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  • The Small Ruminant Toolbox
    Organic Meat Goats and Lambs Jeopardy for Sheep and Goats instructions Marketing Strategies for Sheep and Goat Producers Multispecies Grazing Fencing and Housing Organic Production Pasture Finishing Lambs or Kids Recordkeeping Marketing and Economics Small Ruminant Production An Overview Using the Toolbox What Sheep and Goats Can Do For You Presentations created by Susan Schoenian Use as needed please credit Susan A description of each presentation is here Breeding Better Sheep Income Opportunities with Sheep and Goats Integrated Parasite Management in Small Ruminants Nutrition of the Ewe and Lamb Small Ruminant Health Targeted Grazing Teeth Tags and a TSE Additional presentations are available at www slideshare net schoenian presentations Tennessee Master Meat Goat Producers Program The Tennessee Master Meat Goat Producers Program is generously shared here by Dr An Peischel It consists of two main components a large manual and a number of PowerPoint presentations These complement each other Manual Tennessee Master Meat Goat Producers Manual PDF The chapters of the manual correspond to the chapters noted on the PowerPoint presentations look in the manual for expanded information to supplement the presentations The contents of the manual are listed in the same document as the presentation list below This manual includes information on topics not included in the NCAT manual and NCAT is pleased to be able to provide it to you here Presentations Tennessee Master Meat Goat Producers DO NOT MODIFY use as needed please give credit Listed below are chapters as the presentation is named and the title of the presentation These presentations may be used in their entirety and may be shared as a tutorial they may not be modified A description of each presentation is here Chapter 1 Marketing Chapter 2 Business and Financial Planning and Management for Meat Goat Operations Chapter 2 Goats Value Added Products Chapter 2 Introduction to Value Added Goat Products Chapter 3 Health Chapter 4 Nutrient Management in Mixed Specie Pastures for Goats Chapter 4 Forages Chapter 4 Forage Considerations for the Goat Herd Chapter 5 Silvopasture in Southeast Chapter 5 Introduction to Silvopasture Chapter 6 Understanding Genetics for Use in Goat Production Chapter 7 Reproductive Management of Meat Goat Operations Chapter 8 Nutrition Chapter 9 Part 1 Meat Goat Carcass Merit Chapter 9 Part 2 Meat Goat Carcass Fabrication Chapter 10 Environmental Factors Affect Nutrient Requirements for Goats Chapter 11 Meat Goat Structures Equipment Chapter 12 Predators and Predation The chapters of the manual correspond to the chapters noted on the PowerPoint presentations look in the manual for expanded information to supplement the presentations Small Ruminant Resource Manual At 978 pages the Small Ruminant Resource Manual is a very large PDF It s best to open and view the Manual with Adobe Reader version 6 or later If you do not have the right version the program is available for free here www adobe com products reader html The book is navigated with bookmarks and arranged by chapters Click on the sign beside a chapter name to show all the

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Courses-and-Curricula/The-Small-Ruminant-Toolbox (2016-05-01)
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  • A Sustainable Approach to Controlling Honey Bee Diseases and Varroa Mites
    Index Annual Report Join Our Mailing List Social Media Media Toolkit Southern SARE Logo Events Southern SARE Event Calendar Southern Region Cover Crops Conference National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health About Us What is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources Fact Sheets A Sustainable Approach to Controlling Honey Bee Diseases and Varroa Mites A Sustainable Approach to Controlling Honey Bee Diseases and Varroa Mites Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results A Sustainable Approach to Controlling Honey Bee Diseases and Varroa Mites Online Version Free Download File 474 52 kB Online Text Version An estimated one third of the human diet is derived directly or indirectly from insect pollinated plants Honey bees are the world s most important insect pollinator of fruit and vegetable crops home gardens and wildflowers The number of bee colonies and beekeepers is steadily declining due to the inadvertent introduction of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor into the U S in 1987 Left untreated varroa mites kill most bee colonies within one to two years To control the mite beekeepers have been using pesticides pyrethroids and organophosphates in their bee colonies However that approach has generated problems including the mites developing resistance the enormous operating expense of purchasing and spraying pesticides in honey bee colonies and risks of contaminating honey and beeswax with residue Our goal is to breed honey bees Apis mellifera resistant to diseases and parasitic mites to reduce the amount of antibiotics and pesticides used in bee colonies and to ensure that our breeding methods and stock are accessible to beekeepers everywhere A reduction in pesticide use by beekeepers will enhance environmental quality and economic viability of individual beekeeping operations strengthen an agricultural system

