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  • Evaluation of DNA from the Papanicolaou Test to Detect Ovarian and Endometrial Cancers | Science Translational Medicine
    this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Suely Kazue Nagahashi Marie Institute of Cancer of Sao Paulo State School of Medicine University of Sao Paulo Sao Paulo 01246903 Brazil Departments of Pathology and Neurology School of Medicine University of Sao Paulo Sao Paulo 01246903 Brazil Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Nickolas Papadopoulos The Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics The Swim Across America Laboratory at Johns Hopkins and The Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Kenneth W Kinzler The Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics The Swim Across America Laboratory at Johns Hopkins and The Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Bert Vogelstein The Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics The Swim Across America Laboratory at Johns Hopkins and The Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Luis A Diaz Jr The Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics The Swim Across America Laboratory at Johns Hopkins and The Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract Papanicolaou Pap smears have revolutionized the management of patients with cervical cancers by permitting the detection of early surgically curable tumors and their precursors In recent years the traditional Pap smear has been replaced by a liquid based method which allows not only cytologic evaluation but also collection of DNA for detection of human papillomavirus the causative agent of cervical cancer We reasoned that this routinely collected DNA could be exploited to detect somatic mutations present in rare tumor cells that accumulate in the cervix once shed from endometrial or ovarian cancers A panel of genes that are commonly mutated in endometrial and ovarian cancers was assembled with new whole exome sequencing data from 22 endometrial cancers and previously published data on other tumor types We used this panel to search for mutations in 24 endometrial and 22 ovarian cancers and identified mutations in all 46 samples With a

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/5/167/167ra4 (2016-02-10)
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  • Evaluation of DNA from the Papanicolaou Test to Detect Ovarian and Endometrial Cancers | Science Translational Medicine
    01246903 Brazil Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Nickolas Papadopoulos The Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics The Swim Across America Laboratory at Johns Hopkins and The Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Kenneth W Kinzler The Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics The Swim Across America Laboratory at Johns Hopkins and The Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Bert Vogelstein The Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics The Swim Across America Laboratory at Johns Hopkins and The Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Luis A Diaz Jr The Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics The Swim Across America Laboratory at Johns Hopkins and The Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the editor s summary View Full Text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians New Adventures of Old Pap Smear Patients generally do not enjoy getting a Pap smear but the procedure has saved hundreds of thousands of lives in the decades since its inception The now routine smear which allows doctors to detect abnormal cells in a woman s cervix before they turn into an invasive cancer was updated a decade ago to screen for DNA from human papillomavirus the pathogen known to cause cervical cancer Now Kinde and coauthors have developed a technique that may make the Pap smear even more versatile by expanding it into a test for multiple cancers including endometrial and the dreaded ovarian cancer which is essentially untreatable unless it is caught early The authors first assembled a catalog of common mutations in these cancers drawing on previously published data for ovarian cancer and new data on 22 endometrial tumors They tested 46 samples from patients with endometrial or ovarian cancers and confirmed that all 46 harbored at least some of the common genetic changes on their list Kinde et al then hypothesized that ovarian and endometrial cancers likely shed cells from their surfaces and that such cells may be detectable among the cervical cells in a Pap smear

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/5/167/167ra4.editor-summary (2016-02-10)
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  • Evaluation of DNA from the Papanicolaou Test to Detect Ovarian and Endometrial Cancers | Science Translational Medicine
    Kettering Cancer Center New York NY 10065 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Robert Giuntoli Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes Baltimore MD 21231 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Richard Roden Department of Pathology The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes Baltimore MD 21231 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site James R Eshleman Department of Pathology The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes Baltimore MD 21231 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Jesus Paula Carvalho Institute of Cancer of Sao Paulo State School of Medicine University of Sao Paulo Sao Paulo 01246903 Brazil Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Suely Kazue Nagahashi Marie Institute of Cancer of Sao Paulo State School of Medicine University of Sao Paulo Sao Paulo 01246903 Brazil Departments of Pathology and Neurology School of Medicine University of Sao Paulo Sao Paulo 01246903 Brazil Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Nickolas Papadopoulos The Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics The Swim Across America Laboratory at Johns Hopkins and The Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Kenneth W Kinzler The Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics The Swim Across America Laboratory at Johns Hopkins and The Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Bert Vogelstein The Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics The Swim Across America Laboratory at Johns Hopkins and The Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Luis A Diaz Jr The Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics The Swim Across America Laboratory at Johns Hopkins and The Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Baltimore MD 21287 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF Log in to view full text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Science Translational Medicine Vol 5 Issue

