archive-org.com » ORG » S » SWRC.ORG

Total: 349

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Stephanie Eisenbise, Watershed Restoration Coordinator
    Leaf Pack Network Events Support Support Home Donate Now Planned Giving Event Calendar Volunteer The Water s Edge Lecture Series Contact Us News What s New News Releases Media Coverage SAFE Water Award Newsletters Annual Reports Search Watershed Restoration Stephanie Eisenbise Watershed Restoration Coordinator 970 Spencer Road Avondale PA 19311 610 268 2153 ext 311 610 268 0490 Fax Email Education Previous Positions Education M S in Forest Resources 2014 Penn State University State College Pa B A in Environmental Studies 2003 University of Colorado Boulder Co Previous Positions May 2013 2014 Watershed Restoration Manager Chesapeake Bay Foundation Harrisburg PA 2010 2013 Restoration Specialist Chesapeake Bay Foundation Harrisburg PA 2006 2010 Director of Land Protection and Stewardship Central Pennsylvania Conservancy Harrisburg PA 2009 2010 Project Manager The Manada Conservancy PA 2006 Field Science Instructor Wild Bear Center for Nature Discovery Boulder CO 2005 Field Science Instructor Olympic Park Institute Olympic National Park WA 2004 Field Science Instructor Blue Ridge Outdoor Education School Toccoa GA 2002 Biological Field Ecologist University of Colorado Co and Cloud Forest School Monteverde Costa Rica Learn More Restoration Home Search our site Research Critical Zone Observatory Schuylkill River Project Reforestation Project Long Term Research Stream Watch

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/about/eisenbise.shtm (2016-04-27)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Lamonte Garber, Watershed Restoration Coordinator
    work including outreach fundraising media project coordination and on farm assistance Education Previous Positions Professional Affiliations Community Involvement Media Education B S Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 1988 The Pennsylvania State University Goshen College Goshen IN Previous Positions 2008 2014 Pennsylvania Agriculture Program Manager Chesapeake Bay Foundation CBF Harrisburg PA 2003 2007 Private Consultant Lancaster PA Worked with CBF PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture Buy Fresh Buy Local and Blue Ribbon Commission on Lancaster County Agriculture 2000 2002 Interim Executive Director and Director of Southeast PA Programs PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture Millheim PA 1999 2000 Project Associate Environmental Quality Initiatives Inc State College PA 1988 1998 PA Agricultural Specialist Chesapeake Bay Foundation Harrisburg PA Professional Affiliations Member Society for Ecological Restoration Member Pennsylvania Farmers Union Lifetime Member Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture Community Involvement Past and Present Member Partners Council Penn State Center for Integrated Nutrient Solutions Member Pennsylvania Nutrient Management Advisory Board Director LIVE Green Lancaster Founding Director and Secretary Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture Chair PA Chesapeake Bay Advisory Committee Member Blue Ribbon Commission for Lancaster County Agriculture Vice President Lancaster Heritage and Environment Alliance Secretary Lancaster Cooperative School Director West Branch Bioregional Project Coordinator Lancaster County Stream Team Member Community Mennonite Church of Lancaster Selected Media Coverage Luciew J 2013 January 6 The Old Sect and the Sea The Amish and the Chesapeake Bay Sunday Patriot News pp 1A 10 12A Luciew J 2013 March April The Amish and the Bay Central PA Magazine Vol 7 No 2 50 55 Pirro J F 2012 November To Buffer or Not to Buffer Growing Vol 10 No 11 B10 B13 B20 21 Rutter J 2012 October 28 Stream Quality Better But Not Clean Enough Intelligencer Journal pp B1 B2 Campbell A Natural Light Films 2012 August Amish Farmer

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/about/lamontegarber.shtm (2016-04-27)
    Open archived version from archive

