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  • Financials
    The Water s Edge Lecture Series Contact Us News What s New News Releases Media Coverage SAFE Water Award Newsletters Annual Reports Search About the Center Financials Form 990 2013 Form 990 2012 Form 990 2011 Form 990 2010 Form 990 Audited Financials 2013 Audited Financials 2012 Audited Financials 2011 Audited Financials 2010 Audited Financials Quick Links What s New Events Research Education Watershed Restoration Moorhead Environmental Complex Support Contact

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/about/financials/ (2016-04-27)
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  • Wireless Sensor Networks for Watershed Assessment
    wireless commercial datalogger system Ease of use The Arduino electronics prototyping platform was initially designed for artists designers hobbyists and anyone interested in creating interactive objects or environments As such the Arduino family of electronics hardware is easy to snap together and program yet it is also capable of nearly any task we might imagine Support The large user community provides support as well as constant innovation and development of new hardware and applications Reliability Self healing mesh wireless networks route the radio signal from the nodes to the base station using the most efficient route Each node also has a removable memory card to store a backup of the sensor data Compatibility Commercial dataloggers can join an Arduino mesh network by simply connecting an Xbee radio module to the logger so it can transmit the data that it usually only stores on its internal memory Our Preliminary Results We believe that using open source electronics hardware for watershed instrumentation will transform our ability to deploy sensors field instruments and other electronic eyes and ears to unprecedented levels High quality commercial sensors are relatively inexpensive and widely available Easy customization of the Arduino node interface hardware and software means virtually any sensor can be used As we finalize our electrical designs and Arduino programming code we will be sharing all of the documentation for our loggers and other devices so anyone can replicate and implement their own versions of our instrumentation For more information visit EnviroDIY org our do it yourself environmental science and monitoring website Building the Networks Datalogger nodes consist of a microprocessor board paired with a radio module all mounted in a weatherproof enclosure along with a solar panel and rechargeable battery The nodes conserve battery power by sleeping most of the time then waking periodically to

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/research/projects/czo/arduino.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • Stroud Water Research Center: Schuylkill River Project
    watersheds that together represent the Philadelphia metropolitan area For example forests have regrown to cover about 41 of the basin and now represent important areas for recreation wildlife and potentially silviculture Agriculture still occupies 40 of the acreage while developed lands represent about 13 Finally surface and groundwater resources in the Basin continues to provide drinking water for more than 3 million people David Rebuck uses a Hess sampler to collect benthic bottom dwelling macroinvertebrates Macroinvertebrates as Indicators of Water Quality This study uses benthic i e bottom dwelling macroinvertebrates such as insects worms and crayfish that live in the River and its tributaries to assess current water and habitat quality Benthic macroinvertebrates were chosen as the focus of this monitoring program because they are the most common group of aquatic organisms in water quality assessment programs Hellawell 1986 they have provided water quality assessment programs with valuable insight for more than 100 years Cairns and Pratt 1993 and they are now integral in watershed education and outreach programs Aquatic insects are commonly included in biological monitoring programs that assess water quality in streams and rivers for a number of reasons Weber 1973 Hawkes 1979 Hellawell 1986 Most reaches of a given stream or river ecosystem support relatively diverse 100 200 species aquatic insect assemblages that include species from several different groups of insects e g Ephemeroptera mayflies Trichoptera caddisflies Coleoptera beetles Diptera true flies Because each species potentially has different tolerances of environmental change and stress this diversity can result in hundreds of independent environmental measures that taken together provide a relatively sensitive measure of environmental change and stress Their limited mobility and relatively long life spans a few months to at least a year make the presence or conspicuous absence of an aquatic insect species at a site

