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  • 5 - Capture the Concept - Value-Driven Donor Development
    Now it is time to organize all of that work into an easy to understand document It s time to create a concept paper Concept papers communicate important points at a glance To do this successfully concept papers use a limited amount of text use a lot of graphics and bold main points Be careful not to get too detailed Focus on the value you bring and the outcomes you ll achieve You want to pique their interest so they ll ask How Be prepared to tell them Concept papers easily communicate your value add When you hand out a concept paper to a room recipients should immediately understand who you are what you do and why that should be of interest to them The most important points to communicate in a concept paper are the outcomes you will achieve and the value those outcomes will add to a funder s mission Concept papers should entice a potential funder to want to know more Communicate main points simply while using an assortment of visual aids Concept papers are skimmed not read Someone should be able to interpret the main points of this document while you speak to them A successful

    Original URL path: http://www.strengtheningnonprofits.org/resources/e-learning/online/vddd/default.aspx?chp=5 (2016-02-12)
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  • Summary - Value-Driven Donor Development
    Understand Your Value Chapter 5 Capture the Concept Summary Summary You need Adobe Flash Player to view some content on this site Audio Transcript Reframing fundraising efforts around the skills of value driven donor development helps both nonprofits and foundations to easily identify strategic service relationships Value Driven Donor Development focuses on aligning what funders want with what nonprofits can offer When nonprofits know the goals of a funder how

    Original URL path: http://www.strengtheningnonprofits.org/resources/e-learning/online/vddd/default.aspx?chp=6 (2016-02-12)
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  • Planning For, Securing, and Documenting In-Kind Donations
    than a standard newsletter or email campaign Developing relationships is essential to building a network of donors Your network can include friends business owners co workers or community members Having a wide variety of people in your network can expand the different types of in kind donations Building and establishing strong relationships with a variety of people in your network can help you identify who are the right people to work with when the time comes to make a request for a donation When a relationship has been built and common ground established asking for a donation will be much easier It is much easier to ask for a donation when you know who you are asking The process for securing an in kind donation is the same as the process used for securing monetary donations Develop positive relationships with local businesses and people These relationships are integral to securing a donation Do your research to determine your target audience This is typically made up of the people who care about you and your mission but might also be an organization or individual looking to get rid of unwanted items Be prepared Have an introduction to your organization ready to go and know what you are asking for before the meeting begins This is your stump speech to get people interested Ask It s tough but you have to do it Be flexible and gracious If someone says your mission does not match their goals work with them to find a common ground It is much easier to ask for a donation when the person you are asking knows you and shares the values and mission of your organization Additional information also increases donors interest and support as they learn of the problems they can solve through in kind donations When you target the right people it is much easier to develop the relationship into donations Many use the ABC ability belief contact approach for identifying prospects The actual order of importance is C B A First utilize your existing contacts to determine if there are any prospects Expand to the next level in your network perhaps you have something in common with these people maybe you both know another donor or maybe the prospect knows someone in your organization socially or professionally Many prospects believe in your cause and a big part of that is being able to see how a gift might affect them their community or those they care about Consider how you can bring your cause closer to the prospect s personal experience In terms of ability keep in mind that many organizations groups or individuals may not be able to provide a large quantity of items but rather many can utilize their abilities to donate time to your organization Asking may be one of the most difficult things you can do but it is also the most important The first step to asking for donations is creating a stump speech which is how you will get your foot in the door This includes introducing the organization laying out the problem to be solved and possible solutions This should be done by individuals who have a passion for the situation with rational and logical communication Individuals who take on this task should be consistent in their approach and follow the guidelines set forth by the organization The approach to solicitation can be quite varied even though everyone has the same stump speech to work from First each person should have an engaging opening to establish common ground They should use open ended questions to discuss the potential donor s interest in the organization The person asking for donations should always remain faithful to him herself and the organization using the skills they feel most comfortable with CHAPTER 3 Documenting In Kind Donations for Yourself Your Donors and The IRS Many organizations forget to include the replacement value of the in kind donations they receive in their expense projections This means they may find themselves in a tough spot if donations reduce and they are not prepared to cover the additional expense Estimating the value of donations can be done in a variety of ways including asking the donor obtaining the current market value or utilizing survey documents to identify the average cost of a service or skill In addition to identifying the current value of the in kind donation organizations must systematically apply the depreciation expense of these items to their budget every year These steps are essential to accurately reporting your budget internally to your board members your donors and the Internal Revenue Service You must keep in kind donations in your budget In kind donations may become items that you need to budget for when they are no longer provided in kind For example imagine that an organization receives free office space from a board member early on in their existence but then the board member is no longer able to afford the costly donation Office space is one of the most costly budget items and if the organization did not have in kind donations noted in their budget they may not be prepared for the large budget jump required If the organization had been documenting the in kind donation they would be aware of the market value of that donation and the impact that losing the donation would have on their budget Additionally disclosing this information to funders would have helped to reveal the full budget picture There are several steps when documenting the value of in kind donations This includes first estimating the value of what was received There are many ways to go about doing this and many places that this information needs to be documented The value of the donation also needs to be assessed for depreciation or loss of value to accurately budget each year Finally the accuracy of documenting in kind donations will result in more accurate reporting for the IRS There are three places where the value