  • LEED® Platinum Certified Moorhead Environmental Complex
    U S Green Building Council USGBC If you would like to know more about the intent and requirements for the points in each scoring category please visit USGBC s web page for new construction credits Sustainable Sites 10 Points Awarded This category discourages development on previously undeveloped land seeks to minimize a building s impact on ecosystems and waterways encourages regionally appropriate landscaping rewards smart transportation choices controls stormwater runoff and promotes the reduction of erosion light pollution heat island effect and contruction related pollution Show Points Awarded Points were awarded for Site selection 1 1 Alternative transportation bicycle storage and changing rooms 1 1 Alternative transportation low emitting and fuel efficient vehicles 1 1 Alternative transportation parking capacity 1 1 Site development protect or restore habitat 1 1 Stormwater design quantity control 1 1 Stormwater design quality control 1 1 Heat island effect non roof 1 1 Heat island effect roof 1 1 Light pollution reduction 1 1 Hide Details Water Efficiency 5 Points Awarded This category encourages smarter use of water Water reduction is typically achieved through more efficient appliances fixtures and fittings inside and water conscious landscaping outside Show Points Awarded Points were awarded for Water efficient landscaping reduced by 50 1 1 Water efficient landscaping no potable water used or no irrigation 1 1 Innovative wastewater techniques 1 1 Water use reductions 20 reduction 1 1 Water use reductions 30 reduction 1 1 Hide Details Energy Atmosphere 15 Points Awarded This category encourages a wide variety of energy wise strategies energy use monitoring efficient design and construction efficient appliances systems and lighting the use of renewable and clean sources of energy generated on site or off site and other innovative measures Show Points Awarded Points were awarded for Optimized energy performance 10 10 On site renewable energy 3 3 Enhanced refrigerant management 1 1 Green power 1 1 Hide Details Material Resources 6 Points Awarded This category encourages the selection of sustainably grown harvested produced and transported products and materials It promotes waste reduction as well as reuse and recycling and it particularly rewards the reduction of waste at a product s source Show Points Awarded Points were awarded for Construction waste management divert 50 from disposal 1 1 Construction waste management divert 75 from disposal 1 1 Materials reuse 5 1 1 Recycled content 10 post consumer 1 2 pre consumer 1 1 Regional materials 10 extracted processed and manufactured regionally 1 1 Regional materials 20 extracted processed and manufactured regionally 1 1 Hide Details Indoor Environmental Quality 12 Points Awarded This category promotes strategies that improve indoor air as well as those that provide access to natural daylight and views and those that improve acoustics Show Points Awarded Points were awarded for Construction Indoor Air Quality management plan during construction 1 1 Construction Indoor Air Quality management plan before occupancy 1 1 Low emitting materials adhesives and sealants 1 1 Low emitting materials paints and coatings 1 1 Low emitting materials carpet systems 1

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/mec/leed.shtm (2016-04-27)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Moorhead Environmental Complex Achieves LEED® Platinum
    as the Moorhead Environmental Complex is a fundamental driving force in the green building movement Stroud Water Research Center has displayed an unwavering commitment to create facilities that reflect the highest possible environmental responsiveness and to use them as an educational resource for all said Sandy Wiggins owner s representative for the Center and past chairman of the U S Green Building Council The project itself is a living laboratory for Stroud s study of water and the environment This is consistent with everything I ve come to know about the Center s work in the world As an organization they embody everything that the LEED Platinum certification represents and I look forward to their ongoing contribution to the body of knowledge that is transforming the built environment LEED certification of the Moorhead Environmental Complex was based on a number of green design and construction features that positively impact the project itself and the broader community Some of the green features on site include stormwater management using natural landscaping with porous surfaces a green roof a rooftop rainwater capture system and rain gardens with native vegetation sustainable water use and treatment via water efficient fixtures a rooftop rainwater capture system feeding water efficient toilets a wetland wastewater treatment system and several composting toilets overall energy efficiency via a geothermal system radiant heating natural ventilation solar power high efficiency windows sunshades soy based spray foam insulation and recycled slag mineral wool interior insulation and recycled and locally sourced materials indoor environmental quality via low emitting materials efficient and task specific lighting maximum use of natural ventilation and light Especially notable is the rainwater capture system which is used to flush toilets and provide a water source for the Center s chemistry labs It will also be assessed for use as a source of potable water Muscoe Martin the project s architect and design team leader noted that the Center s commitment to getting the water right was a major impetus for many of the design solutions We felt the Center deserved a building and site design that reflected its world class research Our team worked with Center staff and board members to develop a design that demonstrates how architecture can be integrated into the landscape to be environmentally sensitive and inspiring Tom Nason of Nason Construction Inc said We re excited to be a part of the team that worked on the Moorhead Environmental Complex It s an honor to work with an organization like Stroud Water Research Center The design and engineering team included M2 Architecture Meliora Environmental Design Andropogon Associates Bruce E Brooks Associates Ann Rothmann Structural Engineering LLC Biohabitats and David Nelson Associates LLC Nason Construction Inc was the general contractor and Consilience LLC was the owner s representative In addition educational opportunities have been maximized using educational and interpretive signage that appears on or near innovative building and landscaping solutions Education Director Susan Gill Ph D said With two new classrooms educational signage and the green features

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/press/2013/20130422_leedplatinum.shtm (2016-04-27)
    Open archived version from archive

  • LEED® Sustainable Sites: Green Roof, Rain Gardens & Porous Pavers
    Award Newsletters Annual Reports Search Moorhead Environmental Complex LEED Certification Water Efficiency Sustainable Site Stormwater Design for Quantity Quality Control The Moorhead Environmental Complex uses natural landscaping to increase infiltration and reduce runoff and related non point source pollution Features include a green roof rain gardens and porous pavers Click for details about our green roof Hide Details Click for details about our rain gardens and porous pavers Hide Details DO Try This At Home How can I manage stormwater on my property Identify low lying poorly draining or erosion prone areas and turn them into rain gardens Install rain barrels to collect rainwater and avoid runoff Read more about rain barrels Minimize your pavement Where pavement is necessary consider the wide variety of permeable paving options Rain garden templates are available The Low Impact Development Center offers rain garden templates for sunny and shady areas in the mountain Piedmont and coastal region of the mid Atlantic states Find your region on the map and then select a plan for sun or shade Check out this video for step by step instructions for installing a rain garden on your property Find Out More Introduction Campus History Map LEED Platinum Certification

