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  • The Headwaters Society: Retirement Plans
    as a beneficiary of your IRA 401 K or other qualified plan you can provide a gift that does not affect your current cash flow You can designate Stroud to receive all or a portion of the balance of your plan through your plan administrator Benefits You continue to receive your lifetime withdrawals You maintain flexibility to change beneficiaries if your needs change during your lifetime You avoid possible taxes that your retirement savings would face if you designate the remainder to your heirs Learn more about bequests life income gifts retirement plans insurance policies We are here to help We are here to discuss your thoughts and to answer questions that may arise We would be pleased to discuss in confidence ways in which you may support Stroud Water Research Center and to provide you with a personalized gift illustration If you are unsure of which planned gift will suit your needs and would like to discuss the options that might be best for you please email Kristine Lisi Director of Development or call 610 268 2153 ext 304 The information we provide is general in nature and may not apply to all individuals We urge prospective donors to

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/legacy/retirement-plans.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • The Headwaters Society: Insurance Policies
    many ways in which you can make Stroud Water Research Center part of your insurance plans You can transfer ownership of a paid up life insurance policy to Stroud Water Research Center purchase a life insurance policy naming Stroud Water Research Center as the owner and irrevocable beneficiary of the policy donate an existing policy and claim an income tax charitable deduction based on the cash value name Stroud Water Research Center as beneficiary of a life insurance policy Learn more about bequests life income gifts retirement plans insurance policies We are here to help We are here to discuss your thoughts and to answer questions that may arise We would be pleased to discuss in confidence ways in which you may support Stroud Water Research Center and to provide you with a personalized gift illustration If you are unsure of which planned gift will suit your needs and would like to discuss the options that might be best for you please email Kristine Lisi Director of Development or call 610 268 2153 ext 304 The information we provide is general in nature and may not apply to all individuals We urge prospective donors to consult their legal and financial

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/legacy/insurance-policies.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • Crayfish may help restore dirty streams, Stroud study finds
    When crayfish were present in in stream experimental enclosures macroinvertebrate density was higher not lower Stroud Water Research Center s lead fluvial geomorphologist Melinda Daniels Ph D and Lindsey Albertson Ph D a postdoctoral researcher and ecology professor from Montana State University conducted the study in Valley Creek The creek is an urbanized and degraded tributary of the Schuylkill River in King of Prussia a Philadelphia suburb The scientists placed wire mesh enclosures some with crayfish inside and some without in the creek At the conclusion of the 2 week experiment populations of macroinvertebrates such as caddisflies which can indicate better water quality were higher in the crayfish enclosures despite being a food source for crayfish The crayfish enclosures also featured reduced settling of fine sediment pollution on the surface of the streambed As the crayfish disturbed the rock and gravel bottom with their claws they agitated and increased suspension of fine sediments presumably allowing more sediments to flow downstream We were surprised Albertson admitted We thought the crayfish would eat the macroinvertebrates and reduce their populations but we found the opposite Macroinvertebrate density was higher in the crayfish enclosures So even if the crayfish were eating some of the macroinvertebrates we think that all of the fine sediment that had been suspended and washed away created a more macroinvertebrate friendly habitat Many macroinvertebrates don t like to live in streams with high sediment loads It s a type of pollution that degrades freshwater streams and can be traced to land use changes like agriculture and development Daniels said Crayfish show the potential to alleviate some of the problems seen in impaired streams Every organism has its part in an ecosystem and we re still learning what the individual roles are The study Effects of Invasive Crayfish on Fine Sediment

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/press/2016/crayfish-may-help-restore-streams.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • Scientists Study How to Keep Pathogens Out of Drinking Water Sources
    as the program coordinator for Chester County s Agricultural Land Preservation Board You ve got to give credit to those who came before you he says Studying How Farm Practices Can Protect Drinking Water Drinking water supplier SUEZ in Delaware s Stanton Plant relies on the White Clay Creek for two thirds of its source water Hoopes farm is one of several sites scientists are studying to determine how well BMPs on farms may protect drinking water sources from pollution It was also the first project under drinking water supplier SUEZ in Delaware s Watershed Control Plan a plan that was approved by the Environmental Protection Agency SUEZ in Delaware formerly United Water Delaware has partnered with several entities to install streambank fencing and vegetated stream buffers Farms offer one of the best opportunities for making water quality improvements says Dave Arscott Ph D He and fellow Stroud Center scientist Jinjun Kan Ph D are leading the Stroud Center s contribution to the study A simple fence installation can reduce pollution by keeping animals and their waste out of streams But how effective is it That s what SUEZ wants to know SUEZ services 100 000 people and treats 16 million to 18 million gallons of water per day through its Stanton Plant The plant relies on the White Clay Creek for two thirds of its source water Knowing the effectiveness of certain BMPs could help SUEZ promote the use of this approach in other watersheds further protecting source water and assisting other drinking water providers in meeting regulations defined by the Safe Drinking Water Act Promoting Biodiversity and Keeping Streams Healthy Originally the Safe Drinking Water Act focused on water treatment as a means of providing safe drinking water But later amendments added watershed management strategies as an option to stop pollution at its source and to reduce the carbon footprint of water treatment Agricultural BMPs like the ones in this study fall into the prevention camp They can reduce not only nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus from entering streams but also pathogens like Cryptosporidium sp and E coli that can cause intestinal illnesses Farm BMPs also promote biodiversity and keep streams healthy And when streams are healthy they can process nutrients better acting like nature s very own water treatment facilities Stroud Center scientists David Arscott Ph D left and Jinjun Kan Ph D right are working with Kristen Jellison Ph D of Lehigh University to track waterborne pathogens in White Clay Creek Photo Kay Dixon SUEZ s Stanton Plant is located at the confluence of White Clay Creek and Red Clay Creek so the research team selected several study sites located within those watersheds All of the farms are CAFOs or concentrated animal feeding operations Hoopes farm will be compared to another farm near the headwaters of White Clay Creek that does not feature the BMPs his farm uses Unlike Hoopes farm the other paired headwater site currently allows its cows direct access to the stream