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/research/projects/schuylkill/intro.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • Stroud Water Research Center: Schuylkill River Project
    49 Valley Creek 42 Skippack Creek 24 and East Branch Perkiomen 12 but only 0 6 7 for most other sites and mining operations were 7 9 of land cover for the West Branch Schuylkill and Headwaters Mainstem Schuylkill 1 5 2 5 for Little Schuylkill and Valley Creek and rare or absent for all other basins There are over 250 dams distributed throughout the Schuylkill River basin including in our study streams Poten 1996 These are generally low head dams that create relatively small impoundments but there are three large reservoirs in the basin Green Lane Reservoir on Lower Perkiomen Creek Blue Marsh Reservoir on Tulpehocken Creek Lake Ontelaunee on Maiden Creek Most dams on the study streams were located either on upstream tributaries or 10 km from the actual study reach The Site 12 was 150 m downstream from a low head impoundment and several km downstream of Blue Marsh Reservoir while Site 17 was downstream of several small impoundments Each of these 19 sites integrates the upstream activities within each watershed and represents water quality in the tributaries just before they enter the mainstem Schuylkill River This assessment provides an overall evaluation of efforts to protect mitigate and restore these tributaries and watersheds It also provides important perspective when examining new sites These sites were sampled annually to provide a measure of annual variation in the stream communities and its impact on stream assessments to generate the data needed to assess long term changes in stream conditions and provide simultaneous data to provide perspective when evaluating data from other sites Beginning in 2001 we worked with local watershed associations and other interested parties to identify additional sites 12 31 per year 127 total to provide spatially detailed information in specific watersheds in the southwest 2001 and 2006 upper 2002 northeast 2003 and 2006 northwest 2004 Perkiomen 2005 and 2006 and northwest southwest and northeast 2007 tributaries Sample Collection and Processing Hess sampler Macroinvertebrate samples were collected annually between late March and late April for 12 years 1996 2007 at the 19 Long Term study sites The other 127 sites were sampled only once between late March and late April from 2001 to 2007 Five quantitative samples were collected randomly from a single riffle at each site using a modified Hess sampler 0 088 m 2 sample area 500 µm mesh net During sample collection the substrate was disturbed and dislodged macroinvertebrates were collected in the sampler s net Each stone large gravel to cobble in the sampling area was scrubbed with a brush and then inspected for any remaining attached macroinvertebrates which were then removed by hand Although substrates were generally similar across all samples mostly small to large cobble the quantity of leaves woody debris and sand silt associated with the cobbles varied among sites and years After collection macroinvertebrate samples were preserved in 95 Ethanol transported to the laboratory and split into four or more equal subsamples Subsampling reduced the number of individuals examined from

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/research/projects/schuylkill/methods.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • Stroud Water Research Center: Schuylkill River Project
    study has three long term scientific and education goals To establish baseline data that can be used to describe and evaluate water and habitat quality current and long term in the Schuylkill River basin based on aquatic macroinvertebrates collected from numerous locations distributed throughout the basin To make this assessment available to local education outreach and community groups in order to encourage efforts to assess improve and or protect water quality in these streams and rivers and To provide local college students experience in a long term scientific study collecting and processing scientific data that will be compared to past data and used in future studies It is important to keep in mind that an assessment of current water and habitat quality in the Schuylkill River and its tributaries reflects both past and recent anthropogenic activities Some scars from past anthropogenic activities are no longer evident while others remain although time or mitigation may have concealed them or lessened their impact As a result caution should be applied in the interpretation of monitoring data when only observations of recent anthropogenic activities are available Explore Schuylkill River Project Schuylkill Project Home Introduction Project Goals Sampling Methods Data Interpretation Sampling Sites Entire

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/research/projects/schuylkill/goals.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • Stroud Water Research Center: Schuylkill River Project
    The macroinvertebrate samples are quantitative because the animals are collected from a known area of stream bottom enclosed by the modified Hess sampler This allows the macroinvertebrate counts to be expressed as a density e g number per unit area or individuals per square meter which can be then used to compare across sites and years A large range of macroinvertebrate density was observed in this study from 1000 m 2 to 100 000 per m 2 We used density estimates to identify the 10 most common macroinvertebrates at each site and to note when abundance seemed unusually low or high Density is often extremely low at sites receiving significant Acid Mine Drainage Density can be very high when selected pollution tolerant species increase in abundance in response to pollution with significant organic and nutrient enrichment MAIS Score Rather than relying only on one or a few individual metrics multimetric indices have been developed that integrate various types of information into a single number that can be used to compare streams The Macroinvertebrate Aggregated Index for Streams MAIS was developed by Smith and Voshell 1997 based on benthic macroinvertebrate data from streams in the Mid Atlantic Highlands of Maryland 51 sites Pennsylvania 53 sites Virginia 126 sites and West Virginia 200 sites The MAIS summarizes the values of 10 metrics Ephemeroptera Richness EPT Richness Intolerant Taxa Richness Ephemeroptera EPT 5 Dominant Taxa Simpson Diversity HBI Hilsenhof Biotic Index Scrapers Haptobenthos While the MAIS is relatively new 9 of the 10 individual metrics the exception is Haptobenthos used to calculate a MAIS Score have a long history in aquatic insect ecology and water quality monitoring programs Values for the individual metrics are transformed into a score of 0 1 and 2 and then combined into a MAIS Score MAIS Scores are predicted to decrease in response to a decrease in water habitat quality Streams are classified based on MAIS Scores as follows 13 1 20 classify a site as Good 6 1 13 classify a site as Fair 0 6 classify a site as Poor The difference between Good and Poor sites is dramatic For example EPT Richness the number of mayfly stonefly and caddisfly families might be 11 12 at the highest scoring Good sites but only 1 3 at the Poor sites The abundance of macroinvertebrate species within a community often differs between years This difference is referred to as annual variation and the cumulative affect can be evident in the MAIS Scores Some of this variation may be related to natural phenomena such as droughts or floods some of it may be related to human activities such as an unexpected pollution discharge most of it is often unexplained In the case of water quality monitoring it can have a significant effect on stream classifications For example the MAIS Scores and site classifications presented for Sites 1 19 are the average across eleven years However the figure below illustrates how MAIS Scores for each site varied among years and

