MIT and Harvard Cambridge MA 02139 USA Howard Hughes Medical Institute Chevy Chase MD 20815 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF Log in to view full text Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Join Subscribe Purchase Article Activate Member Account Renew Subscription Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Science Translational Medicine Vol 7 Issue 291 10 June 2015 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using nanoparticle carrying T cells Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Download Powerpoint Print Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit Alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Log in Request Permissions Citation tools Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using nanoparticle carrying T cells By Bonnie Huang Wuhbet D Abraham Yiran Zheng Sandra C Bustamante López Samantha S Luo Darrell J Irvine Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ra94 Nanoparticle functionalized T cells actively transport a cytotoxic drug to systemic sites of lymphoma dissemination enhancing the efficacy of antitumor chemotherapy Citation Manager Formats BibTeX Bookends EasyBib EndNote tagged EndNote 8 xml Medlars Mendeley Papers RefWorks Tagged Ref Manager RIS Zotero Share Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using nanoparticle carrying T cells By

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/291/291ra94.full (2016-02-10)
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  • Table of Contents — June 10, 2015, 7 (291) | Science Translational Medicine
    R Murikinati Jaime Grutzendler Nicole Cuerdon Laura Glick Phillip L De Jager Mitja Mitrovic Chris Cotsapas David A Hafler Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ra93 Genetic variants associated with multiple sclerosis result in increased NFκB signaling in CD4 T cells and a decreased threshold for activation Editor s Summary Abstract Full Text PDF Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using nanoparticle carrying T cells By Bonnie Huang Wuhbet D Abraham Yiran Zheng Sandra C Bustamante López Samantha S Luo Darrell J Irvine Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ra94 Nanoparticle functionalized T cells actively transport a cytotoxic drug to systemic sites of lymphoma dissemination enhancing the efficacy of antitumor chemotherapy Editor s Summary Abstract Full Text PDF MK2 inhibitory peptide delivered in nanopolyplexes prevents vascular graft intimal hyperplasia By Brian C Evans Kyle M Hocking Michael J Osgood Igor Voskresensky Julia Dmowska Kameron V Kilchrist Colleen M Brophy Craig L Duvall Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ra95 Nanopolyplexes formulated from a pH responsive endosomolytic polymer with a peptide inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase 2 block inflammatory and migratory signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells and prevent intimal hyperplasia in human saphenous vein grafts Editor s Summary Abstract Full Text PDF Integration of Hedgehog and mutant FLT3 signaling in myeloid leukemia By Yiting Lim Lukasz Gondek Li Li Qiuju Wang Hayley Ma Emily Chang David L Huso Sarah Foerster Luigi Marchionni Karen McGovern David Neil Watkins Craig D Peacock Mark Levis Bruce Douglas Smith Akil A Merchant Donald Small William Matsui Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ra96 Activation of the Hedgehog pathway drives FLT3 mutated leukemia and dual pathway inhibition effectively inhibits tumor growth Editor s Summary Abstract Full Text PDF Basal exon skipping and genetic pleiotropy A predictive model of disease pathogenesis By Theodore G Drivas Adam P Wojno Budd A Tucker Edwin M Stone Jean Bennett Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ra97 Basal exon skipping a mechanism by which a cell compensates for deleterious mutations explains pleiotropic disease pathogenesis in patients with mutations in two different ciliopathy associated genes Editor s Summary Abstract Full Text PDF Editors Choice Beware pneumonia is in the air By Marshaleen Henriques Forsythe Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ec95 Carbon and wood smoke particulates impair alveolar macrophage mediated immunity and increase the risk for pulmonary infection Full Text The slow road to memory loss By Yo El Ju Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ec96 β Amyloid pathology may impair memory function in Alzheimer s disease and aging by decreasing slow wave activity during sleep Full Text Drugging immune regulation By Alexander Marson Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ec97 A chemical screen highlights a new pathway controlling regulatory T cell differentiation Full Text On the origin of fat fibrosis By Tanya J Shaw Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ec98 Perivascular adipocyte progenitors can be tipped to fibrose by growth factor signaling in white adipose tissues Full Text Timing is everything By Masako Suzuki Science Translational Medicine 10

