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  • Outreach Campaign Reaches Distant Watersheds and New Communities
    Restored stream ecosystems process both natural substances and unwanted pollutants more effectively than degraded waterways Healthy streams and their inhabitants break down assimilate and eliminate many water contaminants around the clock seven days a week A comprehensive review of scientific literature pertaining to forested stream buffers recently published by Director Bern Sweeney Ph D and Research Scientist Emeritus Denis Newbold Ph D found that streams typically need buffers at least 100 feet wide on each side to protect and restore the stream ecosystem and its services The study helps address a long standing debate regarding buffer width and gives land managers new insights for protecting their own land and water Using Nature as a Model Matt Ehrhart Watershed Restoration Director at Stroud feels that many communities are ready for watershed protection techniques that use nature as the model Natural resources are resilient with tremendous capacity for regeneration and renewal Ehrhart said But we need to create the conditions in which natural processes can flourish Technology alone is not enough Stroud and USDA NRCS shared soil and stream science with 225 farmers in New Holland Pa Photo Lamonte Garber Based on this model Stroud s Watershed Restoration Program helps landowners reduce pollution from the land and at the same time restore the streams ability to process pollution Planting and caring for new streamside forests is combined and integrated with other improvements with an overall objective of whole farm conservation Reaching Distant Watersheds and New Communities We rely on many partners to deliver this higher bar program and we share our science and strategies with natural resource managers farmers local governments anyone with a stake in clean water This fall for example We addressed soil and water district staff from across New York We collaborated with Maryland partners to host a gathering of Chesapeake Bay conservationists We partnered with USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service USDA NRCS to share soil and stream science with farmers in New Holland Pa We traveled to western Pennsylvania to share strategies with colleagues working to protect the Ohio River watershed We spoke to groups in Wilkes Barre Willow Street and State College Pa and Big Flats New York We partnered with Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation to share our latest restoration science with conservation professionals Learning as Shared Discovery A USDA NRCS demonstration of how healthy soils reduce rainfall runoff on a field day hosted by Cover Crop Solutions LLC Photo Lamonte Garber Stroud s approach to outreach takes to heart these words from Ben Franklin Tell me and I forget Teach me and I remember Involve me and I learn Learning works best as shared discovery and we gain many insights from these exchanges with our colleagues and the public For example we ve learned that preventing soil erosion is just the beginning of good farming practice Building soil health is the future Healthy soils have excellent tilth organic matter and healthy microbes Rain infiltrates in these soils and runoff

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/newsletters/2014/issue4/restoration-outreach.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • Connecting Land and Water Solutions: Lamonte Garber Joins Watershed Restoration Group | Upstream Newsletter
    food it provides us Agriculture as a whole represents a cost effective opportunity for environmental improvement compared to many other options Farmers manage a lot of land animals and nutrients so when they make changes it can have a significant impact on their nearby streams on downstream waterways and on groundwater Growing up near scenic Lititz Run in Lancaster County Pa Garber was surrounded by the farming community he loves as well as by Nature s playground He spent much of his childhood fishing bird watching hiking and camping and he saw first hand the long term benefits of watershed restoration Witness to a Stream s Rebirth Lititz Run was once a significantly impaired stream suffering from several types of pollution including sewage and fertilizer runoff Restoration work since 1992 has greatly improved the stream s condition and made it a model for stream restoration Lamonte said I remember when Lititz Run was stocked every season with trout that didn t make it through the heat of the summer Now there are reproducing trout I think a lot of people have the opposite experience They see things get worse over time I got to see what s possible If we can bring together interested landowners with good science and financial resources we can do great things That can do attitude which has even led Garber to Mount Everest base camp is an important part of the Stroud Center s formula for success In welcoming Garber David Wise watershed restoration manager said Lamonte will be a great addition to our group He brings a wealth of experience with agriculture He s especially skillful in helping farmers envision how they can integrate conservation into their operations helping both the farms and the streams He s energetic a thinker and a real gentleman

