archive-org.com » ORG » S » SCIENCEMAG.ORG

Total: 698

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Destiny or chance? | Science Translational Medicine
    Genetics Indiana University School of Medicine Riley Hospital for Children Indianapolis IN 46202 USA E mail gnalepa iu edu Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Info Metrics eLetters Log in to view full text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Science Translational Medicine Vol 8 Issue 320 06 January 2016 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Destiny or chance Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit Alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Log in Request Permissions Citation tools Destiny or chance By Grzegorz Nalepa Science Translational Medicine 06 Jan 2016 320ec2 Cancers are caused by interplay between inborn and acquired factors Citation Manager Formats

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/8/320/320ec2 (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Destiny or chance? | Science Translational Medicine
    School of Medicine Riley Hospital for Children Indianapolis IN 46202 USA E mail gnalepa iu edu Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Info Metrics eLetters Log in to view full text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Science Translational Medicine Vol 8 Issue 320 06 January 2016 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Destiny or chance Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit Alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Log in Request Permissions Citation tools Destiny or chance By Grzegorz Nalepa Science Translational Medicine 06 Jan 2016 320ec2 Cancers are caused by interplay between inborn and acquired factors Citation Manager Formats BibTeX Bookends EasyBib

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/8/320/320ec2.full (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Eating at the right time | Science Translational Medicine
    Department of Chemical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge MA 02139 USA E mail ctraverso partners org Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Info Metrics eLetters Log in to view full text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Science Translational Medicine Vol 8 Issue 320 06 January 2016 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Eating at the right time Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit Alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Log in Request Permissions Citation tools Eating at the right time By Giovanni Traverso Science Translational Medicine 06 Jan 2016 320ec3 Misalignment of feeding and sleeping schedules can disrupt learning and memory

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/8/320/320ec3 (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Eating at the right time | Science Translational Medicine
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge MA 02139 USA E mail ctraverso partners org Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Info Metrics eLetters Log in to view full text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Science Translational Medicine Vol 8 Issue 320 06 January 2016 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Eating at the right time Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit Alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Log in Request Permissions Citation tools Eating at the right time By Giovanni Traverso Science Translational Medicine 06 Jan 2016 320ec3 Misalignment of feeding and sleeping schedules can disrupt learning and memory a concern for shift

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/8/320/320ec3.full (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Influenza antibody archaeology | Science Translational Medicine
    Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Info Metrics eLetters Log in to view full text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Science Translational Medicine Vol 8 Issue 320 06 January 2016 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Influenza antibody archaeology Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit Alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Log in Request Permissions Citation tools Influenza antibody archaeology By Taia T Wang Science Translational Medicine 06 Jan 2016 320ec4 Broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses evolve in a stepwise process that begins with strain specific antibodies Citation Manager Formats BibTeX Bookends EasyBib EndNote tagged EndNote 8 xml Medlars Mendeley Papers RefWorks Tagged Ref Manager

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/8/320/320ec4 (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Influenza antibody archaeology | Science Translational Medicine
    this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Info Metrics eLetters Log in to view full text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Science Translational Medicine Vol 8 Issue 320 06 January 2016 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Influenza antibody archaeology Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Save to my folders User Name Password Remember my user name password Submit Alerts Please log in to add an alert for this article Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Log in Request Permissions Citation tools Influenza antibody archaeology By Taia T Wang Science Translational Medicine 06 Jan 2016 320ec4 Broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses evolve in a stepwise process that begins with strain specific antibodies Citation Manager Formats BibTeX Bookends EasyBib EndNote tagged EndNote 8 xml Medlars Mendeley Papers RefWorks Tagged Ref Manager RIS Zotero Share

