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  • The Wireless Operators
    SOS CQD DE MGY MGY CQD was the common international distress signal in use at the time SOS was a newer distress signal DE is the international code meaning from adopted from the French preposition of the same meaning MGY was the Titanic s call signal The signal was keyed by Jack Phillips Ship to shore wireless transmissions was in its infancy and was viewed as more of a convenience rather than a means of an integral part of the ships command The operators were under the Captain s command but only as far as receiving and transmitting messages of importance of the ship Their main job was tending to the passengers telegrams while at sea The ships weather reports and ship to ship telegrams came second as they weren t paying customers The Titanic s wireless equipment was the most powerful in use at the time The main transmitter was a rotary spark design powered by a 5 kW motor alternator fed from the ship s lighting circuit The equipment operated into a 4 wire antenna suspended between the ship s 2 masts some 250 feet above the sea There was also a battery powered emergency transmitter The main

    Original URL path: http://www.starway.org/Titanic/Wireless_Operators.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Passengers
    Mr Charles Davis Mrs Agnes Davis Master John M Davis Miss Mary Deacon Mr Percy del Carlo Mr Sebastian del Carlo Mrs Denbou Mr Herbert Dibden Mr William Doling Mrs Ada Doling Miss Elsie Downton Mr William J Drachstedt Baron von Drew Mr James V Drew Mrs Lulu Drew Master Marshall Duran Miss Florentina Duran Miss Asimcion Eitemiller Mr G F Enander Mr Ingvar Fahlstrom Mr Arne J Faunthorpe Mr Harry Faunthorpe Mrs Lizzie Fillbrook Mr Charles Fox Mr Stanley H Funk Miss Annie Fynney Mr Jos Gale Mr Harry Gale Mr Shadrach Garside Miss Ethel Gaskell Mr Alfred Gavey Mr Lawrence Gilbert Mr William Giles Mr Edgar Giles Mr Fred Giles Mr Ralph Gill Mr John Gillespie Mr William Givard Mr Hans K Greenberg Mr Samuel Hale Mr Reginald Hamalainer Mrs Anna and Infant Harbeck Mr Wm H Harper Mr John Harper Miss Nina Harris Mr George Harris Mr Walter Hart Mr Benjamin Hart Mrs Esther Hart Miss Eva Herman Miss Alice Herman Mrs Jane Herman Miss Kate Herman Mr Samuel Hewlett Mrs Mary D Hickman Mr Leonard Hickman Mr Lewis Hickman Mr Stanley Hiltunen Miss Martha Hocking Mr George Hocking Mrs Elizabeth Hocking Miss Nellie Hocking Mr Samuel J Hodges Mr Henry P Hoffman Mr and two children Loto and Louis Hold Mrs Annie Hold Mr Stephen Hood Mr Ambrose Hosono Mr Masabumi Howard Mr Benjamin Howard Mrs Ellen T Hunt Mr George Ilett Miss Bertha Jacobsohn Mrs Amy P Jacobsohn Mr Sidney S Jarvis Mr John D Jefferys Mr Clifford Jefferys Mr Ernest Jenkin Mr Stephen Jervan Mrs A T Kantor Mrs Miriam Kantor Mr Sehua Karnes Mrs J F Keane Mr Daniel Keane Miss Nora A Kelly Mrs F Kirkland Rev Charles L Kvillner Mr John Henrik Lahtinen Mrs Anna Lahtinen Mr William Lamb Mr J J Lamore Mrs Ameliar Laroche Mr Joseph Laroche Mrs Juliet Laroche Miss Louise Laroche Miss Simonne Lehman Miss Bertha Leitch Miss Jessie Levy Mr R J Leyson Mr Robert W N Lingan Mr John Louch Mr Charles Louch Mrs Alice Adela Mack Mrs Mary Malachard Mr Noel Mallet Mr A Mallet Mrs Mallet Master A Mangiavacchi Mr Emilio Mantvila Mr Joseph Marshall Mr Marshall Mrs Kate Matthews Mr W J Maybery Mr Frank H McCrae Mr Arthur G McCrie Mr James McKane Mr Peter D Mellers Mr William Mellinger Mrs Elizabeth and Child Meyer Mr August Milling Mr Jacob C Mitchell Mr Henry Morawick Dr Ernest Mudd Mr Thomas C Myles Mr Thomas F Nasser Mr Nicolas Nasser Mrs Nesson Mr Israel Nicholls Mr Joseph C Norman Mr Robert D Nye Mrs Elizabeth Otter Mr Richard Oxenham Mr P Thomas Padro Mr Julian Pain Dr Alfred Pallas Mr Emilio Parker Mr Clifford R Parrish Mrs L Davis Pengelly Mr Frederick Pernot Mr Rene Peruschitz Rev Jos M Phillips Mr Robert Phillips Miss Alice Pinsky Miss Rosa Ponesell Mr Martin Portaluppi Mr Emilio Pulbaun Mr Frank Quick Mrs Jane Quick Miss Vera W Quick Miss Phyllis Reeves Mr David Renouf Mr Peter H Renouf Miss Lillie Reynolds Miss E Richard Mr Emile Richards Mrs Emily Richards Master William Richards Master George Ridsdale Miss Lucy Rogers Mr Harry Rogers Miss Selina Rugg Miss Emily Sedgwick Mr C F W Sharp Mr Percival Shelley Mrs Imanita Silven Miss Lyyli Sincook Miss Maude Sinkkenen Miss Anna Sjostedt Mr Ernest A Slayter Miss H M Slemen Mr Richard J Smith Mr Augustus Smith Miss Marion Sobey Mr Hayden Stanton Mr S Ward Stokes Mr Phillip J Swane Mr George Sweet Mr George Toomey Miss Ellen Trant Miss Jessie Tronpiansky Mr Moses A Troutt Miss E Celia Tupin M Dorothy Turpin Mr William J Veale Mr James Walcroft Miss Nellie Ware Mrs Florence L Ware Mr John James Ware Mr William J Watt Miss Bertha Watt Mrs Bessie Webber Miss Susiev Weisz Mr Leopold Weisz Mrs Matilda Wells Mrs Addie Wells Miss J Wells Master Ralph West Mr E Arthur West Mrs Ada West Miss Barbara West Miss Constance Wheadon Mr Edward Wheeler Mr Edwin Third Class Passengers British Southampton Embarkment top Abbott Eugene Abbott Rosa Abbott Rossmore Abbing Anthony Adams J Aks Filly Aks Leah Alexander William Allen William Allum Owen G Badman Emily Barton David Beavan W T Billiard A van Billiard James child Billiard Walter child Bing Lee Bowen David Braund Lewis Braund Owen Brocklebank William Cann Erenst Carver A Celotti Francesco Chip Chang Christmann Emil Cohen Gurshon Cook Jacob Corn Harry Coutts Winnie Coutts William child Coutts Leslie child Coxon Daniel Crease Ernest James Cribb John Hatfield Cribb Alice Dahl Charles Davies Evan Davies Alfred Davies John Davies Joseph Davison Thomas H Davison Mary Dean Mr Bertram F Dean Mrs Hetty Dean Bertran child Dean Vera infant Dennis Samuel Dennis William Derkings Edward Dowdell Elizabeth Drapkin Jenie Dugemin Joseph Elsbury James Emanuel Ethet child Everett Thomas J Foo Choong Ford Arthur Ford Margaret Ford Mrs D M Ford Mr E W Ford M W T N Ford Maggie child Franklin Charles Garthfirth John Gilinski Leslie Godwin Frederick Goldsmith Frank J Goldsmith Emily A Goldsmith Frank J W Goodwin Augusta Goodwin Lillian A Goodwin Charles E Goodwin William F child Goodwin Jessie child Goodwin Harold child Goodwin Sidney child Green George Guest Robert Harknett Alice Harmer Abraham Hee Ling Howard May Hyman Abraham Johnston A G Johnston Mrs Johnston William child Johnston Mrs C H child Johnson Mr A Johnson Mr W Keefe Arthur Kelly James Lam Ali Lam Len Lang Fang Leonard Mr L Lester J Ling Lee Lithman Simon Lobb Cordelia Lobb William A Lockyer Edward Lovell John MacKay George W Maisner Simon McNamee Eileen McNamee Neal Meanwell Marian O Meek Annie L Meo Alfonso Miles Frank Moor Beile Moor Meier Moore Leonard C Morley William Moutal Rahamin Murdlin Joseph Nancarrow W H Niklasen Sander Nosworthy Richard C Peacock Alfred Peacodc Treasteall Peacock Treasteall child Pearce Ernest Peduzzi Joseph Perkin John Henry Peterson Marius Potchett George Rath Sarah Reed James George Reynolds Harold Risien Emma Risien Samuel Robins Alexander Robins Charity

