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  • Tomato Grafting for Disease Resistance and Increased Productivity
    Your State Apply for a PDP Grant State Ag Coordinators Funded Grants in Your State Fellows Search for Excellence Programs Educational Resources Books Bulletins Courses and Curricula Fact Sheets From the Field Multimedia Newsletters SARE Project Products SSARE Snapshots SARE Biennial Reports SANET SARE Program Materials Topic Rooms News and Media Press Releases Common Ground Newsletter Index Annual Report Join Our Mailing List Social Media Media Toolkit Southern SARE Logo Events Southern SARE Event Calendar Southern Region Cover Crops Conference National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health About Us What is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources Fact Sheets Tomato Grafting for Disease Resistance and Increased Productivity Tomato Grafting for Disease Resistance and Increased Productivity Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results Tomato Grafting for Disease Resistance and Increased Productivity Online Version Free Download File 2 58 MB Researchers around the world have demonstrated that grafting can protect plants against a variety of soil borne diseases in various climates and conditions Grafting has been successfully implemented in many countries to battle diseases such as Verticillium and Fusarium wilt corky root rot and bacterial wilt among others Along with maintaining high fruit quality tomato grafting can also help overcome abiotic stressors such as high salinity excess moisture and soil temperature extremes even allowing the extension of the growing season Want more information See the related SARE grant s GS05 046 Inducing Disease Resistance and Increased Production in Organic Heirloom Tomato Production Through Grafting GS07 060 Potential of grafting to improve nutrient management of heirloom tomatoes on organic farms LS06 193 Grafting Rootstocks onto Heirloom and Locally Adapted Tomato Selections to Confer Resistance to Root knot Nematodes and other Soil Borne Diseases and to

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/Fact-Sheets/Tomato-Grafting-for-Disease-Resistance-and-Increased-Productivity (2016-05-01)
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  • Pest Exclusion Using Shade Cloth in High Tunnels
    Grant Deadlines Apply for a Grant Proposal Budget Checklist Writing Your Grant Managing Your Grant Submitting Grant Reports Funded Grants in Your State Search Grant Projects Search the Database Grant Project Products Funded Grants in Your State Special Project Reports Professional Development Program SARE in Your State Apply for a PDP Grant State Ag Coordinators Funded Grants in Your State Fellows Search for Excellence Programs Educational Resources Books Bulletins Courses and Curricula Fact Sheets From the Field Multimedia Newsletters SARE Project Products SSARE Snapshots SARE Biennial Reports SANET SARE Program Materials Topic Rooms News and Media Press Releases Common Ground Newsletter Index Annual Report Join Our Mailing List Social Media Media Toolkit Southern SARE Logo Events Southern SARE Event Calendar Southern Region Cover Crops Conference National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health About Us What is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources From the Field Physical Pest Exclusion with Shade Cloth Physical Pest Exclusion with Shade Cloth Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results Physical Pest Exclusion with Shade Cloth Alabama farmer Will Mastin describes his experience using shade cloth on a high tunnel to protect crops from some pests Mastin s trials with shade cloth were funded by a grant from Southern SARE Throughout his project Mastin worked with Alabama Extension entomologist and Southern SARE state coordinator Dr Ayanava Majumdar to improve the shade cloth technology Watch Dr Majumdar speak about the pest management strategies that he has been sharing with producers in Alabama Also available is the bulletin High Tunnel Pest Exclusion System A Novel Strategy for Organic Crop Production in the South PDF written by Majumdar and Mastin Want more information See the related SARE grant s FS13 275

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/From-the-Field/Physical-Pest-Exclusion-with-Shade-Cloth (2016-05-01)
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  • Integrated Pest Management in Alabama
    State Special Project Reports Professional Development Program SARE in Your State Apply for a PDP Grant State Ag Coordinators Funded Grants in Your State Fellows Search for Excellence Programs Educational Resources Books Bulletins Courses and Curricula Fact Sheets From the Field Multimedia Newsletters SARE Project Products SSARE Snapshots SARE Biennial Reports SANET SARE Program Materials Topic Rooms News and Media Press Releases Common Ground Newsletter Index Annual Report Join Our Mailing List Social Media Media Toolkit Southern SARE Logo Events Southern SARE Event Calendar Southern Region Cover Crops Conference National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health About Us What is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources From the Field Integrated Pest Management in Alabama Integrated Pest Management in Alabama Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results Integrated Pest Management in Alabama Organic vegetable growers in the Deep South face a constant battle with pests In Alabama new information is leading to better crop protection and more profitability thanks to the work of Ayanava Majumdar Alabama Extension entomologist and Southern SARE state coordinator As a SARE state coordinator Majumdar is tasked with bringing sustainable agriculture information to fellow Extension colleagues and local farmers Majumdar works with growers on a range of prevention and control strategies from scouting to trap cropping to novel techniques like the use of shade cloth Through research and the dissemination of strategies to improve farmers use of integrated pest management IPM Majumdar has helped growers statewide protect crops worth an estimated 2 million since 2012 From the producer perspective there was no knowledge infrastructure before the SARE program was initiated Majumdar says Interested in learning more about shade cloth In this video Alabama farmer Will Mastin discusses his experience

