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  • 3 - Financial Management & Audits - Managing Public Grants
    Federal Indirect Rate Consider the amount of the award and the actual amount of indirect costs that may be recovered Consider the amount of time your organization will have to invest in preparing and submitting the indirect rate proposal and negotiating the indirect rate Expenses associated with your project can be shared with your awarding agency Download this Federal Cost Sharing Requirements guide to help you navigate your costs You need Adobe Flash Player to view some content on this site Earnings generated through an activity supported by a public grant are considered program income Program income is defined in 45 CFR 74 as income earned by the recipient that is directly generated by a supported activity or earned as a result of the award Program income includes but is not limited to income from fees for services performed the use or rental of real or personal property acquired under Federally funded projects the sale of commodities or items fabricated under an award license fees and royalties on patents and copyrights and interest on loans made with award funds Interest earned on advances of Federal funds is not program income Except as otherwise provided in the terms and conditions of the award program income also does not include the receipt of principal on loans rebates credits discounts etc or interest earned on any of them Furthermore program income does not include taxes special assessments or levies and fines raised by government recipients Program income earned during the project period is retained by your organization for use as specified by the Federal awarding agency in the award document In the event that the Federal awarding agency does not specify in its regulations or the terms and conditions of the award how program income is to be used the regulations in 2 CFR 215 will provide you with specific instructions Organizations must submit financial reports to the Federal awarding agency Financial reporting requirements for your project are specified in your award package issued by the Federal awarding agency For more detailed information about requirements for financial management systems payment methods and rules for cost sharing and matching requirements accounting for program income and establishing fund availability see OMB Circular A 110 subpart C You will likely be required to submit financial reports to both the Federal awarding agency and the Division of Payment Management The Federal Financial Report is the financial reporting form for most of these reports It combines the PSC 272 previously used by DPM and the SF 269 used by grants management offices DPM has fully implemented the switch to the FFR however many grants management offices may still be using the SF 269 Be sure to use whichever financial report is required by the grants officer The Federal awarding agency determines the Financial Status Report deadlines The Division of Payment Management requires you to submit quarterly reports FFR that certify the disbursement of the funds within fifteen calendar days of the end of each quarter It is important

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  • 4 - Property Management - Managing Public Grants
    the Federal awarding agency User charges earned will be treated as program income You may use the equipment in the project or program for which it was acquired as long as needed whether or not the project or program continues to be supported by Federal funds When no longer needed for the original project or program you may use the equipment in connection with other Federally sponsored activities For specific instructions regarding equipment use and disposition see 2 CFR 215 Section 34 Titles to equipment acquired with Federal funds vest in the recipient provided it is not used to provide services to non Federal outside organizations for a fee that is less than private companies charge for equivalent services unless specifically authorized by Federal statute for as long as the Federal government retains an interest in the equipment Your property management standards for equipment acquired with Federal funds and Federally owned equipment must include all of the following Equipment records including the following information A description of the equipment Manufacturer s serial number model number Federal stock number national stock number or other identification number Source of the equipment including the award number Whether title vests in the recipient or the Federal government Acquisition date or date received if the equipment was furnished by the Federal government and cost Information from which one can calculate the percentage of Federal participation in the cost of the equipment not applicable to equipment furnished by the Federal government Location and condition of the equipment and the date the information was reported Unit acquisition cost Ultimate disposition data including date of disposal and sale price or the method used to determine current fair market value where a recipient compensates the Federal awarding agency for its share Equipment owned by the Federal government must be identified to indicate Federal ownership A physical inventory of equipment must be taken and the results reconciled with the equipment records at least once every two years A control system that ensures adequate safeguards to prevent loss damage or theft of the equipment must be in effect Adequate maintenance procedures should be implemented to keep the equipment in good condition If authorized or required to sell the equipment proper sales procedures providing for competition and resulting in the highest possible return should be used Upon award completion and closeout equipment records must be maintained but report only equipment valued at over 5 000 Property acquired with Federal funds is under your ownership given you are using it for the purpose of an authorized project The title to real property acquired with Federal funds is vested with your organization provided it is used for the authorized purpose of the project for as long as it is needed When you determine the property is no longer needed for the purpose of the original project you must obtain written approval by the Federal awarding agency for the use of real property in other Federally sponsored projects Use in other projects will be limited