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/8/320/320ec4.full (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase α restores restimulation-induced cell death and reduces immunopathology in XLP-1 | Science Translational Medicine
    Oncology St Jude Children s Research Hospital Memphis TN 38105 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Pamela L Schwartzberg Genetic Disease Research Branch National Human Genome Research Institute National Institutes of Health Bethesda MD 20892 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Cosima T Baldari Department of Life Sciences University of Siena 53100 Siena Italy Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Ignacio Rubio Integrated Research and Treatment Center Center for Sepsis Control and Care and Institute of Molecular Cell Biology Center for Molecular Biomedicine Jena University Hospital D 07745 Jena Germany Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Kim E Nichols Department of Oncology St Jude Children s Research Hospital Memphis TN 38105 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Andrew L Snow Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Therapeutics Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Bethesda MD 20814 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Gianluca Baldanzi Department of Translational Medicine and Institute for Research and Cure of Autoimmune Diseases University of Piemonte Orientale 28100 Novara Italy Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Andrea Graziani Department of Translational Medicine and Institute for Research and Cure of Autoimmune Diseases University of Piemonte Orientale 28100 Novara Italy School of Medicine University Vita e Salute San Raffaele 20132 Milan Italy Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Join Subscribe Purchase Article Activate Member Account Renew Subscription Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians SAPping immunopathology Individuals with deficient immune systems may also paradoxically experience hyperimmune side effects X linked lymphoproliferative disease XLP 1 an immunodeficiency caused by defects in the T cell receptor adaptor protein SAP signaling lymphocytic activation molecule SLAM associated protein is associated with expansion of activated T cell after viral infection Now Ruffo et al report that down regulating diacylglycerol kinase α DGKα in SAP deficient T cells restores restimulation induced cell death preventing this excess expansion If these data hold true in humans targeting DGKα may prevent viral induced immunopathology in XLP 1 patients Abstract X linked lymphoproliferative disease XLP 1 is an often fatal primary immunodeficiency associated with the exuberant expansion of activated CD8 T cells after Epstein Barr virus EBV infection XLP 1 is caused by defects in signaling lymphocytic activation molecule

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/8/321/321ra7 (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Repetitive blast exposure in mice and combat veterans causes persistent cerebellar dysfunction | Science Translational Medicine
    Department of Medicine University of Washington Seattle WA 98195 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Eric C Petrie Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center VA Puget Sound Health Care System VA Puget Sound Seattle WA 98108 USA Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences University of Washington Seattle WA 98195 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Murray A Raskind Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center VA Puget Sound Health Care System VA Puget Sound Seattle WA 98108 USA Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences University of Washington Seattle WA 98195 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Elaine R Peskind Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center VA Puget Sound Health Care System VA Puget Sound Seattle WA 98108 USA Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences University of Washington Seattle WA 98195 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site David G Cook Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center VA Puget Sound Health Care System Seattle WA 98108 USA Department of Medicine University of Washington Seattle WA 98195 USA Department of Pharmacology University of Washington Seattle WA 98195 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Join Subscribe Purchase Article Activate Member Account Renew Subscription Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians The cerebellum is vulnerable to blast injury in mice and combat veterans Mild traumatic brain injury TBI is often referred to as the signature injury of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan Most of these TBIs are blast related Currently there is limited understanding of how mild blast causes persistent brain injuries There is also limited insight into how blast induced brain injuries in animal models correspond to humans with mild TBI Meabon et al report that the cerebellum a brain structure important for integrating sensory information and movement is injured by blast exposure in mice in specific areas that correspond to abnormal brain imaging findings obtained in similar cerebellar regions in blast exposed combat veterans Abstract Blast exposure can cause mild traumatic brain injury TBI in mice and other mammals However there are important gaps in our understanding of the neuropathology underlying repetitive blast exposure in animal models compared to the neuroimaging abnormalities observed in blast exposed veterans Moreover how an increase in the number of blast exposures affects neuroimaging endpoints in blast exposed humans is not well understood We asked whether there is a dose response relationship between the number of blast related mild TBIs and

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/8/321/321ra6 (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive



  •