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  • Silva Forest Foundation - SFF School
    complex where the indoor activities take place Students have a beautiful view of the forest from the many windows in the building Front and back porches provide space for breakout sessions and small group conversations Field activities take place on the surrounding 640 hectares 1600 acres which contain a natural diverse mixed conifer and deciduous forest Old growth forest remnants and Rest Creek are found on the forest land providing

    Original URL path: http://silvafor.org/school (2016-02-10)
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  • Silva Forest Foundation - Seeing the Forest Among the Trees
    it contains basic information about forests not just as groups of trees but as a living whole as a complex web of interacting organisms Herb Hammond s concept of wholistic forest use stems from a belief that the forest and all its inhabitants the environment and everything dependent on it for survival must be viewed as one unit and that a single resource cannot be exploited at the risk of endangering the others Wholistic forest use puts the forest back on center stage and moves human beings to a supporting role Hammond says The key priorities of this approach are first protect the whole forest Second ensure balanced uses across the forest landscape Any use must be ecologically responsible maintaining the integrity of the whole forest in the short and long term Herb Hammond is a Registered Professional Forester with a B Sc in forest science and forest management and a M F in forest ecology and silviculture with over 25 years of experience in applied research in soil and water degradation and practical planning systems as an industry forester as an instructor of silviculture and forest ecology and as a consulting forester working with First Nations environmental groups and

    Original URL path: http://silvafor.org/forestamongtrees (2016-02-10)
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  • Silva Forest Foundation - The Power of Community
    of representatives from the communities where we have completed ecosystem based plans Summit participants shared their stories about various ways they have used their EBCPs Participants including the SFF learned from each other about how to refine and more effectively use their ecosystem based plans Appreciative Inquiry was used to facilitate the meeting and to assist participants in enriching the possibilities for developing and applying EBCPs You can read the

    Original URL path: http://silvafor.org/powerofcommunity (2016-02-10)
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  • Silva Forest Foundation - Order Publications
    ISBN 078 0 9734779 0 0 Available by mail from the Silva Forest Foundation online from the distributor New Society Publishers or through your local bookstore Order Form Seeing the Forest Among the Trees the Case for Wholistic Forest Use by Herb Hammond second printing 1992 Available only by mail from the Silva Forest Foundation or at your public library Order Form The Power of Community Applying Ecosystem based Conservation

    Original URL path: http://silvafor.org/order (2016-02-10)
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  • Silva Forest Foundation - EBCP Project Reports
    choose Save Target As or Save Link As save the file with a jpg extension to your computer and print it from there on 11 x 17 paper Fraser Headwaters Proposed Conservation Plan 2001 133 pages 30 colour photographs 7 colour maps 21 colour figures 14 tables Report maps 11 x 17 Map 1 Map 2 Map 3a Map 3b Map 4 Map 5 Map 6 For best results when obtaining the maps right click on the text choose Save Target As or Save Link As save the file with a jpg extension to your computer and print it from there on 11 x 17 paper Ecosystem Based Landscape Plan for the Horsey Creek Watershed 1999 124 pages 15 colour photographs 8 b w photographs 7 colour maps 10 colour figures 8 tables Does not contain maps Maps can be viewed at Ecosystem Based Conservation Planning Project Summaries Ecosystem Based Forest Use Plan for the Harrop Procter Watersheds 1998 82 pages 9 colour photographs 8 colour figures 9 tables Initial Report on Methodology and Results of Cortes Island Ecosystem Based Plan 1996 63 pages 9 colour maps 1 b w figure 18 tables Does not contain maps Maps can be

    Original URL path: http://silvafor.org/projectreports (2016-02-10)
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  • Silva Forest Foundation - Russian Translations
    of key Silva Forest Foundation papers about ecosystem based conservation planning Silva Certification Silva Clearcut Ecosystem based Approach to Forest Use Ecosystem based Planning Principles and Process Ecosystem based Planning Philosophy Ecosystem based Planning diagrams Introduction to Appreciative Inquiry Ecosystem Based Management Powerpoint Ecosystem based Approach the Foundation for Ecologically Sustainable Communities Powerpoint Ecosystem based Planning Reserve Design Checklist HOME ABOUT US ECOSYSTEM BASED CONSERVATION PLANNING EBCP EDUCATION PUBLICATIONS RESOURCES