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/From-the-Field/Integrated-Pest-Management-in-Alabama (2016-05-01)
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  • Charleston Food Hub Brings Efficiency to the Market
    What is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources From the Field Charleston Food Hub Brings Efficiency to the Market Charleston Food Hub Brings Efficiency to the Market Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results Charleston Food Hub Brings Efficiency to the Market In 2011 when Beaufort S C farmer Urbie West was seeking new opportunities to get his produce to local consumers a friend pointed him to GrowFood Carolina a wholesaler that distributes local produce to businesses in nearby Charleston GrowFood which was newly launched proved to be just what West needed They ve taken everything extra we ve produced says West a fifth generation farmer who raises produce on 45 acres and does most of his business through a large community supported agriculture CSA program What is more he adds GrowFood gets him a premium price West earns up to 25 percent more than he used to earn through conventional distributors GrowFood Carolina which received a 2010 SARE grant to conduct pre launch market research and outreach to farmers businesses and the community is an example of a food hub an increasingly common entity in the food system Farmers deliver produce to GrowFood s downtown Charleston warehouse and GrowFood distributes it to local grocery stores and restaurants mostly high end businesses that will pay the premium farmers like West seek The potential for this model is considerable Only 10 percent of produce eaten by South Carolinians is grown in the state The 40 farmers currently in GrowFood s network keep whatever their produce sells for minus a 20 percent fee that covers GrowFood s services Along with distribution GrowFood staff promote farmers stories and values build an extensive customer base and work tirelessly with individual farmers to ensure that together they can supply customers with what they need when they need it Chefs are just so excited because really what we re doing is building efficiencies in the market says GrowFood General Manger Sara Clow They still have direct relationships with some growers but if all 40 of our growers were trying to show up at their back door every day it wouldn t work Edward Hudson of Rowesville S C echoes that sentiment from the farmer s perspective We couldn t do it without them he says There are only so many hours in the day you can t market everything the way you want to In many ways Hudson and West are typical GrowFood farmers all of whom reside within 120 miles of Charleston Both run highly diversified produce operations rely heavily on CSAs as a marketing outlet and are eager to expand the variety and volume of crops they market through GrowFood This enthusiasm is a key to the economic sustainability of GrowFood a nonprofit Their goal is to shed their reliance on grant funding by growing annual gross sales to 2 million by 2017 Clow says In 2012

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/From-the-Field/Charleston-Food-Hub-Brings-Efficiency-to-the-Market (2016-05-01)
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  • Multi-State Resource Tool Addresses Small Ruminant Production Needs
    if you don t understand small ruminants The Small Ruminant Toolbox funded by a 61 523 Southern Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education SARE Professional Development Program Grant includes the NCAT Small Ruminant Resources Manual Power Point presentations covering a wide variety of small ruminant topics a Frequently Asked Questions fact sheet tips on how to use the Toolbox and building a workshop and a Small Ruminant Sustainability Checksheet The checksheet is the centerpiece of the Toolbox and of the workshops that are given said Coffey The document which is an on farm assessment tool for farmers is an offshoot of similar checksheets that were developed from a previous SARE project for educators and producers in beef and dairy production The checksheet is intended to help producers focus on the whole farm when it comes to small ruminants and not just one aspect of production or management Part of the Power Point presentations includes the Tennessee Master Meat Goat Producer Program which was launched four years ago by Tennessee State University Small Ruminant Extension specialist An Peischel to aid producers in improving production management skills and increase profitability Since the program began the Tennessee Master Meat Goat Producer Program has reached over 1 000 farm families across the state With its incorporation into the Small Ruminant Toolbox the program has been introduced to all 95 counties in the state provided to Extension agents for trainings and workshops and given to high school students Small Ruminant Toolbox Training conducted in Georgia in 2011 Getting the kind of information out to Extension agents students and farmers that is reliable and of good quality is extremely important said Peischel adding that Tennessee ranks second in the nation in small ruminant production It s easy to do a search on the Internet but to find exactly what you are looking for from a reliable source is challenging This Small Ruminant Toolbox provides those quality educational resources all in one place Will Getz professor and Extension specialist at Fort Valley State University agrees that consolidating all of the good stuff has been a benefit to Extension agents and small ruminant producers in Georgia The Small Ruminant Toolbox and the workshops we ve conducted have been one of our most successful endeavors for small ruminant production and management said Getz who estimates that the efforts have directly impacted 40 to 45 producers across the state We ve involved county agents agriculture teachers NRCS personnel and other interested parties and they ve all indicated that these resources give them the tools they need to expand their training and educational efforts and to guide their clients Steve Jones a small ruminant specialist with the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service said that the Small Ruminant Toolbox has been instrumental in connecting Extension agents with small ruminant producers County agents jumped on it and provided resources to the producers who were hungry for it said Jones The results of the effort have been fabulous It s had the multiplying effect

