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  • Polyculture and Reservoir Ranching: Sustainable Aquaculture Strategies for Paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) Production
    Toolkit Southern SARE Logo Events Southern SARE Event Calendar Southern Region Cover Crops Conference National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health About Us What is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources Fact Sheets Polyculture and Reservoir Ranching Text Version Text Version Paddlefish Polyculture of Paddlefish and Catfish Reservoir Ranching Summary Research Synopsis References Printable Version Text Version Paddlefish Polyculture of Paddlefish and Catfish Reservoir Ranching Summary Research Synopsis References Printable Version Can t find something Ask or send feedback SARE s mission is to advance to the whole of American agriculture innovations that improve profitability stewardship and quality of life by investing in groundbreaking research and education SARE s vision is Polyculture and Reservoir Ranching Sustainable Aquaculture Strategies for Paddlefish Polyodon spathula Production Reservoir ranched paddlefish Geographic Range South Midwest and North Central regions of the United States Temperate climates globally Introduction Aquaculture is the farming and caring of aquatic organisms including fish mollusks crustaceans and aquatic plants under individual or corporate ownership Aquaculture has been almost entirely responsible for the expansion of available food fish since 1988 with production doubling in inland waters over the last decade However the majority of the expansion in aquaculture production is from Asian countries largely China Aquaculture in the United States ranks 11th in the world in terms of total production and value As a result the United States imports a majority of its aquatic foods which contributes to our nation s trade deficit as well as an uncertainty of supplies and product quality 1 Further aquaculture in the United States is expected to face strong competition from both the continued growth of imports of aquacultural products globally and from domestic poultry and livestock industries 1 Species diversification modernization of

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/Polyculture-and-Reservoir-Ranching/Text-Version (2016-05-01)
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  • Production and Marketing of Beach Plum, a Heritage Fruit Crop
    is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources Fact Sheets Production and Marketing of Beach Plum a Heritage Fruit Crop Production and Marketing of Beach Plum a Heritage Fruit Crop Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results Production and Marketing of Beach Plum a Heritage Fruit Crop Online Version Free Download File 527 43 kB Online Text Version Beach plum Prunus maritima Marsh is one of several shrubby plums native to North America It produces small distinctively flavored fruit that are collected from the wild along the Northeast coastline for small scale jam production in home and commercial kitchens The jams command premium prices at farm stands and specialty markets even in comparison with jam made from other locally grown fruit However the wild collected supply of fruit does not meet this niche market s demand Beach plum naturally occurs on sandy excessively drained nutrient poor sites This habitat strongly suggests that beach plum has untapped potential as a low input crop for marginal land Under seaside conditions the plant grows very slowly and does not bear fruit every year However the beach plum is not limited to sandy soil it may be planted in any fertile well drained soil Full sun is required for fruit production The market for many commodity crops has such low margin that growers struggle to stay profitable especially in the urbanized Northeastern United States Some believe that the future of agriculture in this region lies in high value niche market crops especially those with underserved regional markets and the potential for value added processing The existing high value of beach plum products suggests economic sustainability even at small scale Current demand for the fruit exceeds supply by a

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/Production-and-Marketing-of-Beach-Plum-a-Heritage-Fruit-Crop (2016-05-01)
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  • Production and Marketing of Beach Plum, a Heritage Fruit Crop
    on Cover Crops and Soil Health About Us What is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources Fact Sheets Production and Marketing of Beach Plum a Heritage Fruit Crop Text Version Text Version General Description Cultural Methods Insects and Diseases Marketing Research Synopsis References Printable Version Text Version General Description Cultural Methods Insects and Diseases Marketing Research Synopsis References Printable Version Can t find something Ask or send feedback SARE s mission is to advance to the whole of American agriculture innovations that improve profitability stewardship and quality of life by investing in groundbreaking research and education SARE s vision is Production and Marketing of Beach Plum a Heritage Fruit Crop Wild beach plum on the edge in the harsh coastal environment of Montauk Point State Park New York Geographic Range Northeastern U S Introduction Beach plum Prunus maritima Marsh is one of several shrubby plums native to North America It produces small distinctively flavored fruit that are collected from the wild along the Northeast coastline for small scale jam production in home and commercial kitchens The jams command premium prices at farm stands and specialty markets even in comparison with jam made from other locally grown fruit However the wild collected supply of fruit does not meet this niche market s demand Beach plum naturally occurs on sandy excessively drained nutrient poor sites This habitat strongly suggests that beach plum has untapped potential as a low input crop for marginal land Under seaside conditions the plant grows very slowly and does not bear fruit every year However the beach plum is not limited to sandy soil it may be planted in any fertile well drained soil Full sun is required for fruit production The market for many commodity