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/291 (2016-02-10)
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  • Table of Contents — June 10, 2015, 7 (291) | Science Translational Medicine
    Sasidhar R Murikinati Jaime Grutzendler Nicole Cuerdon Laura Glick Phillip L De Jager Mitja Mitrovic Chris Cotsapas David A Hafler Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ra93 Genetic variants associated with multiple sclerosis result in increased NFκB signaling in CD4 T cells and a decreased threshold for activation Editor s Summary Abstract Full Text PDF Active targeting of chemotherapy to disseminated tumors using nanoparticle carrying T cells By Bonnie Huang Wuhbet D Abraham Yiran Zheng Sandra C Bustamante López Samantha S Luo Darrell J Irvine Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ra94 Nanoparticle functionalized T cells actively transport a cytotoxic drug to systemic sites of lymphoma dissemination enhancing the efficacy of antitumor chemotherapy Editor s Summary Abstract Full Text PDF MK2 inhibitory peptide delivered in nanopolyplexes prevents vascular graft intimal hyperplasia By Brian C Evans Kyle M Hocking Michael J Osgood Igor Voskresensky Julia Dmowska Kameron V Kilchrist Colleen M Brophy Craig L Duvall Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ra95 Nanopolyplexes formulated from a pH responsive endosomolytic polymer with a peptide inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase 2 block inflammatory and migratory signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells and prevent intimal hyperplasia in human saphenous vein grafts Editor s Summary Abstract Full Text PDF Integration of Hedgehog and mutant FLT3 signaling in myeloid leukemia By Yiting Lim Lukasz Gondek Li Li Qiuju Wang Hayley Ma Emily Chang David L Huso Sarah Foerster Luigi Marchionni Karen McGovern David Neil Watkins Craig D Peacock Mark Levis Bruce Douglas Smith Akil A Merchant Donald Small William Matsui Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ra96 Activation of the Hedgehog pathway drives FLT3 mutated leukemia and dual pathway inhibition effectively inhibits tumor growth Editor s Summary Abstract Full Text PDF Basal exon skipping and genetic pleiotropy A predictive model of disease pathogenesis By Theodore G Drivas Adam P Wojno Budd A Tucker Edwin M Stone Jean Bennett Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ra97 Basal exon skipping a mechanism by which a cell compensates for deleterious mutations explains pleiotropic disease pathogenesis in patients with mutations in two different ciliopathy associated genes Editor s Summary Abstract Full Text PDF Editors Choice Beware pneumonia is in the air By Marshaleen Henriques Forsythe Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ec95 Carbon and wood smoke particulates impair alveolar macrophage mediated immunity and increase the risk for pulmonary infection Full Text The slow road to memory loss By Yo El Ju Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ec96 β Amyloid pathology may impair memory function in Alzheimer s disease and aging by decreasing slow wave activity during sleep Full Text Drugging immune regulation By Alexander Marson Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ec97 A chemical screen highlights a new pathway controlling regulatory T cell differentiation Full Text On the origin of fat fibrosis By Tanya J Shaw Science Translational Medicine 10 Jun 2015 291ec98 Perivascular adipocyte progenitors can be tipped to fibrose by growth factor signaling in white adipose tissues Full Text Timing is everything By Masako Suzuki Science Translational Medicine

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/291.toc (2016-02-10)
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  • stm sciencemag org content 7 291 291ra94 short 4100 http stm sciencemag org content 7 291 291ra94 full AB Tumor cells disseminate into compartments that are poorly accessible from circulation which necessitates high doses of systemic chemotherapy However the effectiveness of many drugs such as the potent topoisomerase I poison SN 38 is hampered by poor pharmacokinetics To deliver SN 38 to lymphoma tumors in vivo we took advantage of the fact that healthy lymphocytes can be programmed to phenocopy the biodistribution of the tumor cells In a murine model of disseminated lymphoma we expanded autologous polyclonal T cells ex vivo under conditions that retained homing receptors mirroring lymphoma cells and functionalized these T cells to carry SN 38 loaded nanocapsules on their surfaces Nanocapsule functionalized T cells were resistant to SN 38 but mediated efficient killing of lymphoma cells in vitro Upon adoptive transfer into tumor bearing mice these T cells served as active vectors to deliver the chemotherapeutic into tumor bearing lymphoid organs Cell mediated delivery concentrated SN 38 in lymph nodes at levels 90 fold greater than free drug systemically administered at 10 fold higher doses The live T cell delivery approach reduced tumor burden significantly after

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/highwire/citation/197464/medlars (2016-02-10)
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  • 291 SP 291ra94 OP 291ra94 DO 10 1126 scitranslmed aaa5447 UL http stm sciencemag org content 7 291 291ra94 abstract AB Tumor cells disseminate into compartments that are poorly accessible from circulation which necessitates high doses of systemic chemotherapy However the effectiveness of many drugs such as the potent topoisomerase I poison SN 38 is hampered by poor pharmacokinetics To deliver SN 38 to lymphoma tumors in vivo we took advantage of the fact that healthy lymphocytes can be programmed to phenocopy the biodistribution of the tumor cells In a murine model of disseminated lymphoma we expanded autologous polyclonal T cells ex vivo under conditions that retained homing receptors mirroring lymphoma cells and functionalized these T cells to carry SN 38 loaded nanocapsules on their surfaces Nanocapsule functionalized T cells were resistant to SN 38 but mediated efficient killing of lymphoma cells in vitro Upon adoptive transfer into tumor bearing mice these T cells served as active vectors to deliver the chemotherapeutic into tumor bearing lymphoid organs Cell mediated delivery concentrated SN 38 in lymph nodes at levels 90 fold greater than free drug systemically administered at 10 fold higher doses The live T cell delivery approach reduced tumor burden