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/research/projects/schuylkill/interpretation.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • Stroud Water Research Center: Schuylkill River Project
    Creek 89 Perkiomen Creek Basin Limekiln Creek 143 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Little Cacoosing Creek 50 Northwest Schuylkill Basin Little Manatawny 74 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Little Northkill Creek 56 Northwest Schuylkill Basin Little Schuylkilll River 14 Upper Schuylkill Basin Long Term Sampling Sites Little Valley Creek 21 Southwest Schuylkill Basin Little Valley Creek 24 Southwest Schuylkill Basin Locust Creek 43 Upper Schuylkill Basin Lofty Creek 42 Upper Schuylkill Basin Lower Cacoosing Creek 52 Northwest Schuylkill Basin Lower Mingo Creek 111 Perkiomen Creek Basin Lower Swamp Creek 105 Perkiomen Creek Basin Macoby Creek 95 Perkiomen Creek Basin Maiden Creek 10 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Long Term Sampling Sites Main Schuylkill above Port Carbon 39 Upper Schuylkill Basin Main Schuylkill below Pottsville 38 Upper Schuylkill Basin Mainstem Schuylkill River 15 Upper Schuylkill Basin Long Term Sampling Sites Manatawny at Pine Forge 114 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Manatawny Creek 7 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Long Term Sampling Sites Middle Branch Pickering Creek 31 Southwest Schuylkill Basin Middle Hay Creek 110 Southwest Schuylkill Basin Mill Creek above Dark Water 41 Upper Schuylkill Basin Mill Creek below Dark Water 49 Upper Schuylkill Basin Mill Creek 146 Northwest Schuylkill Basin Mill Creek 69 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Mill Creek 84 Perkiomen Creek Basin Minister Creek 104 Perkiomen Creek Basin Molasses Creek 90 Perkiomen Creek Basin Monacacy Creek 142 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Monacacy Creek at Route 422 144 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Morris Run 82 Perkiomen Creek Basin Moselem Creek 70 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Mud Run 40 Upper Schuylkill Basin Muddy Run 46 Upper Schuylkill Basin North Branch French Creek 28 Southwest Schuylkill Basin North Branch Pickering Creek 32 Southwest Schuylkill Basin North Mill Creek 60 Northwest Schuylkill Basin Northkill Creek 11 Northwest Schuylkill Basin Long Term Sampling Sites Ontelaunee Creek 65 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Owatin Creek 141 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Owl Creek 44 Upper Schuylkill Basin Oysterville Creek 75 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Perkiomen Creek 2 Perkiomen Creek Basin Long Term Sampling Sites Pickering Creek 5 Southwest Schuylkill Basin Long Term Sampling Sites Pigeon Creek at Halteman Road 126 Southwest Schuylkill Basin Pigeon Creek at Laurelwood Road 125 Southwest Schuylkill Basin Pigeon Creek at Old Schuylkill Road 127 Southwest Schuylkill Basin Pine Creek on Maiden 62 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Pine Creek on Manatawny 72 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Pine Creek 30 Southwest Schuylkill Basin Pleasant Spring Creek 83 Perkiomen Creek Basin Plum Creek 53 Northwest Schuylkill Basin Punches Run in Nolde Forest 135 Northwest Schuylkill Basin Rattling Run 36 Upper Schuylkill Basin Ridge Valley Creek 92 Perkiomen Creek Basin Rock Run 124 Southwest Schuylkill Basin Sacony Creek 67 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Schlegel Run 103 Perkiomen Creek Basin Sciota Creek 106 Perkiomen Creek Basin Skippack Creek 3 Perkiomen Creek Basin Long Term Sampling Sites South Branch French Creek 29 Southwest Schuylkill Basin South Mill Creek 59 Northwest Schuylkill Basin Spring Creek 58 Northwest Schuylkill Basin Stony Run 66 Northeast Schuylkill Basin Stony Run at Cromby Road 123 Southwest Schuylkill Basin Stony Run at Pikeland Avenue 122 Southwest Schuylkill Basin Towamenicen Creek 79 Perkiomen Creek Basin