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/Production-and-Marketing-of-Beach-Plum-a-Heritage-Fruit-Crop/Text-Version (2016-05-01)
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  • Selecting Cattle to Improve Grazing Distribution Patterns, Rangeland Health and Water Quality
    Selecting Cattle to Improve Grazing Distribution Patterns Rangeland Health Selecting Cattle to Improve Grazing Distribution Patterns Rangeland Health and Water Quality Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results Selecting Cattle to Improve Grazing Distribution Patterns Rangeland Health and Water Quality Online Version Free Download File 480 73 kB Online Text Version Livestock grazing distribution is a critical concern for grazing lands especially on extensive and rugged pastures Rangeland health riparian area condition water quality fisheries habitat and threatened and endangered species are all affected by uneven grazing patterns Cattle may more heavily graze areas with gentle terrain near water than rugged terrain or areas far from water often preferring riparian areas where they spend a disproportionate amount of time compared to uplands Yet concentrated grazing especially in riparian zones may reduce vegetative cover and increase soil erosion Often extensive and rugged pastures that experience problems associated with grazing have sufficient forage but suffer from adverse impacts to natural resources from localized heavy grazing The key to resolving such problems is to use pastures as evenly as possible Most of the management approaches currently used to increase grazing uniformity such as water developments and fencing can resolve livestock grazing distribution problems on both private and public lands However these practices usually require large capital expenditures As a result ranchers and land managers are often reluctant to develop water and build new fences Less expensive solutions such as salting away from water are usually not effective enough to sufficiently alter cattle grazing patterns New management techniques are needed Selecting cattle with desirable grazing patterns and culling cattle with undesirable grazing patterns has been suggested as a tool for improving distribution Research conducted in southern Idaho found that cattle maintained certain home ranges some grazing primarily uplands and

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/Selecting-Cattle-to-Improve-Grazing-Distribution-Patterns-Rangeland-Health-and-Water-Quality (2016-05-01)
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  • Selecting Cattle to Improve Grazing Distribution Patterns, Rangeland Health and Water Quality
    Resources Fact Sheets Selecting Cattle to Improve Grazing Distribution Patterns Rangeland Health and Water Quality Text Version Text Version Management Implications Research Synopsis References Printable Version Text Version Management Implications Research Synopsis References Printable Version Can t find something Ask or send feedback SARE s mission is to advance to the whole of American agriculture innovations that improve profitability stewardship and quality of life by investing in groundbreaking research and education SARE s vision is Selecting Cattle to Improve Grazing Distribution Patterns Rangeland Health and Water Quality Hereford cow at Ross Ranch resting during midday Cow activity and position was monitored with GPS collars Geographic Range Western United States especially on rugged terrain or extensive pastures Introduction Livestock grazing distribution is a critical concern for grazing lands especially on extensive and rugged pastures Rangeland health riparian area condition water quality fisheries habitat and threatened and endangered species are all affected by uneven grazing patterns Cattle may more heavily graze areas with gentle terrain near water than rugged terrain or areas far from water often preferring riparian areas where they spend a disproportionate amount of time compared to uplands 1 Yet concentrated grazing especially in riparian zones may reduce vegetative cover and increase soil erosion 2 3 Often extensive and rugged pastures that experience problems associated with grazing have sufficient forage but suffer from adverse impacts to natural resources from localized heavy grazing The key to resolving such problems is to use pastures as evenly as possible Most of the management approaches currently used to increase grazing uniformity such as water developments and fencing can resolve livestock grazing distribution problems on both private and public lands However these practices usually require large capital expenditures As a result ranchers and land managers are often reluctant to develop water and build new fences