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/From-the-Field/Multi-State-Resource-Tool-Addresses-Small-Ruminant-Production-Needs (2016-05-01)
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  • Southeastern Georgia Farmer, Partnering with Extension, Shows the Way to Better Soil
    the Way to Better Southeastern Georgia Farmer Partnering with Extension Shows the Way to Better Soil Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results Southeastern Georgia Farmer Partnering with Extension Shows the Way to Better Soil Jonny Harris noticed long ago that feeding winter cover crops to his cattle improves their diet his fields and his bottom line He wanted to show other southeastern Georgia farmers they can reap the same benefits but he knew he needed more evidence than decades of personal experience I understood that it was good but we needed documentation I couldn t go to my neighbor and say if you use this as a forage cover crop you can get this much production and market it for this much Harris says So Harris applied for and received a 2011 SARE grant and partnering with University of Georgia UGA Extension began conducting cover crop trials that would yield the data they needed By the second of three years they have already begun to see convincing results An economic analysis of Harris trials revealed that while forage cover crops can be costly to produce their nutritional value provides a cost effective option for farmers On a per acre basis they are expensive There s no way of getting around that says UGA Extension Livestock Economist Curt Lacy But when you convert that cost to how much nutrition you get per acre in terms of total digestible nutrients and crude protein then it s very economical The cover crops they tested grown on cultivated fields and harvested as baled silage were a better value in terms of cost per pound of crude protein and total digestible nutrients than low quality hay corn whole cottonseed and other feed options Only high quality hay was a better value Harris Greenview Farms in Screven Ga has been in his family since around 1860 It includes 2 800 acres of timberland pasture for a herd of 1 000 cattle and cultivated fields of cotton corn soybeans and peanuts Harris has been using winter cover crops on his pastures since the 1950s and on his cultivated fields for the last 10 years The soils in Harris test plots have improved noticeably Southeastern Georgia s soils are sandy and low in organic matter which means they do a bad job of holding water and plant nutrients In the trials his soil s water holding capacity has increased 15 to 20 percent and soil organic matter has increased as much as 1 percent What s really outstanding is the quality of the soil and how it s improving dramatically says UGA Forage Extension Specialist Dennis Hancock who is working with Harris I can tell just by the dark rich color The data they are collecting help document these changes Along with soil quality cotton yields also appear to be improving in the trials In 2012 they harvested 1 600 pounds of lint per acre when cotton was planted after a cover