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/A-Sustainable-Approach-to-Controlling-Honey-Bee-Diseases-and-Varroa-Mites (2016-05-01)
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  • A Sustainable Approach to Controlling Honey Bee Diseases an Varroa Mites
    Common Ground Newsletter Index Annual Report Join Our Mailing List Social Media Media Toolkit Southern SARE Logo Events Southern SARE Event Calendar Southern Region Cover Crops Conference National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health About Us What is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources Fact Sheets A Sustainable Approach to Controlling Honey Bee Diseases and Varroa Mites Text Version Text Version Breeding for Resistance Testing Honey Bee Colonies for Hygienic Behavior Breeding for Hygienic Behavior Frequently Asked Questions Research Synopsis References Printable Version Text Version Breeding for Resistance Testing Honey Bee Colonies for Hygienic Behavior Breeding for Hygienic Behavior Frequently Asked Questions Research Synopsis References Printable Version Can t find something Ask or send feedback SARE s mission is to advance to the whole of American agriculture innovations that improve profitability stewardship and quality of life by investing in groundbreaking research and education SARE s vision is A Sustainable Approach to Controlling Honey Bee Diseases an Varroa Mites A European honey bee with a Varroa mite on its back The mites cause disease and death in bee colonies Photo by Scott Bauer Geographic Range Relevant to beekeepers throughout the U S and Canada Introduction An estimated one third of the human diet is derived directly or indirectly from insect pollinated plants Honey bees are the world s most important insect pollinator of fruit and vegetable crops home gardens and wildflowers The number of bee colonies and beekeepers is steadily declining due to the inadvertent introduction of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor into the U S in 1987 Left untreated varroa mites kill most bee colonies within one to two years To control the mite beekeepers have been using pesticides pyrethroids and organophosphates in their bee colonies However

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/A-Sustainable-Approach-to-Controlling-Honey-Bee-Diseases-and-Varroa-Mites/Text-Version (2016-05-01)
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  • Alternative Continuous-Cover Dairy Forage System for Profitability, Flexibility and Soil Health
    State Fellows Search for Excellence Programs Educational Resources Books Bulletins Courses and Curricula Fact Sheets From the Field Multimedia Newsletters SARE Project Products SSARE Snapshots SARE Biennial Reports SANET SARE Program Materials Topic Rooms News and Media Press Releases Common Ground Newsletter Index Annual Report Join Our Mailing List Social Media Media Toolkit Southern SARE Logo Events Southern SARE Event Calendar Southern Region Cover Crops Conference National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health About Us What is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources Fact Sheets Alternative Continuous Cover Dairy Forage System for Profitability Flexibility Alternative Continuous Cover Dairy Forage System for Profitability Flexibility and Soil Health Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results Alternative Continuous Cover Dairy Forage System for Profitability Flexibility and Soil Health Online Version Free Download File 2 39 MB Download this image With small to mid sized Northeast dairy farmers facing increasingly challenging labor weather and feed cost constraints it has become essential to have a flexible system where they can grow their own high quality dairy forage in corn and alfalfa based cropping systems In a SARE funded study in New York a cooperative team of farmers researchers and consultants addressed these constraints in dairy farm rotations by developing an alternative forage cropping system with multiple options to produce high quality forages This system Alternative Continuous Cover Forage ACCF produces high quality dairy cattle forage with yields comparable to traditional cropping systems and is based on soil health management as opposed to the traditional crop rotation of corn silage for three or more years without the use of cover crops Want more information See the related SARE grant s ONE03 002 Alternative continuous cover forage crop systems