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/newsletters/2014/issue1/lamonte-garber.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • A Holistic Approach to Restoring Streams | Upstream Newsletter
    streams causes erosion water pollution and disease problems A Growing Partnership Some of the farmers participating in the project have already taken steps to reduce runoff and move cows away from the streams By partnering with the Lancaster County Conservation District the Natural Resources Conservation Service Red Barn Consulting Inc and TeamAg Inc the Watershed Restoration Group will help farmers do even more Our goal is to add forested riparian buffers along the entire length of these two stream stretches over the next two years Buffers are highly effective so they will play a key role Ehrhart says But buffers can become overwhelmed when used in isolation so also important will be barnyard improvements for manure management rain gutters and spouting no till farming and grassed waterways This is the same stream just one growing season after fencing to exclude livestock Improvements such as buffers are low cost alternatives that take time to mature and reach their full potential Associate Research Scientist John Jackson Ph D says From our perspective it s better to address 10 000 feet of stream or 1 000 acres of farmland by using these low cost BMPs than to address a much smaller area using more expensive solutions that maybe look good right away because even if you do everything right in one location if the farms upstream are polluting the water it s going to affect everyone downstream Two Tributaries One Long Study The case for widely used low cost BMPs would benefit from science that proves their value The problem is that long term data describing their effectiveness and how long it takes to restore an impacted stream are lacking In just two years significant improvement can be seen Photos Matt Kofroth Lancaster County Conservation District Jackson and his team of researchers will fill the gap by studying the health of the two tributaries over many years possibly decades Right now they re in the process of establishing a baseline Center scientists like Jackson evaluate and help improve the condition of streams not by measuring one indicator or employing one cure all method but by using many tools all together It s like the difference between only taking care of your heart versus your whole body Jackson explains Will your body be better off if you take care of your heart Sure But if you do that in isolation and neglect your lungs then your body may still suffer The same is true for monitoring and restoring stream health This project is unique in that it presents a best case scenario What happens when everything is done right to restore a stream Different parties have different ways of measuring success adds Ehrhart For example the biggest concern in terms of cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay is reducing nitrogen loads and then phosphorus and sediment There are things that can be done on the landscape to reduce the amount of nitrogen flowing into a stream right away but it can take decades to flush

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/newsletters/2013/issue3/stream-restoration.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • Introducing Our Watershed Restoration Group
    Director of Watershed Restoration Bringing Our Mission Full Circle Matthew Ehrhart former Pennsylvania executive director of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation CBF joined the Center to head the Group and David Wise also formerly of CBF accompanied him to serve as the watershed restoration manager Ehrhart holds a Master of Engineering degree from Penn State s Engineering Science Program After working as an environmental scientist for LandStudies Inc he worked as a watershed restoration consultant before joining CBF where as executive director he was responsible for overseeing a multimillion dollar agricultural restoration initiative in Pennsylvania Wise received his Master of Science degree in Land Resources from the University of Wisconsin Madison Institute for Environmental Studies After serving as an environmental science instructor at Lancaster Mennonite High School he joined CBF first as a biologist and then as the Pennsylvania watershed restoration program manager David Wise Watershed Restoration Manager Together they will bring the Center s mission full circle by sharing knowledge of best management practices BMPs and helping landowners stakeholders and the general public to implement them Center Director Bernard Sweeney said We re excited Matt and Dave are on board By using our research to create green infrastructure the Watershed Restoration Group will help communities prepare for a brighter future for our water Hitting the Ground Running The Watershed Restoration Group has already secured three grants One is provided through the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation NFWF with funding from the U S Environmental Protection Agency EPA the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and Altria Group It will allow the Group to develop a project to help farmers implement BMPs to address common water quality issues by providing technical assistance and advancing nutrient trading Partners include more than a dozen public agencies and private groups and an estimated 27 farms

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/newsletters/2013/issue2/restoration.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • Sponsorship Opportunities
    Center s freshwater research environmental education programs and watershed restoration efforts Sponsorship Levels Beer and Beakers 2 500 00 USD Wine and Water 1 000 00 USD Liquor and Labs 500 00 USD Mulled Cider Friend 250 00 USD About the Event Attendees will enjoy the autumn sunset over music cocktails and hors d oeuvres on Stroud Center s campus and be treated to a presentation by Associate Director Dave Arscott Ph D This event will serve to connect Stroud Water Research Center to a new younger constituency while giving them the opportunity to view and learn about the important work taking place on campus Friday October 9 7 9 30 p m Stroud Water Research Center Tickets 50 per person Audience Millennials and NextGen philanthropists from throughout the Brandywine Valley Business Sponsor levels 2 500 1 000 500 Individual Sponsor 250 Sponsorship Benefits Download as a PDF All sponsor levels will be recognized through Stroud Water Research Center s social media accounts Beer and Beakers 2 500 Logo prominently displayed on invitation as Event Sponsor Name live link on e mail newsletter Stroud website and blasts to constituency Signage at event Eight complimentary tickets Name on all printed materials Listing in 2015 Annual Report see Annual Report examples Wine and Water 1 000 Name live link on e mail newsletter Stroud website and blasts to constituency Signage at event Four complimentary tickets Name on all printed materials Listing in 2015 Annual Report Liquor and Labs 500 Signage at event Two complimentary tickets Name on printed materials Name with live link on Stroud website Listing in 2015 Annual Report Mulled Cider Friend 250 for Individuals Two complimentary tickets Signage at event Listing in 2015 Annual Report Payment must be received by December 1 2015 Federal tax ID number 52 2081073