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  • 5 - Budget Revisions and Compliance Issues - Managing Public Grants
    The need for additional Federal funding The transfer of amounts budgeted for indirect costs to absorb increases in direct costs The inclusion of costs that require prior approval in accordance with the governing OMB cost principles circular The transfer of funds allotted for training allowances direct payment to trainees to other categories of expense Extending the period of your grant project with no additional funding no cost extension The Federal awarding agency may not permit any budget changes in a recipient s award that would cause any Federal appropriation to be used for purposes other than those consistent with the original purpose of the authorization and appropriation under which the award was funded The Federal awarding agency may also restrict the transfer of funds among direct cost categories or programs functions and activities for awards If you have a surplus of funds but have applied for continuation funding you do not have to submit notification You must communicate with your Federal awarding agency to request changes to the budget When requesting approval for budget revisions you must use the budget forms that were included in the application unless the Federal awarding agency indicates a letter of request is sufficient Generally the Federal awarding agency will review your request and provide notification of approved changes within thirty calendar days or they will notify you in writing of a date when a decision can be expected Good communication will help you reach an agreement about project changes You need Adobe Flash Player to view some content on this site This sample request process can help you with your budget revisions This request process was used by a grant program in the Office of Community Services an office within HHS s Administration for Children and Families Ensure that all reporting requirements are up to date Prepare a letter request Briefly describe the modification request Explain the reason for the modification Print on your official letterhead Include your grant number and name of your organization and any other relevant identifying information that your funding agency uses to track grants Include the signature of your Authorized Official Complete the SF 424A Budget Information Form Prepare your revised budget clearly showing the approved budget and indicating the requested changes Prepare a modified budget narrative following your revised budget table and explaining each item in the budget Submit these documents to your program officer or your grants management officer specialist as instructed by the awarding office The Federal awarding agency has discretion over noncompliance remedies If a recipient materially fails to comply with the terms and conditions of an award whether stated in a Federal statute regulation assurance application or notice of award the Federal awarding agency may in addition to imposing special conditions take one or more of the following actions as appropriate in the circumstances Temporarily withhold cash payments pending correction of the deficiency by the recipient or more severe enforcement action by the Federal awarding agency Disallow deny both use of funds and any

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  • 6 - Continuation Funding and Grant Closeout - Managing Public Grants
    of the award within ninety days after the budget period and refunding unobligated cash This chapter will give you a brief overview of the responsibilities of your organization during the closeout process and the responsibilities and adjustments of your Federal award agency You have ninety days to submit all required reports Upon completion of your project you must submit all required financial performance and equipment reports to your grants management officer within ninety calendar days of completion of the award Prior to the end of the project period you may request an extension of that time period from the Federal funding agency if needed However unless an extension is authorized you must liquidate all obligations incurred under the award within ninety calendar days of the budget period or the date of completion You must also promptly refund any balances of unobligated cash that the Federal awarding agency has advanced or paid and that is not authorized to be retained by the recipient for use in other projects OMB Circular A 129 governs unreturned amounts that become delinquent debts Upon award completion and closeout equipment records must be maintained but report only equipment valued at over 5 000 The Federal awarding agency will make prompt payments for allowable reimbursable costs under the award being closed out When authorized by the terms and conditions of the award the Federal awarding agency will make any upward or downward adjustments to the Federal share of costs after closeout reports are received In the event that a final audit has not been performed prior to the closeout of an award the Federal awarding agency will retain the right to recover an appropriate amount of funds after fully considering the recommendations on disallowed costs resulting from the final audit The Federal government retains certain rights following