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/Alternative-Continuous-Cover-Dairy-Forage-System-for-Profitability-Flexibility-and-Soil-Health (2016-05-01)
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  • Biological Control of Pecan Weevils in the Southeast
    Mailing List Social Media Media Toolkit Southern SARE Logo Events Southern SARE Event Calendar Southern Region Cover Crops Conference National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health About Us What is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources Fact Sheets Biological Control of Pecan Weevils in the Southeast Biological Control of Pecan Weevils in the Southeast Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results Biological Control of Pecan Weevils in the Southeast A Sustainable Approach Online Version Free Download File 710 15 kB Pecan Carya illinoensis is the most valuable nut crop native to North America There are more than 492 000 acres of managed pecans in the United States with major production in the Southeast Southwest and parts of the Midwest Total annual value of the crop to U S growers generally exceeds 300 million Insects and mites can cause severe crop losses in pecans Of major concern is the pecan weevil Curculio caryae Fig 1 This weevil attacks the pecan nut in late season causing serious crop losses in many areas of the Southeast Texas and Oklahoma It is considered a key pecan pest as damaging populations occur year after year Without insecticide treatments crop losses can exceed 75 percent Our research goal was to provide an alternative control strategy for pecan growers who for a variety of reasons find conventional spraying of insecticides unsuitable This includes organic growers and owners of dooryard trees small orchards and commercial orchards who have concerns regarding spray drift We attempted to sort and identify naturally occurring fungal strains that were effective at killing pecan weevils and provided improved fungal persistence in the orchard thus extending the effective period of control We also sought to develop an

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/Biological-Control-of-Pecan-Weevils-in-the-Southeast (2016-05-01)
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  • Cost-Effective Asian Pear Thinning for Productivity and Fruit Quality
    Bulletins Courses and Curricula Fact Sheets From the Field Multimedia Newsletters SARE Project Products SSARE Snapshots SARE Biennial Reports SANET SARE Program Materials Topic Rooms News and Media Press Releases Common Ground Newsletter Index Annual Report Join Our Mailing List Social Media Media Toolkit Southern SARE Logo Events Southern SARE Event Calendar Southern Region Cover Crops Conference National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health About Us What is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources Fact Sheets Cost Effective Asian Pear Thinning for Productivity and Fruit Quality Cost Effective Asian Pear Thinning for Productivity and Fruit Quality Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results Cost Effective Asian Pear Thinning for Productivity and Fruit Quality Online Version Free Download File 2 33 MB Download this image Asian pears Pyrus pyrifolia Pyrus ussuriensis are a valuable crop in the northeastern United States Asian pear orchards that are high in productivity fruit size and fruit quality can gross up to 40 000 per acre However to fetch an optimum price Asian pears must be about 4 5 inches across Achieving this size along with optimum yield requires substantial fruit thinning because this type of tree blooms so heavily In the past most Asian pear thinning has been done by hand which is time consuming and expensive To provide Asian pear growers with more sustainable cost effective thinning strategies a SARE funded team of researchers and farmers in New Jersey studied how effectively Asian pears were thinned by a synthetic plant growth regulator called benzyladenine They found that MaxCel one of several chemical thinners that contain benzyladenine can reduce the cost of hand thinning by up to 50 percent while delivering fruit yields and sizes comparable to