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/sponsor/ (2016-04-27)
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  • Support our work to advance the global knowledge and stewardship of fresh water — donate now
    Pack Network Events Support Support Home Donate Now Planned Giving Event Calendar Volunteer The Water s Edge Lecture Series Contact Us News What s New News Releases Media Coverage SAFE Water Award Newsletters Annual Reports Search Donate Now Other Ways to Give By Check Paying by check saves us credit card processing fees Download donation form By Telephone Kay Dixon 610 268 2153 ext 303 or Kristine Lisi 610 268 2153 ext 304 Stock Transfers Wire Transactions Click for instructions Shop With Our 1 for the Planet Partner La Matera AmazonSmile Start here and Amazon will donate a portion of your purchase to us GoodSearch GoodShop Give just by searching and shopping the web Learn more Your gift is deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law Friends of Stroud Water Research Center are invited to special events and receive our Upstream Newsletter Business and individual sponsorships are available for many of our events View current sponsorship opportunities Questions Please contact Kay Dixon 610 268 2153 ext 303 kdixon stroudcenter org Get Involved Event Calendar Volunteer The Water s Edge Stroud Memorial Lectures Contact Development Support Home Research Critical Zone Observatory Schuylkill River Project Reforestation Project Long Term Research Stream

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/donate/other-ways-to-give.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • The Headwaters Society: Bequests
    PA the cash sum of dollars for the needs determined as its highest priority by the Director and Board of Directors A percentage of the estate I give and bequeath to Stroud Water Research Center in Avondale PA of my estate for the needs determined as its highest priority by the Director and Board of Directors Residue of the estate The remainder of my estate both real and personal I give and bequeath to Stroud Water Research Center in Avondale PA for the needs determined as its highest priority by the Director and Board of Directors A contingency gift I devise and bequeath the residue of the property owned by me at my death real and personal and wherever situate to PERSON S NAME if he or she survives me If PERSON S NAME does not survive me I devise and bequeath my residuary estate to Stroud Water Research Center in Avondale for the needs determined as its highest priority by the Director and Board of Directors A Codicil Adding a Codicil to a current trust or will If your present planning documents are otherwise in place you may wish to consider adding a brief Codicil or Amendment For illustration here are two examples for incorporation in your will or trust Example 1 I give and bequeath to Stroud Water Research Center in Avondale PA the cash sum of dollars for such needs determined as its highest priority by the Director and Board of Directors Example 2 I give devise and bequeath to Stroud Water Research Center in Avondale PA an amount equivalent to percent of the balance of my residuary estate for such needs of determined as its highest priority by the Director and Board of Directors Learn more about bequests life income gifts retirement plans insurance policies We

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/legacy/bequests.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • The Headwaters Society: Life Income Gifts
    Research Center The most popular types of charitable remainder trusts are Unitrusts and Annuity Trusts In exchange for a gift of cash securities or other assets you will receive guaranteed life income for one or two named beneficiaries receive an immediate charitable income tax deduction choose an option of a DEFERRED GIFT ANNUITY to secure future income know that a substantial gift will be made to Stroud Water Research Center Charitable Remainder Unitrust provides life income for the donor s designated beneficiary ies based on a fixed percentage rate of the fair market value of the trust recalculated annually provides an immediate tax deduction based on payout rate selected and the number and ages of the income beneficiaries gifts may be made in cash appreciated stock to avoid capital gains tax or real estate subject to certain restrictions Charitable Lead Trust This is similar to a remainder trust except that Stroud Water Research Center receives income for the life of the trust with the principal reverting to the donor s designated beneficiary ies at the termination of the trust Normally these trusts are used to reduce estate taxes and pass future growth to heirs Charitable Remainder Annuity Trust Provides life income for the donor s designated beneficiary ies based on a fixed dollar amount which never changes 5 minimum Learn more about bequests life income gifts retirement plans insurance policies We are here to help We are here to discuss your thoughts and to answer questions that may arise We would be pleased to discuss in confidence ways in which you may support Stroud Water Research Center and to provide you with a personalized gift illustration If you are unsure of which planned gift will suit your needs and would like to discuss the options that might be best for

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/legacy/life-income-gifts.shtm (2016-04-27)
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