    Original URL path: http://silvafor.org/russian (2016-02-10)
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  • Silva Forest Foundation - EBCP Planning Methodology
    we protect human cultures we will protect or sustain our economies Ecosystem based planning and management can be defined as a way of relating to and using the ecosystems we are part of in ways that ensure the protection maintenance and where necessary restoration of biological diversity from the genetic and species levels to the community and landscape levels An ecosystem based perspective works at all scales from the microscopic to the global Wholistic Cost Benefit Analysis revised 1996 Conventional cost benefit analysis as applied by government and industry tends to value short term monetary returns on investment at the expense of ecological and community integrity We believe that the goal of sustainable resource development is to maintain an even flow of benefits and costs over the long term However this will never be achieved by allowing today s benefits to outweigh tomorrow s costs Our method of cost benefit analysis balances the priorities in time and space Short and long term local costs ecosystem degradation and community instability are as important as short term distant benefits corporate profits and returns to non resident shareholders This paper outlines the methods we utilize in cost benefit analyses in our diverse projects Landscape Analysis Step by Step Methodology 1993 The methodology described in this document is a step by step guide to the methods used by the SFF to carry out landscape analysis and forest use planning using maps and air photos The landscape analyses which the SFF commonly performs have two broad aims To reach an understanding of basic landscape patterns and landscape ecological processes in a forest area and then propose a protected network of landscape units which will protect and maintain these patterns and processes after human disturbance and resource use To allocate or zone forests by best use

    Original URL path: http://silvafor.org/methodology (2016-02-10)
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  • Silva Forest Foundation - Literature Reviews
    Columbia and the western States in the rain shadow east of the coastal mountain ranges Fire once played a major role in the dry climate forest ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest Ecologists now understand that frequent light ground fires maintained a sparse understory vegetation layer of fire adapted species and an open lower forest canopy Ecologists have concluded that fire suppression has caused undesirable ecological modifications to dry climate Douglas fir forests The formerly open old growth Douglas fir forests are now choked with dense Douglas fir regeneration We believe that this condition is unnatural poses a high fire hazard reduces wildlife habitat values and may be contributing to forest stress and forest decline by placing too great a demand on limited water resources The dense understory may be an important contributing factor in the increase in Douglas fir bark beetle populations Riparian Zone Protection for Small Streams A Brief Review of the Literature 1997 Landscape Corridors 1995 Evan McKenzie R P Bio assembled this literature review on connecting corridors during a land use planning process in our area The SFF advocates the use of corridors in landscape planning see documents below but corridors are far from a perfect solution to the landscape level problems caused by human resource exploitation This paper summarizes the arguments in support of corridors but also highlights the problems and nagative impacts which corridors may cause The conclusion such as it is Corridors are needed in managed landscapes but they are not a cure all or an ecological justification for unrestrained landscape modification in the area between corridors We need both corridors and an intact functioning ecosystem Mountain Pine Beetle 1989 updated 1993 In order to understand the potential for the control of the mountain pine beetle through environmental management it is necessary to understand the life habits and environmental requirements of the beetle and its host This document is a literature review with bibliography presenting detailed information about the ecology and interrelationship of the beetle and lodgepole pine Topics discussed include beetle life cycle and ecology population phases and both theoretical and practical aspects of management and control options that exploit weak links in the beetle s population dynamics Landscape Ecology Overview 1992 Current timber management philosophies and techniques operate primarily at the forest stand level rather than at the landscape level As a result given current logging methods forest landscapes are often fragmented critical landscape connections are broken habitats are lost and non timber forest values such as wilderness water and balanced allocation of human uses are put at risk Ecosystem based forest use requires that forest use planners consider both the stand level ecology and the landscape ecology of a forest Stand level ecology is familiar to most foresters and forest users as the combination of ecological factors that determines the biological community occupying any specific forest site and the biological productivity of that site However forest stand ecosystems do not function in isolation Every forest stand is connected to other forest

    Original URL path: http://silvafor.org/reviews (2016-02-10)
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