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  • Products - separc
    Carolina PARC Visit our parent organization Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation PARC for national conservation efforts and other regional groups Connect With SEPARC View SEPARC s profile View SEPARC s blog SEPARC Contact Information Products A listing of products information sheets downloadable brochures web resources etc created by the SEPARC task teams is below Habitat Management Guidelines for Herpetofauna Diseases and Parasites of Herpetofauna What to do with unwanted

    Original URL path: http://www.separc.org/products (2016-02-01)
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  • Buyer's Guide to Pet Reptiles - separc
    shops and are usually captive bred They generally have a good temperment and have basic care requirements Ball Python This species of python is very popular and readily available in a variety of color patterns The Ball Python is probably the best pet python especially for beginners because of its smaller size and caging requirements However you should know that these snakes can live for 20 30 years Leopard Gecko Bearded Dragon Blue tongued Skink These lizards are available through local breeders or pet shops and are all small to medium sized species with good temperaments and basic care requirements Leopard geckos are especially easy to care for because unlike other lizards they do not require UV lights Red footed Tortoise Yellow footed Tortoise These tortoises are readily available at pet stores have great temperaments and are among the best choices for a pet turtle However tortoises require a large enclosure and all species need quality UV lighting and a nutritious diet including a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables Be aware that these species can live for 25 60 years POOR CHOICES WHY ARE THESE POOR CHOICES Burmese reticulated and African pythons Anacondas Although they are readily available and are often inexpensive these snakes can grow to over 20 feet long and can be dangerous Many states will soon restrict or prohibit keeping these species as pets Most Monitor Lizards Monitor lizards are often readily available but many species can be dangerous to handle They also have extensive care requirements and need very large enclosures with quality UV lighting exposure Green Iguana Iguanas are readily available and are inexpensive but grow quite large and become aggressive as adults as a result finding new homes for unwanted iguanas is nearly impossible They are prone to health problems if not fed a nutritious varied diet and require large enclosures with UV lighting African Spurred Tortoise aka Spur Thigh or Sulcata Tortoise This species of tortoise is widely available at small sizes but can grow to weigh over 200 pounds Most turtles and tortoises do not make good pets because they are very long lived and require large enclosures Red eared Slider Turtle Although many states do not allow this turtle species to be kept as a pet they are sometimes sold illegally They require large enclosures with filtered water or frequent water changes and UV lighting IMPORTANT TIPS 1 Make sure your pet reptile is captive born and bred This will Ensure that your pet was not removed from a wild population including eggs Ensure that your pet will not have a lot of parasites in or on its body Ask the breeder or pet shop questions about where and how the animal was bred 2 Learn your local captive wildlife laws Many states have laws dealing with wild and captive native and non native reptiles These laws range from space and permit requirements to prohibited species some states don t even allow reptiles to be kept as pets To learn

    Original URL path: http://www.separc.org/products/buyer-s-guide-to-pet-reptiles (2016-02-01)
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  • Diseases and Parasites of Herpetofauna - separc
    Conservation Disease Pathogens and Parasites Task Team Information Sheet 2 Hoverman J T 2009 The bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila in amphibian populations Southeastern Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Disease Pathogens and Parasites Task Team Information Sheet 3 Hamed M K 2009 The trematode Ribeiroia ondatrae in southeastern amphibians Southeastern Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Disease Pathogens and Parasites Task Team Information Sheet 4 Cook J O 2009 An alveolate agent in southeastern amphibians Southeastern Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Disease Pathogens and Parasites Task Team Information Sheet 5 Adams C K 2009 Threat of Saprolegnia to southeastern amphibians Southeastern Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Disease Pathogens and Parasites Task Team Information Sheet 6 Baxley D 2009 Fungal diseases in southeastern snakes Southeastern Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Disease Pathogens and Parasites Task Team Information Sheet 7 Gonynor J L and M J Yabsley 2009 Mycoplasma related upper respiratory tract disease in gopher and desert tortoises Southeastern Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Disease Pathogens and Parasites Task Team Information Sheet 8 Miller D L and M J Gray 2009 Collecting and shipping specimens for diagnostic testing Southeastern Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Disease Pathogens and Parasites Task Team Information Sheet 9 Miller D L and M J Gray 2009 Disinfection of field equipment and personal gear Southeastern Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Disease Pathogens and Parasites Task Team Information Sheet 10 McGuire J L and D L Miller 2012 Ranavirus in Chelonians Southeastern Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Disease Pathogens and Parasites Task Team Information Sheet 11 McGuire J L 2012 Mycoplasma alligatoris in American alligators Southeastern Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Disease Pathogens and Parasites Task Team Information Sheet 12 Calatayud N 2012 Endocrine Disruptors and Amphibians Southeastern Partners in Amphibian