    Original URL path: http://www.strengtheningnonprofits.org/resources/e-learning/online/inkinddonations/Print.aspx (2016-02-12)
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  • Interactivites
    the lesson Click the icons to see material from each chapter come alive If something seems unfamiliar or if an activity is really tough to get through click the chapter title on the tabs above for additional instruction Overview None Identifying In Kind Donations Desired and Needed Creating A Wish List Creating A Wish List Text version of audio here Securing In Kind Donations is Based on Relationship Building Tips

    Original URL path: http://www.strengtheningnonprofits.org/resources/e-learning/online/inkinddonations/Interactivities.aspx?chp=99 (2016-02-12)
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  • Interactivites
    the overview and pause at any time by pressing the Pause button on the bottom left of the player The buttons at the bottom right of the player allow you to control the volume and shift the video to full screen On Screen Text Below the player you will find on screen text This includes the detailed information you will need to know in order to meet learning objectives for

    Original URL path: http://www.strengtheningnonprofits.org/resources/e-learning/online/inkinddonations/Help.aspx?chp=99 (2016-02-12)
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  • Overview - Planning For, Securing, and Documenting In-Kind Donations
    for the donation accurate reporting and thanking people for giving This lesson will explore these steps and will also provide useful tips to enhance your comfort level going through the process In kind donations are given in goods or services rather than money Donations of goods and services can be extremely valuable to nonprofit organizations For some organizations it is central to the mission of the organization to secure and use donated items and services and the organization s positive impact depends on those donated services Although these are often the most welcome kind of donations organizations should properly advertise their needs target the most likely donors and document all items properly to ensure they receive the items they need the most Some examples of in kind donations include Goods Books Office equipment Office furniture Food refreshments Games or toys Clothes Car van Services Bookkeeping Copying printing Meeting office space Professional services accounting lawyer etc Mentoring tutoring Editing publishing support Event planning Space Classroom Office Storage Advertising space There are a number of benefits for giving in kind donations for donors Many donors are drawn to giving in kind donations rather than money Some people might be looking to increase

    Original URL path: http://www.strengtheningnonprofits.org/resources/e-learning/online/inkinddonations/default.aspx?chp=0 (2016-02-12)
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  • 1 - Identifying In-Kind Donations Desired and Needed - Planning For, Securing, and Documenting In-Kind Donations
    desired or needed items First you can use the wish list to reach out to local businesses and volunteers making each request intentional and specific Use the list to advertise those needs through a newsletter website or by posting a sign at your drop off center As you receive items check them off so that your supporters can see your progress You don t need to accept every in kind donation that is offered as you might create a negative relationship if you accept a product or service that you cannot use If it is a donation that you can t use or do not have the capacity to manage gracefully decline the offer Some donations though well intentioned have hidden costs and pose issues such as requiring time money and personnel to process The wish list allows you and the donor to see what is needed and reduces your chances of receiving a donation that you will not use Creating A Wish List You need Adobe Flash Player to view some content on this site It is important to consider both large and small organizations as potential in kind donors While it is important to consider the large nation wide companies based in your city or town as potential in kind donors before jumping into what can be a long process with large businesses think of the small business owners in your community as well Build relationships with small business owners and solicit them first Don t be discouraged by rejections the more organizations you contact the more people will get to hear your story When you do decide to ask a large corporation do your research first Many corporations have a giving philosophy and process Make sure your mission aligns with theirs before you approach them Both large

    Original URL path: http://www.strengtheningnonprofits.org/resources/e-learning/online/inkinddonations/default.aspx?chp=1 (2016-02-12)
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  • 2 - Securing In-Kind Donations is Based on Relationship Building - Planning For, Securing, and Documenting In-Kind Donations
    securing monetary donations Develop positive relationships with local businesses and people These relationships are integral to securing a donation Do your research to determine your target audience This is typically made up of the people who care about you and your mission but might also be an organization or individual looking to get rid of unwanted items Be prepared Have an introduction to your organization ready to go and know what you are asking for before the meeting begins This is your stump speech to get people interested Ask It s tough but you have to do it Be flexible and gracious If someone says your mission does not match their goals work with them to find a common ground It is much easier to ask for a donation when the person you are asking knows you and shares the values and mission of your organization Additional information also increases donors interest and support as they learn of the problems they can solve through in kind donations When you target the right people it is much easier to develop the relationship into donations Many use the ABC ability belief contact approach for identifying prospects The actual order of importance is C B A First utilize your existing contacts to determine if there are any prospects Expand to the next level in your network perhaps you have something in common with these people maybe you both know another donor or maybe the prospect knows someone in your organization socially or professionally Many prospects believe in your cause and a big part of that is being able to see how a gift might affect them their community or those they care about Consider how you can bring your cause closer to the prospect s personal experience In terms of ability keep in

    Original URL path: http://www.strengtheningnonprofits.org/resources/e-learning/online/inkinddonations/default.aspx?chp=2 (2016-02-12)
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