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/Selecting-Cattle-to-Improve-Grazing-Distribution-Patterns-Rangeland-Health-and-Water-Quality/Text-Version (2016-05-01)
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  • Sheep Grazing to Manage Crop Residues, Insects and Weeds in Northern Plains Grain and Alfalfa Systems
    State Ag Coordinators Funded Grants in Your State Fellows Search for Excellence Programs Educational Resources Books Bulletins Courses and Curricula Fact Sheets From the Field Multimedia Newsletters SARE Project Products SSARE Snapshots SARE Biennial Reports SANET SARE Program Materials Topic Rooms News and Media Press Releases Common Ground Newsletter Index Annual Report Join Our Mailing List Social Media Media Toolkit Southern SARE Logo Events Southern SARE Event Calendar Southern Region Cover Crops Conference National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health About Us What is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources Fact Sheets Sheep Grazing to Manage Crop Residues Insects and Weeds in Northern Plains Sheep Grazing to Manage Crop Residues Insects and Weeds in Northern Plains Grain and Alfalfa Systems Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results Sheep Grazing to Manage Crop Residues Insects and Weeds in Northern Plains Grain and Alfalfa Systems Online Version Free Download File 1 26 MB SARE funded research at Montana State University has demonstrated that using sheep to graze crop residue and summer fallow can address many challenges faced by wheat and alfalfa growers in the Northern Plains Researchers found that sheep were effective in controlling alfalfa weevil provided an environmentally friendly alternative to herbicides and pesticides and allowed the grower to manage erosion by controlling the amount of remaining residue The researchers also developed an economic tool that allows the user to estimate treatment scenarios for alfalfa weevil management by comparing input costs of either insecticides or grazing sheep Want more information See the related SARE grant s SW07 013 Evaluation of Alfalfa Weevil Densities Weed Abundance and Regrowth Characteristics SW00 015 An Alternative to Traditional Wheat Stubble Management Using Sheep and SW07 603 Developing

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/Sheep-Grazing-to-Manage-Crop-Residues-Insects-and-Weeds-in-Northern-Plains-Grain-and-Alfalfa-Systems (2016-05-01)
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  • Sustainable Control of Internal Parasites in Small Ruminant Production
    Internal Parasites in Small Ruminant Production Sustainable Control of Internal Parasites in Small Ruminant Production Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results Sustainable Control of Internal Parasites in Small Ruminant Production Online Version Free Download File 1 03 MB Download this image Sheep and goat production is a growing enterprise for small and limited resource farmers Small ruminants sheep and goats are adaptable to many different production systems and can be raised with relatively few inputs but they face huge production challenges Control of internal parasites especially gastrointestinal nematodes including Haemonchus contortus barberpole worm stomach worm is a primary concern for many sheep and goat producers and is particularly challenging in humid regions Grazing animals ingest infective larvae from grass and shorter forages The larvae develop into adults in the abomasum true stomach of ruminants The adult parasites feed on blood in the abomasum and lay their eggs which are excreted in the ruminants feces The life cycle continues when the eggs hatch and larvae develop on pasture where they can be ingested by the grazing ruminants Internal parasites have become more difficult to manage in small ruminants because of the parasites increasing resistance to all available chemical dewormers Parasite problems negatively impact the animals health reduce productivity and increase treatment costs Pastures with heavy stocking rates in high rainfall regions are especially vulnerable to the buildup of parasites The cost of internal parasite infection includes treatment expense reduced animal weight gains and performance and even animal death In response the Southern Consortium for Small Ruminant Parasite Control SCSRPC has investigated several methods of sustainable gastrointestinal nematode parasite control including Smart Drenching including FAMACHA copper oxide wire particles COWP condensed tannin containing plants specifically sericea lespedeza Lespedeza cuneata selection of resistant breeds and other alternative

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/Sustainable-Control-of-Internal-Parasites-in-Small-Ruminant-Production (2016-05-01)
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  • Sustainable Pest Management in Greenhouses and High Tunnels
    Funded Grants in Your State Fellows Search for Excellence Programs Educational Resources Books Bulletins Courses and Curricula Fact Sheets From the Field Multimedia Newsletters SARE Project Products SSARE Snapshots SARE Biennial Reports SANET SARE Program Materials Topic Rooms News and Media Press Releases Common Ground Newsletter Index Annual Report Join Our Mailing List Social Media Media Toolkit Southern SARE Logo Events Southern SARE Event Calendar Southern Region Cover Crops Conference National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health About Us What is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources Fact Sheets Sustainable Pest Management in Greenhouses and High Tunnels Sustainable Pest Management in Greenhouses and High Tunnels Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results Sustainable Pest Management in Greenhouses and High Tunnels Online Version Free Download File 1 38 MB Growers using greenhouses in which temperature light and relative humidity are controlled have relied for many years on releases of natural enemies to manage aphids thrips and two spotted spider mites However many of the natural enemies used to manage these pests in heated structures are too sensitive to swings in air temperature and relative humidity to be used in cool structures such as minimally heated greenhouses and unheated high tunnels Because these season extension tools are widely used by organic and sustainable vegetable growers SARE funded a project to study the efficacy of biological insect control in minimally heated greenhouses and high tunnels Researchers conducted 23 case studies involving tomatoes cucumbers eggplants winter greens and peppers grown in greenhouses and high tunnels at nine locations in upstate New York from 2007 to 2009 This fact sheet reports the results and provides detailed advice on how growers can use natural enemies to manage insect

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/Sustainable-Pest-Management-in-Greenhouses-and-High-Tunnels (2016-05-01)
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