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  • Summary - Managing Public Grants
    future undertakings By now you should be able to achieve proposed program goals receive and disburse Federal funds comply with reporting requirements and write continuation applications Thank you for taking the time to learn about managing public grants Here are some key points for successful grants management Develop a checklist of the Federal awarding agency s requirements and follow it exactly Spend the grant funds exactly as specified by the terms of the grant agreement Regularly communicate with project staff program officers and grants management officers If any deviation from agreement terms is necessary request prior approval from the funding agency Submit performance and financial reports on time and as required by your agreement Maintain good record keeping systems in preparation for program audits Monitor programs and services ensuring alignment with overall project objectives Exercise due diligence and fiscal responsibility when carrying out the tasks supported by the grant Use the resources below to help you with the grant management process Government Funding Grants gov provides a comprehensive listing of Federal grant funds that are available through all departments of the Federal government Departments of the Federal Government Department of Agriculture USDA www usda gov Department of Commerce DOC www

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  • Developing a Plan for Outcome Measurement
    and how Formulaic straightforward outcome statements can help you develop your outcomes When crafting an outcome statement consider the details of the initiative you are providing the recipient of that service or program and the intended impact of that service on your target recipients For instance a youth serving nonprofit might identify the following outcome statements in relation to their afterschool programming Increased school engagement for participating students Reduced high risk behavior for participating students Increased high school graduation rates for participating students Outcome chains document correlative relationships Outcome chains can help organize your thinking about what you hope to achieve They require you to put your program theory to work and articulate how your activities will bring about the impacts in the organizations with whom you are working Outcome chains create a logical progression of the short term intermediate and long term outcomes that lead to your goals Consider the example of a large nonprofit that provides training to smaller nonprofit organizations The provision of training can create the following chain linking reactions learning behavior and results Not all organizations can and will measure all the different outcomes noted in an outcome chain Consider the example of the outcome chain above Your organization may not have the tools and resources to evaluate outcomes as they relate to reaction learning behavior and results If your circumstances do not allow you to evaluate all areas focus on the earlier outcomes noted in the outcome chain There is no point in measuring for results if you cannot point to the series of outcomes that impacted those results Develop realistic informed outcomes When crafting outcomes consider the following Are the outcomes related to the core business of your organization or program Is it within your control to influence these outcomes Are your outcomes realistic and attainable Are your outcomes achievable within funding and reporting periods Are your outcomes written as change statements will things increase decrease or stay the same Have you moved beyond client satisfaction in your outcomes Is there a logical sequence among your short term intermediate and long term outcomes Are there any big leaps in your outcomes i e gaps in the progression of impacts CHAPTER 3 Logic Models and Outcome Measurement An organization should have a well developed logic model in place before they finalize a comprehensive outcome measurement plan A logic model maps out an overview of an organization s tools and resources the services they provide and the intended impacts of these services A basic logic model documents inputs or resources activities outputs and short term intermediate and long term outcomes Inputs or resources are the assets that an organization is prepared to invest to support or implement a program including things like money staff and equipment Activities capture the methodologies an organization plans to use in order to implement a project while outputs describe activities in more finite numerical terms such as the units of service provided Lastly outcomes capture the changes benefits and overall

    Original URL path: http://www.strengtheningnonprofits.org/resources/e-learning/online/outcomemeasurement/Print.aspx (2016-02-12)
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  • Interactivites
    unfamiliar or if an activity is really tough to get through click the chapter title on the tabs above for additional instruction Overview None Getting Started Analyze your staffing needs Analyze your staffing needs Download this checklist for information prior to contracting with outside help Text version of audio here Understanding Outcomes Use if then statements to identify outcomes Use if then statements to identify outcomes Text version of audio

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  • Overview - Developing a Plan for Outcome Measurement
    we will be discussing outcome measurement as a means of exploring the impacts or results of a program or initiative An outcome is a measurable and observable change in individuals groups organizations systems or communities Outcome measurement is a systematic way to assess the extent to which a program has achieved its intended results The main questions addressed in outcome measurement are What has changed in the lives of individuals families organizations or the community as a result of this program Has this program made a difference How are the lives of program participants better as a result of the program By the end of this lesson you will be able to understand how to identify measurable outcomes and outcome chains develop a logic model and identify performance indicators and performance targets to support the outcome measurement process Outcomes communicate value Outcomes are the reason nonprofit organizations strive to deliver programs and build their capacity Most importantly however proper evaluation techniques provide your organization with proof of their value to existing funders potential funders and the larger community Whether this value is communicated in dollars or the number of individuals served quantifiable performance measures are becoming important in the increasingly

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