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/5/167/167ra4.full (2016-02-10)
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  • Targeting the JMJD2 Histone Demethylases to Epigenetically Control Herpesvirus Infection and Reactivation from Latency | Science Translational Medicine
    Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Thomas M Kristie Laboratory of Viral Diseases National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases National Institutes of Health Bethesda MD 20892 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the editor s summary View Full Text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Keeping Herpesviruses Under Wraps Despite the pharmaceuticals currently used to control herpesvirus infections and recurrences herpes simplex virus and its cousin human cytomegalovirus remain important medical pathogens that are responsible for a high incidence of herpetic blindness complications during organ transplant and birth defects In addition antiherpetic drugs target a late stage in viral infection allowing drug resistant viral strains to escape and resulting in tissue damage from immune mediated inflammation and subclinical shedding of infectious virus particles A big goal is to develop drugs that both target the very early events in viral infection and prevent reactivation of the virus from its latent state Upon infection of a cell with herpes simplex virus or human cytomegalovirus the cell suppresses the expression of the first class of viral genes by wrapping the viral genome in a type of repressive nucleosomal structure that the cell uses to silence its genes These viruses however have evolved in their ability to commandeer the cellular enzymatic machinery to reverse this repressive packaging allowing the expression of the viral genes and initiation of productive infection Identification of the specific enzymes required by these two viruses led Liang et al to isolate a new inhibitor that blocked the unwrapping of the viral genomes This compound potently suppressed infection of cultured cells with herpes simplex virus or human cytomegalovirus and suppressed the reactivation of herpes simplex virus from latency in a mouse model Inhibitors such as the compound described in the Liang et al study represent a new approach to suppressing early events in viral infection that may prevent the rise of resistant viral strains limit damaging inflammation and block viral shedding and transmission Copyright 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science Science Translational Medicine Vol 5 Issue 167 09 January 2013 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Targeting

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/5/167/167ra5.editor-summary (2016-02-10)
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  • Targeting the JMJD2 Histone Demethylases to Epigenetically Control Herpesvirus Infection and Reactivation from Latency | Science Translational Medicine
    National Institutes of Health Rockville MD 20850 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site David J Maloney NIH Chemical Genomics Center National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences National Institutes of Health Rockville MD 20850 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Thomas M Kristie Laboratory of Viral Diseases National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases National Institutes of Health Bethesda MD 20892 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract Chromatin and the chromatin modulation machinery not only provide a regulatory matrix for enabling cellular functions such as DNA replication and transcription but also regulate the infectious cycles of many DNA viruses Elucidation of the components and mechanisms involved in this regulation is providing targets for the development of new antiviral therapies Initiation of infection by herpes simplex virus HSV requires the activity of several cellular chromatin modification enzymes including the histone demethylases LSD1 and the family of JMJD2 proteins that promote transcriptional activation of the initial set of viral genes Depletion of the JMJD2 members or inhibition of their activity with a new drug results in repression of expression of viral immediate early genes and abrogation of infection This inhibitor also represses the reactivation of HSV from the latent state in sensory neurons Like HSV the β herpesvirus human cytomegalovirus also requires the activity of LSD1 and the JMJD2s to initiate infection thus demonstrating the potential of this chromatin based inhibitor to be useful against a variety of different viruses Copyright 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 5 Issue 167 09 January 2013 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Targeting the JMJD2 Histone Demethylases to Epigenetically Control Herpesvirus Infection and Reactivation from Latency Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Download

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/5/167/167ra5.abstract (2016-02-10)
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  • Human Cartilage Repair with a Photoreactive Adhesive-Hydrogel Composite | Science Translational Medicine
    Johns Hopkins University Baltimore MD 21218 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Alexander Y Hui Translational Tissue Engineering Center Wilmer Eye Institute and the Department of Biomedical Engineering Johns Hopkins University Baltimore MD 21218 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Norman Marcus Private Practice Orthopedic Surgery Springfield VA 22151 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Garry E Gold Department of Radiology Bioengineering and Orthopaedic Surgery Stanford University Stanford CA 94305 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Jennifer H Elisseeff Translational Tissue Engineering Center Wilmer Eye Institute and the Department of Biomedical Engineering Johns Hopkins University Baltimore MD 21218 USA Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Johns Hopkins University Baltimore MD 21218 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the abstract View Full Text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Abstract Surgical options for cartilage resurfacing may be significantly improved by advances and application of biomaterials that direct tissue repair A poly ethylene glycol diacrylate PEGDA hydrogel was designed to support cartilage matrix production with easy surgical application A model in vitro system demonstrated deposition of cartilage specific extracellular matrix in the hydrogel biomaterial and stimulation of adjacent cartilage tissue development by mesenchymal stem cells For translation to the joint environment a chondroitin sulfate adhesive was applied to covalently bond and adhere the hydrogel to cartilage and bone tissue in articular defects After preclinical testing in a caprine model a pilot clinical study was initiated where the biomaterials system was combined with standard microfracture surgery in 15 patients with focal cartilage defects on the medial femoral condyle Control patients were treated with microfracture alone Magnetic resonance imaging showed that treated patients achieved significantly higher levels of tissue fill compared to controls Magnetic resonance spin spin relaxation times T 2 showed decreasing water content and increased tissue organization over time Treated patients had less pain compared with controls whereas knee function International Knee Documentation Committee IKDC scores increased to similar levels between the groups over the 6 months evaluated No major adverse events were observed over the study period With further clinical testing this practical biomaterials strategy has the potential to improve the treatment of articular cartilage defects Copyright 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science View Full Text Science Translational Medicine Vol 5 Issue 167 09 January 2013 Table of Contents