    Original URL path: http://www.separc.org/products/diseases-and-parasites-of-herpetofauna (2016-02-01)
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  • Habitat Management Guidelines for Herpetofauna - separc
    Amphibian and Reptile Conservation PARC has developed a series of regionally specific best management practices or Habitat Management Guidelines HMGs to provide proactive guidance for improving the compatibility of land management practices with these animals These guidelines are not regulations nor are they in any way an attempt to limit landowners rights They should simply be regarded as recommendations for landowners and managers to consider the needs of amphibians and reptiles in the course of their management activities The HMGs are directed towards resource managers and private landowners who have a desire to help protect amphibians and reptiles If many landowners and land managers each implement some of these guidelines then the cumulative effect can only be a positive one PARC Habitat Management Guidelines Use the best science available Are easily understood by and practical for land managers and private landowners Present measures to help maximize compatibility with existing management objectives or to optimize management actions specifically for herpetofauna Provide guidance on the management and restoration of habitats such that amphibians reptiles and many other wildlife species may benefit We have not created a guidebook that describes the needs of every species of amphibian and reptile Instead we provide regionally specific guidelines for managing habitats with the goals of keeping common species common stemming the decline of imperiled species and reduce the likelihood of species becoming listed as threatened or endangered Availability Currently the first edition of the Midwest guide and the new edition of the Southeast guide are available See below for details on how to obtain these and other regional guides new information will be posted as it becomes available Southeast The Southeast regional guide is now available online As of March 2013 an extremely limited number of hard copies are available contact High Cotton at the address

    Original URL path: http://www.separc.org/products/habitat-management-guidelines-for-herpetofauna (2016-02-01)
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  • What to Do With Unwanted Pet Amphibians and Reptiles - separc
    handle getting some advice from an expert may help Visit Melissa Kaplan s Herp Care Collection web site see the Helpful Resources Online section below to find fact sheets with advice on dealing with behavioral problems and keeping your pet healthy 2 Return It to the Pet Store If behavior is not an issue and you are simply no longer able to keep your pet contact the pet store where you purchased it Because of the recent media attention on the problems caused by pet releases many pet stores may be willing to take back unwanted pets rather than risk having it set free However you probably won t get your money back 3 Find It a New Home The best option for dealing with an unwanted pet if you can t return it to the pet store is to find it a new home Use the resources listed here to locate reptile rescue groups herpetological societies and animal shelters they will try to help you to place your pet in a new home You can also post a newspaper or internet ad or post fliers at local pet stores or animal shelters Contact local science teachers and nature centers they may want a classroom pet 4 Contact Animal Control Animal control agencies are usually only equipped to take mammals but some may be able or willing to help or offer advice However they probably don t have a no kill policy 5 Contact Your State Fish and Wildlife Agency While these agencies are not set up to take in unwanted pets contacting them for advice is always better than breaking wildlife laws and risking fines by turning your unwanted pet loose outside 6 Euthanasia Euthanizing a pet is never an easy choice However if you cannot find anyone to take your pet you may have to consider humane euthanasia by a qualified veterinarian You should not release a pet into the wild under any circumstances Green Iguanas can be difficult to handle and even harder to place in new homes Unfortunately euthanasia may be the only option for these common pets Some tortoises grow very large Your local herp society may be able to help you find a new home for these specialty pets Think Before You Buy Reptiles and amphibians are popular pets for many reasons However some make poor pets because they grow large and require special cages or they become difficult to handle Many reptiles are long lived and require a much longer commitment for care than a dog or cat Prior to purchasing a pet reptile or amphibian be sure you fully understand how big it will get how long it will live and its current and future caging and feeding requirements Ask yourself Is this the best pet for my situation or should I consider a different one Unfortunately many well meaning pet owners choose to release their pets into the wild when they tire of the animal or are no longer able to