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/mec/sustainable_sites.shtm (2016-04-27)
    Open archived version from archive

  • LEED® Water Efficiency: Innovative Wastewaster Techniques
    it work Other than the obvious ingredient composting humanure requires good drainage a constant flow of air a high carbon bulking material like bark mulch or sawdust and time Adding redworms can help reduce maintenance and speed up the process What will we do with the finished compost If the process works as planned more than 90 of the input material will be converted to water and carbon dioxide leaving us with a small amount of dry material similar to topsoil It can be removed as necessary by a licensed handler Sources http www clivusmultrum com Click for details about our composting toilets Hide Details Wetland Wastewater Treatment A constructed wetland Can this really work We know that natural wetlands are excellent filters removing pollutants and nutrients as water flows through them toward lakes rivers and oceans Scientists and engineers have sought to replicate many of these natural processes in engineered wetlands As of 2004 there were more than 1 000 constructed wetlands in operation in the U S and more than 5 000 operating in Europe When planned constructed and maintained properly they have many benefits including water reuse and wildlife habitat A newly planted constructed wetland top and the same site two years later How efficient are these systems at removing heavy metals In an EPA study conducted in 2003 on a four year old wetland treatment system with 48 hour retention time the following removal rates were achieved Copper and mercury greater than 80 removal Lead 83 removal Zinc 60 removal Nickel generally unaffected What about nutrient removal The same study showed that nitrates were removed completely from the water column as soon as it entered the wetland system and that the anaerobic conditions of the wetland reduced manganese and iron to soluble forms and increased dissolved

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/mec/water_efficiency.shtm (2016-04-27)
    Open archived version from archive

  • LEED® Energy & Atmosphere: Solar Panels, Green Power, Geothermal Heating & Cooling, Radiant Heat
    the older one Of course the geothermal system doesn t just heat our building it also taps the constant temperature of the earth to cool us in the warmer months 100 of the heathing and cooling needs of the Moorhead Environmental Complex are supplied by its geothermal systems The result MUCH lower utility bills and a much smaller carbon footprint compared to heating with fossil fuels Which leaves us feeling good about our campus and frees up resources for our mission to advance knowledge and stewardship of fresh water Sources A History of Geothermal Energy in the United States Click for details about our geothermal system Hide Details Radiant Floor Heating Radiant floor heating is one of the most efficient forms of heating available today Our radiant floor system is supplied by hot water supplied from a geothermal heat pump Click for details about our wetland wastewater treatment system Hide Details The DIY television channels may make radiant underfloor heating seem like a groundbreaking new idea But did you know it actually dates back to the Stone Age Archaeological evidence points to the use of underfloor heating in some areas of Asia and the Aleutian islands possibly as far back as 5 000 BC Trenches were dug underneath the floors of subterranean houses to circulate warmed air from fires Floor stones covering the trenches then transferred the heat into the living spaces Better known is the widespread use of hypocausts for heating public baths by the Greeks and Romans around 500 BC Hypocaust in a Roman bath house Photo by Daniel Zvi While Frank Lloyd Wright favored it as early as 1905 radiant heating was popularized in this country during the post World War II housing boom Thousands of homes in the iconic suburb of Levittown NY were built with

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/mec/energy.shtm (2016-04-27)
    Open archived version from archive

  •  Moorhead Environmental Complex: Stroud Bench
    What s New News Releases Media Coverage SAFE Water Award Newsletters Annual Reports Search Moorhead Environmental Complex View Stroud bench sign Sustainable Materials Origins of the Stroud Bench The wood in the Stroud Bench comes from six continents and in keeping with the sustainable materials criterion for LEED certification was either sustainably harvested or reclaimed The bench was built with this selection of international woods to represent the global reach of the Center s science and education programs Some of recent research locations are marked on the map below In the Stroud Bench North America is represented by American Chestnut Central South America by River Salvaged Genuine Mahogany Europe by Spessart oak Africa is represented by Bubinga Asia by Plantation East Indian Rosewood and Australia by Tasmanian Blackwood Sources The Wood Database Find Out More Introduction Campus History Map LEED Platinum Certification Stormwater Management Landscaping Rain Garden Plants Green Roof Green Roof Plants Waste Treatment Constructed Wetlands Wetland Plants Composting Toilets Heating Cooling Geothermal System Radiant Heat Sustainable Materials Stroud Bench View Educational Signage The Team Design Engineering M2 Architecture Meliora Environmental Design Andropogon Associates Bruce E Brooks Associates Ann Rothmann Structural Engineering LLC Biohabitats David Nelson Associates LLC Construction

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/mec/bench.shtm (2016-04-27)
    Open archived version from archive



  •