    Original URL path: http://www.starway.org/Titanic/Passengers.html (2016-02-09)
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  • The Bands
    also much confusion on what their last song was From the lifeboats a number of different songs were heard Among them is Nearer My God to Thee Both the American and British survivors recall hearing it This hymn is ordinarily played to entirely different music on both sides of the Atlantic Three different tunes in all I find it very unlikely they played all three versions Also in the running is the hymn Autumn and Songe d Automne It is important to note that there were two separate bands on the Titanic and they had two totally different playing styles None of the band members survived The Band was supplied by the Black talent Agency of Liverpool They signed on the ship for a shilling a month but were listed as second class passengers They were clearly under the Captain s authority but worked for and were paid by the Black Agency After the ship floundered nobody wanted to take responsibility for the lives of the Bandsmen It seems they weren t covered by anybody s insurance policy The White Star Line said that the Band worked for the Blacks and therefore covered by them and the Blacks argued that

    Original URL path: http://www.starway.org/Titanic/Bands.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Lifeboats
    boats 27 5 long by 8 0 by 3 0 deep with a capacity of 40 persons each All lifeboats were fitted with Murrays disengaging gear to simultaneously free both ends The lifeboats were stowed on hinged wood chocks on the top Deck In addition to the lifeboats The Titanic carried 3560 life belts jackets and 49 life buoys The top Deck There is wide belief that the Titanic s