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/research/projects/schuylkill/basins/index.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • Stroud Water Research Center: Schuylkill River Project
    Brener University of Pennsylvania Laura Boyd Oberlin College Frank Butera Temple University Shabina Dalal Penn State University Luke Groff Penn State University Tavleen Gujral West Chester University Sieglinde Mueller Skidmore College Carol Kissa West Chester University Erin Letovsky Alfred University Michelle O Connor University of Maryland Louisa Shakeri Dickinson College Robin Spurlino Summer Interns 2005 Michael Broomall Millersville University Margaret Christie Cedar Crest College Tanya Dapkey West Chester University Erika Farris University of Delaware Buddy Kondikoff Millersville University Stacy Lathrop West Chester University Chelsea Lucas University of Maine William Reese Lock Haven University Drew Sieg Richmond University Holly Wielebinski West Chester University Jennifer L Wolf Sweet Briar College Summer Interns 2004 Deirdre Bowers West Chester University Ashley D Antonio Pennsylvania State University Katie Hill Messiah College William Hohman Gettysburg College Joanna Huxster University of Richmond Angela Jackson University of Maryland Buddy Kondikoff Millersville University Chelsea Lucas University of Maine Eric Lundquist University of Pennsylvania Melissa McGonigle West Chester University Tracee Mosch Dickinson College Stephen Moyer Millersville University Kristian Varsa University of Delaware Arthur L Walker West Chester University Summer Interns 2003 Erin Colbert University of Delaware Kristin Comolli University of Delaware Amber Eck California University of Pennsylvania Heather Eggleston Lycoming College Eryn Jackson Ohio Wesleyan Jennifer Korth Dickinson College Gordon Rose University of Pennsylvania Matt Spaits University of the Sciences Sam Voss Washington College Jenna Wright Western State College Summer Interns 2002 Sara Beatty Alfred University Andrew Byler Millersville University Gareth Davies Middlebury College Michelle DiMeglio Lafayette College Colin Fiske Pomona College Amy MacCausland Arcadia University Mary Rotondi West Chester University Matt Spaits University of the Sciences Alani Taylor Cornell University Mark Zolandz Ursinus College Summer Interns 2001 Amy Brown James Madison University Andrew Byler Millersville University Kelly Fisher Pennsylvania State University Amy Galliera West Chester University Colleen Gaynor West Chester University Nathaniel Hardy Cornell University David Hoppy Philadelphia University Elizabeth Kulpinski Millersville University Katherine Stroud Tulane College Andrew Tucker Messiah College Mark Zolandz Ursinus College Summer Interns 2000 Carrie L Burkholder Millersville University Kelly Fisher Pennsylvania State University Christi J Hadden Messiah College Nathaniel Hardy Cornell University Deirdre F Huzzard Green Mountain College Thomas K O Donnell West Chester University Robert Smith Millersville University Summer Interns 1999 Michael S Hubbs West Chester University Lisa A Johnson Millersville University Thomas K O Donnell West Chester University Aura Thompson West Chester University Elena Tkacz University of Arizona Elizabeth Vogle Hobart William Smith Colleges Sara Wolf Millersville University Summer Interns 1998 Michael Dadd West Chester University Kevin Fryberger Green Mountain College Sean Gorby University of Delaware Denise Henry Providence College Sara Wolf Millersville University Summer Interns 1997 Diane Macheski West Chester University David Montgomery Millersville University Claire Murray Pennsylvania State University Megan Ritche Eastern College Jenny Shill Bucknell University Susan Still University of North Carolina Susan Wychowanec Millersville University Summer Interns 1996 Mara Devlin Lycoming College Susan Hewitt West Chester University Jenny Rakus Kutztown University Megan Ritche Eastern College Jenny Shill Bucknell University Government and Private Organizations Albany Township Allegheny Creek Watershed

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/research/projects/schuylkill/contributors.shtm (2016-04-27)
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