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/5/167/167ra6 (2016-02-10)
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  • Human Cartilage Repair with a Photoreactive Adhesive-Hydrogel Composite | Science Translational Medicine
    Y Hui Translational Tissue Engineering Center Wilmer Eye Institute and the Department of Biomedical Engineering Johns Hopkins University Baltimore MD 21218 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Norman Marcus Private Practice Orthopedic Surgery Springfield VA 22151 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Garry E Gold Department of Radiology Bioengineering and Orthopaedic Surgery Stanford University Stanford CA 94305 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Jennifer H Elisseeff Translational Tissue Engineering Center Wilmer Eye Institute and the Department of Biomedical Engineering Johns Hopkins University Baltimore MD 21218 USA Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Johns Hopkins University Baltimore MD 21218 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF You are currently viewing the editor s summary View Full Text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Let There Be Light Light has long been a favorite tool in medicine finding utility in everything from skin conditions to depression to imaging Now Sharma and colleagues have shown that light can be used for biomaterials Shining light on a hydrogel mixture causes it to polymerize within a defect thus promoting tissue growth and repairing cartilage in patients The biomaterial was designed to fill irregular wounds such as articular cartilage defects A biological adhesive was applied to the defect followed by filling with a poly ethylene glycol PEG based hydrogel solution Then light was applied to polymerize the material to form a solid implant The hydrogel adhesive was tested in a large animal model to see how it worked in combination with the standard procedure for cartilage repair called microfracture The surgeons noted that the animals that received the biomaterial along with microfracture had a greater defect fill that was stronger and had more heterogeneous components cells proteins etc The authors then moved to testing in people Fifteen patients with symptomatic cartilage defects were treated with the adhesive hydrogel after microfracture whereas three patients were treated with microfracture only No major adverse events were noted in 6 months after surgery Similar to the animal studies the photoactive biomaterial allowed for a greater filling of repair tissue in the defect compared with the control group with material properties similar to adjacent healthy cartilage In addition hydrogel treated patients reported a decrease in overall pain severity and frequency over time Although further clinical testing is needed to compare long term outcomes in more patients this light mediated biomaterial therapy promises to be a versatile and safe way

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/5/167/167ra6.editor-summary (2016-02-10)
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  • Human Cartilage Repair with a Photoreactive Adhesive-Hydrogel Composite | Science Translational Medicine
    on PubMed Search for this author on this site Daniel A Herzka Translational Tissue Engineering Center Wilmer Eye Institute and the Department of Biomedical Engineering Johns Hopkins University Baltimore MD 21218 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Brett Cascio Department of Orthopedics Lake Charles Memorial Hospital Lake Charles LA 70601 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Jeannine Coburn Translational Tissue Engineering Center Wilmer Eye Institute and the Department of Biomedical Engineering Johns Hopkins University Baltimore MD 21218 USA Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Johns Hopkins University Baltimore MD 21218 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Alexander Y Hui Translational Tissue Engineering Center Wilmer Eye Institute and the Department of Biomedical Engineering Johns Hopkins University Baltimore MD 21218 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Norman Marcus Private Practice Orthopedic Surgery Springfield VA 22151 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Garry E Gold Department of Radiology Bioengineering and Orthopaedic Surgery Stanford University Stanford CA 94305 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Jennifer H Elisseeff Translational Tissue Engineering Center Wilmer Eye Institute and the Department of Biomedical Engineering Johns Hopkins University Baltimore MD 21218 USA Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Johns Hopkins University Baltimore MD 21218 USA Find this author on Google Scholar Find this author on PubMed Search for this author on this site Article Figures Data Info Metrics eLetters PDF Log in to view full text As a service to the community AAAS Science has made this article free with registration Username Enter your Sciencemag org username Password Enter the password that accompanies your username Forgot your username or password Log in Register for Free Join Subscribe Recommend a subscription to your library Help for librarians Science Translational Medicine Vol 5 Issue 167 09 January 2013 Table of Contents Article Tools Email Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science Translational Medicine NOTE We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it and that it is not junk mail We do not capture any email address Your Email Your Name Send To Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas You are going to email the following Human Cartilage Repair with a Photoreactive Adhesive Hydrogel Composite Message Subject Your Name has forwarded a page to you from Science Translational Medicine Message Body Your Name thought you would like to see this page from the Science Translational Medicine web site Your Personal Message Send Message Download Powerpoint Print Save to my

    Original URL path: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/5/167/167ra6.full (2016-02-10)
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