    Original URL path: http://www.starway.org/Titanic/Lifeboats.html (2016-02-09)
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  • The Californian
    not consistent The CA was too far away perhaps as far as 19 to 30 miles away The ship seen from the Titanic was moving and the CA was stationary There might have been one or more ships between the Titanic and the CA The Anti Lordites Those opposing the Lordite viewpoint contest that The two enquiries came to the correct conclusion based on the testimony The numerous discrepancies do not need to be reconciled as they are minor in comparison with the evidence regarding the rockets Estimates of time distance bearings etc are only that estimates The respective movements of each ship correspond precisely The CA was indeed stopped but swinging her bow with the current which gave the illusion of motion as seen from the Titanic The presence of a third ship real or theoretical is irrelevant after the CA s sighting of distress rockets The discrepancies and points of argument are too many to list individually here many books have been written since 1912 covering these various aspects The above is but a summary of recurring statements given by both sides The Mystery Ship If there was indeed a mystery ship what could it be The Californian because her officers saw 8 rockets at about the same time the Titanic fired a similar number No ship firing rockets has been discovered in addition to the Titanic and Carpathia This was the reasoning given by the British BOT Inquiry The Samson a Norwegian sealer because of a diary published by her first officer sometime in 1960s This story largely persists even though it was rejected by the Lordites themselves as too speculative in the late 1960s The Mt Temple from second hand allegations that one of her officers saw rockets as they approached the ice field around 3

    Original URL path: http://www.starway.org/Titanic/Californian.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Artifacts
    including Titanic s foremast navigational lamp a bronze cherub the ship s whistles silver dinnerware fine china gold coins jewelry delicate paper objects such as a stock certificate and personal letters communications and navigational gear and a piece of one of Titanic s massive engines Hear the personal stories of loss and see why the world mourned Beginning November 15 1997 Titanic The Exhibition will be presented until May 15 1998 Tickets are now on sale and can be purchased by calling 1 800 777 9882 More information can also be found by visiting the Florida International Museum s web site at http www floridamuseum org After its premiere in Norfolk Virginia at Nauticus The National Maritime Center Titanic The Expedition makes its West Coast debut aboard the legendary Queen Mary Now being presented until January 4 1998 the exhibition features Titanic artifacts and a display of state of the art technology and deep sea equipment used in the August 1996 recovery of the artifacts by RMS Titanic Inc Among the exhibition s featured artifacts is a selection of White Star Line dishware and a personal letter written more than eight decades ago Other wet items being displayed in water until conservation treatment is complete include one of Titanic s whistles a pair of binoculars a porthole and a silver soup tureen recently featured in the magazine Art Antiques as one of the 100 Top Treasures of 1996 For more information on tickets and reservations visit the Queen Mary web site at http www queenmary com or call 562 435 3511 Speicherstadt the historic maritime center of Hamburg Germany is the site of the largest exhibit of Titanic artifacts ever shown in Europe This exhibition is presented by Voyager Titanic GmbH in association with RMS Titanic Inc and contains approximately

    Original URL path: http://www.starway.org/Titanic/Artifacts.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Titanic's Sister Ships
    the White Swan Hotel Alnwick England and the famous Honour and Glory Crowning Time wood carving can be seen in the Southampton Maritime Museum Recommended Reading RMS Olympic The Old Reliable by Simon Mills Publisher Waterfront Publications ISBN 0 946184 79 8 HMHS Britannic HMHS Britannic at Mudros on 3rd October 1916 Britannic started life under the cloud of the Titanic disaster from the start she was expected to be named Gigantic but she was built as Britannic considered by White Star as a lucky name the White Star Line had three ships named Britannic over the years HMHS Britannic was the second In appearance the Britannic resembled the Titanic having an enclosed promenade A Deck but one large difference was the lifeboat davits which were much more prominent on the Britannic Below decks the Britannic was similar to her sisters but additional safety features such as a double skin were built in rather than retrofitted Although her service speed was not intended to be increased she was fitted with a more powerful turbine capable of developing 18 000HP compared to the 16 000HP of the Olympic it was the largest marine turbine in the world Launched on 26th February 1914 fitting out was delayed by WW1 and financial industrial difficulties On 13th November 1915 the Britannic was requisitioned as a hospital ship becoming HMHS His Majesty s Hospital Ship Britannic Receiving a coat of brilliant white paint with huge red crosses each lit by 125 lights On 11th December 1915 she left Belfast and started her short career On 8 12am on 21st November 1916 Britannic struck a mine some still contest it was a torpedo in the Kea Channel Aegean Sea Despite her improved safety features the Britannic began to sink in a cruel copycat of her sister

    Original URL path: http://www.starway.org/Titanic/Sister_Ships.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Titan - The Other Titanic
    resembled the Titanic disaster Both ships were British and sailed in April with a top speed of 24 25 knots They had the same passenger capacity of 3 000 but sailed with a little over 2 000 Also they were between 800 and 900 feet long and driven with triple propellers Here s the clincher both ships sank after being pierced by an iceberg on their starboard side You can

    Original URL path: http://www.starway.org/Titanic/Titan.html (2016-02-09)
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