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/From-the-Field/Southeastern-Georgia-Farmer-Partnering-with-Extension-Shows-the-Way-to-Better-Soil (2016-05-01)
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  • The Lucrative Sweet Potato Takes Root
    SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources From the Field The Lucrative Sweet Potato Takes Root The Lucrative Sweet Potato Takes Root Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results The Lucrative Sweet Potato Takes Root Small scale tobacco farmers in eastern Kentucky who are looking for alternatives due to changes in the tobacco market are discovering that a relatively easy often profitable transition lies in sweet potatoes With relatively low input and capital costs and a short learning curve they are able to earn gross returns of up to 7 000 per acre mostly through local sales Sweet potatoes are a pretty good alternative at least for our growers because a lot of the equipment they used for tobacco can be used for sweet potatoes particularly the transplanters So they don t have to buy a lot of new equipment says University of Kentucky Extension Vegetable Specialist Tim Coolong Economically it s been very good for them Coolong received a 2009 SARE grant to research and demonstrate sweet potato growing on several farms and has helped about 15 farmers most but not all former tobacco producers grow the highly nutritious vegetable Meanwhile in Mississippi the country s third largest producer of sweet potatoes SARE funded research helps the state s growers adopt sustainable practices and cash in on organic sales by showing them how they can better manage their soil with cover crops and conservation tillage Only one grower in Mississippi currently produces organic sweet potatoes yet organic can fetch a premium at fresh markets and through sales to processors particularly for baby food says Mississippi State University researcher Ramon Arancibia Companies like Gerber don t want pesticides or even a lot of fertilizers Working with three farmers around Vardaman Miss and others in Arkansas Arancibia s trials found that an organically grown crop suffered far less pest damage than a conventionally grown one In addition he focused on showing the soil building qualities of cover crops Sweet potatoes are root vegetables so they need a very healthy soil Also the soil structure needs to be very good so the potatoes can grow in a nice shape Arancibia says referring to cover crops ability to improve organic matter and loosen hard packed soils To help get the word out Arancibia is sharing his findings with the 104 member Mississippi Sweet Potato Council which represents nearly all the state s growers One farmer who collaborated with Arancibia is planning to plant a brassica cover crop on 50 acres next season to see if it will combat nematodes Back in Kentucky Coolong s on farm trials showed that aside from using pesticides to control wireworm damage sweet potatoes require few inputs and some growers are in fact pesticide free Sweet potatoes have low nitrogen needs and in eastern Kentucky do not require irrigation except in the case of extreme drought There are a lot of nuances with sweet potato production

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/From-the-Field/The-Lucrative-Sweet-Potato-Takes-Root (2016-05-01)
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  • Thousands Trained in Renewable Energy and Efficiency
    Join Our Mailing List Social Media Media Toolkit Southern SARE Logo Events Southern SARE Event Calendar Southern Region Cover Crops Conference National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health About Us What is Sustainable Agriculture History of SSARE Advisory Leadership Contact SSARE AC State Coordinator Tools SARE Travel Home Educational Resources From the Field Thousands Trained in Renewable Energy and Efficiency Thousands Trained in Renewable Energy and Efficiency Looking for something different Search the Learning Center Back to Search Results Thousands Trained in Renewable Energy and Efficiency As fossil fuel prices rise across the country farmers are feeling the pinch especially in the economically hard hit areas of the rural South Too many tractor passes can break a year s profits as can the use of fans machinery and other equipment running on expensive non renewable fuels Yet the South has been relatively slow to adopt renewable energy and efficiency measures according to energy specialists in the region in large part because of a lack of information and training That started to change with a three day training session that sent a ripple through ag educators in the South Within a year that one training with 26 educators led to 44 local events and the training of at least 2 600 farmers ranchers and others in the latest renewable energy and efficiency technologies We felt this train the trainer concept really fit the energy topic well especially in the South says Mike Morris an energy specialist with the National Center for Appropriate Technology NCAT which used a SARE grant to conduct the training These topics present a lot of economic opportunity for rural America Conducted by Morris and Steve Moore small farm manager at North Carolina s Center for Environmental Farming Systems the training covered a wide range of topics including biofuels strategies for improving energy efficiency wind and solar energy and working with utilities and equipment suppliers among other topics Participants visited a wood burning biomass power plant a solar water heated greenhouse and an energy efficient dairy along with hands on demonstrations with biofuel refining and solar equipment An emphasis was put on the sustainability of on farm energy particularly with biofuels Morris says It was not just about producing bioenergy but doing it in a way that protects soil and water The training s organizers encouraged participants to stay connected with each other and become expert resources for their extension colleagues and rural constituents on the many energy related incentive programs available at the local state and national level For example Alcorn State University Extension Specialist Elizabeth Myles attended the training to broaden her knowledge of sustainable energy topics and build professional relationships Now equipped with a large repertoire of educational materials she is planning to conduct two sustainable energy workshops for Mississippi farmers in 2012 and more workshops in Alabama and Georgia Another long term success Morris points to a training graduate in Texas Marion County Extension Agent Brock Fry who began telling local farmers about

    Original URL path: http://www.southernsare.org/Educational-Resources/From-the-Field/Thousands-Trained-in-Renewable-Energy-and-Efficiency (2016-05-01)
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