    Original URL path: http://www.separc.org/products/what-to-do-with-unwanted-pet-amphibians-and-reptiles (2016-02-01)
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  • SEPARC Task Teams - separc
    PARC North Carolina PARC Visit our parent organization Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation PARC for national conservation efforts and other regional groups Connect With SEPARC View SEPARC s profile View SEPARC s blog SEPARC Contact Information SEPARC Task Teams Multi disciplinary Task Teams draw on the expertise of SEPARC members to address regional challenges in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Task teams meet each year at the SEPARC Annual Meeting

    Original URL path: http://www.separc.org/separc-task-teams (2016-02-01)
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  • Diseases, Pathogens & Parasites of Herpetofauna - separc
    Task Team Roads Task Team Want to Join Southeast Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Sitemap State Chapter Web Presences Alabama PARC Florida PARC North Carolina PARC Visit our parent organization Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation PARC for national conservation efforts and other regional groups Connect With SEPARC View SEPARC s profile View SEPARC s blog SEPARC Contact Information SEPARC Task Teams Diseases Pathogens Parasites of Herpetofauna Task Team Purpose This team s goal is to increase awareness of herpetofaunal pathogens and the occurrence of disease related die offs of herpetofauna in the Southeast The Task Team is developing information sheets on common herpetofaunal pathogens protocol for collecting and shipping diseased animals and instructions on disinfecting field equipment The Team also plans to develop an interactive website where herpetofaunal die offs from diseases can be reported Possible future directions include organizing workshops on herpetofaunal diseases and submission protocol to diagnostic labs Task Team Leaders Amanda Duffus Gordon College Debra Miller University of Tennessee Task Team Products Information sheets developed by this team on pathogens of amphibians and reptiles and their collecting shipping protocols are available on the Diseases and Parasites of Herpetofauna section of the Products area of the

    Original URL path: http://www.separc.org/separc-task-teams/diseases-pathogens-parasites (2016-02-01)
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  • Gopher Frog/Crawfish Frog Task Team - separc
    SEPARC Task Teams Gopher Frog Crawfish Frog Task Team Task Team Purpose This task team is composed of persons interested in the biology and conservation status of the eastern United States ranid clade consisting of Lithobates Rana capito L sevosus and L areolatus Lithobates sevosus is federally endangered L capito is known from fewer than 20 populations in all states where they occur except Florida The status of L areolatus is uncertain currently most of the work is being done in Indiana The ultimate goals of this task team will be 1 to understand the biology of these three species in order to 2 ensure that all three species are on a secure conservation footing moving into the future Task Team Leader Mike Lannoo Indiana University Task Team Products This group met for the first time at the 2010 SEPARC meeting in Ocala Florida under the leadership of Mike Lannoo The group met again at the 2011 SEPARC meeting in Mississippi This team has used a listserv to stay in contact about several issues The biggest issue is the US FWS proposal to designate 11 sites as critical habitat for R sevosa members of this group have commented and discussed

    Original URL path: http://www.separc.org/separc-task-teams/gopher-frog-crawfish-frog (2016-02-01)
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