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/highwire/citation/197464/refworks (2016-02-10)
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  • Vitamin D–dependent induction of cathelicidin in human macrophages results in cytotoxicity against high-grade B cell lymphoma | Science Translational Medicine
    this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Frank Neumann Medizinische Klinik I Saarland University Medical School 66424 Homburg Saar Germany Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Christoph Daniel Department of Nephropathology Institute of Pathology University Hospital Erlangen 91054 Erlangen Germany Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Anna Maurberger Department of Internal Medicine 5 Hematology Oncology University Hospital Erlangen 91054 Erlangen Germany Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Bettina Kempkes Department of Gene Vectors Helmholtz Center Munich German Research Center for Environmental Health 85764 Munich Germany Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Kerstin Amann Department of Nephropathology Institute of Pathology University Hospital Erlangen 91054 Erlangen Germany Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Andreas Mackensen Department of Internal Medicine 5 Hematology Oncology University Hospital Erlangen 91054 Erlangen Germany Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Armin Gerbitz Department of Internal Medicine 5 Hematology Oncology University Hospital Erlangen 91054 Erlangen Germany Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Join Subscribe Purchase Article Activate Member Account Renew Subscription Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract Infiltration by macrophages represents a characteristic morphological hallmark in high grade lymphatic malignancies such as Burkitt s lymphoma BL Although macrophages can in principle target neoplastic cells and mediate antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity ADCC tumor associated macrophages TAMs regularly fail to exert direct cytotoxic functions The underlying mechanisms responsible for this observation remain unclear We demonstrate that inflammatory M1 macrophages kill proliferating high grade B cell lymphoma cells by releasing the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin in a vitamin D dependent fashion We show that cathelicidin directly induces cell death by targeting mitochondria of BL cells In contrast anti inflammatory M2 macrophages and M2 like TAMs in BL exhibit an altered vitamin D metabolism resulting in a reduced production of cathelicidin and consequently in inability to lyse BL cells However treatment of M2 macrophages with the bioactive form of vitamin D 1 25D3 or a vitamin D receptor agonist effectively induces cathelicidin production and triggers tumoricidal activity against BL cells Furthermore rituximab mediated cytotoxicity of vitamin D treated M2 macrophages is cathelicidin dependent Finally vitamin D treatment of 25 hydroxyvitamin D 25D deficient volunteers in vivo or primary TAMs in vitro improves rituximab mediated ADCC against B cell lymphoma

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/282/282ra47 (2016-02-10)
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  • Marburg virus infection in nonhuman primates: Therapeutic treatment by lipid-encapsulated siRNA | Science Translational Medicine
    this author on this site Karla A Fenton Galveston National Laboratory University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston TX 77550 USA Department of Microbiology and Immunology University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston TX 77550 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Ian MacLachlan Tekmira Pharmaceuticals Burnaby British Columbia V5J 5J8 Canada Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Thomas W Geisbert Galveston National Laboratory University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston TX 77550 USA Department of Microbiology and Immunology University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston TX 77550 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text Abstract Marburg virus MARV and the closely related filovirus Ebola virus cause severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever HF in humans and nonhuman primates with mortality rates up to 90 There are no vaccines or drugs approved for human use and no postexposure treatment has completely protected nonhuman primates against MARV Angola the strain associated with the highest rate of mortality in naturally occurring human outbreaks Studies performed with other MARV strains assessed candidate treatments at times shortly after virus exposure before signs of disease are detectable We assessed the efficacy of lipid nanoparticle LNP delivery of anti MARV nucleoprotein NP targeting small interfering RNA siRNA at several time points after virus exposure including after the onset of detectable disease in a uniformly lethal nonhuman primate model of MARV Angola HF Twenty one rhesus monkeys were challenged with a lethal dose of MARV Angola Sixteen of these animals were treated with LNP containing anti MARV NP siRNA beginning at 30 to 45 min 1 day 2 days or 3 days after virus challenge All 16 macaques that received LNP encapsulated anti MARV NP siRNA survived infection whereas the untreated or mock treated control subjects succumbed to disease between days 7 and 9 after infection These results represent the successful demonstration of therapeutic anti MARV Angola efficacy in nonhuman primates and highlight the substantial impact of an LNP delivered siRNA therapeutic as a countermeasure against this highly lethal human disease Copyright 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 6 Issue 250 20 August 2014 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Marburg virus infection in nonhuman primates Therapeutic treatment by lipid encapsulated siRNA Message Subject

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/6/250/250ra116 (2016-02-10)
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