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/Cost-Effective-Asian-Pear-Thinning-for-Productivity-and-Fruit-Quality (2016-05-01)
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  • Cultural Practices for Root-Knot and Root-Lesion Nematode Suppression in Vegetable Crop Rotations
    Reports SANET SARE Program Materials Topic Rooms News and Media Press Releases Common Ground Newsletter Index Annual Report Join Our Mailing List Social Media Media Toolkit Southern SARE Logo Events Southern SARE Event Calendar Southern Region Cover Crops Conference National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health About Us What is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources Fact Sheets Cultural Practices for Root Knot and Root Lesion Nematode Suppression in Vegetable Cultural Practices for Root Knot and Root Lesion Nematode Suppression in Vegetable Crop Rotations Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results Cultural Practices for Root Knot and Root Lesion Nematode Suppression in Vegetable Crop Rotations Online Version Free Download File 329 22 kB Online Text Version Growers of vegetable crops in the mid Atlantic have typically used nematicides to control root knot nematodes RKN and root lesion nematodes The loss of many nematicides from the market due to environmental concerns and constraints of use such as the length of the period when crops cannot be planted following application for currently labeled fumigant nematicides have focused attention on the development of alternative methods for managing plant parasitic nematodes This publication discusses the use of non host crops sorghum sudangrass and castor bean grown as cover crops RKN resistant crops and the application of poultry litter PL and PL compost to manage RKN and root lesion nematode These methods can be used in vegetable production systems to reduce build up of nematodes over time to lengthen the interval between nematicide applications and to provide a non chemical management approach for organic growers Geographic Adaptability The cultural practices described in this publication were evaluated for nematode control in field and small plot studies in Maryland

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/Cultural-Practices-for-Root-Knot-and-Root-Lesion-Nematode-Suppression-in-Vegetable-Crop-Rotations (2016-05-01)
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  • Cultural Practices for Root-Knot and Root-Lesion Nematode Suppression in Vegetable Crop Rotations
    and Nematode Management Research Synopsis About the Authors Printable Version Text Version Nematode Sampling Procedures Cover Crops and Nematode Management RKN Resistant Crops and Nematode Management Poultry Litter PL and PL Compost and Nematode Management Research Synopsis About the Authors Printable Version Can t find something Ask or send feedback SARE s mission is to advance to the whole of American agriculture innovations that improve profitability stewardship and quality of life by investing in groundbreaking research and education SARE s vision is Cultural Practices for Root Knot and Root Lesion Nematode Suppression in Vegetable Crop Rotations Dorchester County Md Extension Agent Betsy Gallagher takes soil samples as part of a SARE funded project seeking to reduce root damaging nematodes in potatoes and soybeans Geographic Adaptability The cultural practices described in this publication were evaluated for nematode control in field and small plot studies in Maryland The practices described in this fact sheet should be effective in mid Atlantic vegetable crop production systems where the southern root knot nematode is the most important root knot species and where growing season and crop rotations are similar to Maryland s Eastern Shore Introduction Growers of vegetable crops in the mid Atlantic have typically used nematicides to control root knot nematodes RKN and root lesion nematodes The loss of many nematicides from the market due to environmental concerns and constraints of use such as the length of the period when crops cannot be planted following application for currently labeled fumigant nematicides have focused attention on the development of alternative methods for managing plant parasitic nematodes This publication discusses the use of non host crops sorghum sudangrass and castor bean grown as cover crops RKN resistant crops and the application of poultry litter PL and PL compost to manage RKN and root lesion nematode These methods can be used in vegetable production systems to reduce build up of nematodes over time to lengthen the interval between nematicide applications and to provide a non chemical management approach for organic growers Examples of different cultural practices for managing RKN and root lesion nematodes are shown in Table 1 The southern RKN and root lesion nematode are prevalent in Maryland and Delaware and cause severe damage in areas with sandy soils The southern RKN damages a wide variety of crops grown throughout the mid Atlantic region including soybeans and tobacco and vegetables such as sweet potatoes tomatoes potatoes cucumber and green beans Fields cropped repeatedly to these crops have experienced significant losses due to RKN Corn and wheat common crops in the region are reproductive hosts for RKN Root lesion nematode also has caused severe damage on potato and cucumber although yield losses due to root lesion nematode are highly variable and influenced by environmental conditions In addition when the fungus Verticillium dahliae is present with root lesion nematode potato early dying disease occurs Symptoms of plant damage due to nematode activity may initially appear similar to lack of or improper fertilization too little or too much water

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/Cultural-Practices-for-Root-Knot-and-Root-Lesion-Nematode-Suppression-in-Vegetable-Crop-Rotations/Text-Version (2016-05-01)
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