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/newsletters/2016/issue2/keeping-pathogens-out.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • Former Intern Embarks on Collaborative Research to Make Drinking Water Safer
    led by Lou Kaplan Ph D Jellison got her first taste of investigative scientific research She was immediately hooked Most of her time was spent either in the field collecting groundwater and streamwater samples or in the lab analyzing those samples for a variety of water quality measures It was all new to me she recalled and the more she learned about the research process the more questions she had I got to see firsthand how scientists develop research questions and how they use data to answer those questions The Stroud Center is where I fell in love with the idea of being able to do that myself It had been a fun summer at the Stroud Center and one that shaped Jellison s career path and research philosophy I learned that if you want to ask a real world question you need to go out into the real world to collect data and what I loved about my time here was how nature was our laboratory I saw the multidisciplinary approach and how the principal investigators worked together on projects and I took that approach with me in my career Jellison decided to pursue a graduate degree to reach her new career goal After Cornell she went on to earn a Ph D in civil and environmental engineering from MIT I was excited about being able to design my own approach to collecting data and then figuring out what this new information might reveal Dirty Water Is a Real World Problem Her interests led her to research how to prevent the transmission of waterborne diseases in water supply and sanitation systems I m interested in learning how to make water safe to drink That s not getting any easier as population and development are increasing particularly in poor countries

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/newsletters/2016/issue2/kristen-jellison.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • Stroud Presents: Food’s the Prize for Female Flies Looking to Mate
    bees with a presentation about trees On March 8 he attended a TreeVitalize Partners Meeting in Philadelphia to explain the latest developments in improving survivorship and growth of TreeVitalize tree plantings Hosting International Visitors Then on March 18 Sweeney along with Education Director Steve Kerlin and Assistant Director of Education Tara Muenz introduced the Stroud Center s research education and restoration activities to a group from the International Visitor Leadership Program for Water Resources Management For the last several years the Stroud Center has hosted visitors from around the world who attend the program Valérie Ouellet Ph D postdoctoral research associate traveled down under to Melbourne Australia for the 11th International Symposium on Ecohydraulics Photo Valérie Ouellet Launched in 1940 the International Visitor Leadership Program seeks to build mutual understanding between the United States and other nations through carefully designed professional visits for current and emerging foreign leaders Thermal Challenges Facing Fish In February Valérie Ouellet Ph D postdoctoral research associate traveled down under to Melbourne Australia for the 11th International Symposium on Ecohydraulics On the 12th she presented a paper she and Melinda Daniels Ph D associate research scientist authored Travelling Downstream Thermal Challenges Facing Fish Water temperature can affect the survivorship of brook trout and other fish Ouellet and Daniels found that the mosaic of riparian landscapes limits the connectivity between suitable cold water habitats when too few forested patches are present or if they are not evenly distributed through the watershed thus limiting fish movement in the stream Stroud Teaches Participants in the Trout Grow on Trees workshop at the PAEE annual meeting created and colored their own trout Photo Tara Muenz Education Department Presents Trout Grow on Trees to Pa Environmental Educators The Pennsylvania Association of Environmental Educators PAEE held its annual conference in the Poconos this past March Surrounded in a gorgeous setting teachers naturalists students and Stroud Water Research Center education staff came together to engage environmental education Making its debut with the PAEE community was the education department s Trout Grow on Trees Program Tara Muenz led attendees in a session to learn about the Stroud Center the importance of streamside forests how to make watershed tea and many of the watershed stewardship tools now available from the Stroud Center By the end the whole group knew why and how Trout Grow on Trees Check out these other recent presentations by the Stroud Center s education department Kerlin S February 26 27 2016 Exhibit Stroud Center restoration and education outreach programs at the Keystone Coldwater Conference State College Pa Muenz T February 27 2016 Exhibit Stroud Center education programs at the Delaware Association for Environmental Educators State Conference Tatnall High School Wilmington Del Stroud Center Personnel March 12 2016 Exhibit Stroud Center WikiWatershed Model My Watershed and sensors at the Schuylkill Watershed Congress Pottstown Pa Aufdenkampe A Daniels M Muenz T March 12 2016 Oral Model My Watershed v2 An Online Professional Toolkit for Restoration in the Delaware River Basin at Schuylkill Watershed

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/newsletters/2016/issue2/presentations.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • Media Coverage
    is Focus of Large Scale Restoration Project Yale environment260 2014 March 11 Freshwater Research Scientist to Deliver Healthy Streams Program for Area Farmers BCTV org 2014 March 30 Wild Trout Rare in Pa But Some Seek Them The Reading Eagle 2014 April 5 Stroud Makes Case for More Forest Buffers Lancaster Farming 2014 April 17 Pocopson Students Learn Fish Grow On Trees Daily Local News 2014 May 20 Under the Surface Fracking Wastewater Proves Devastating to Mayflies Truthout 2013 June 10 Enthusiasm Gas Tank for Riparian Forest Buffers Refilled at Stroud Whitescarver Natural Resources Management 2013 April 26 New trees to help purify Brandywine Creek waters Daily Local News 2013 April 24 Stroud Water Research Center building achieves highest green building honor The Unionville Times 2013 April 17 Coldwaters could mean less travel for universities The News Virginian 2012 December 30 Fight over natural gas pipelines continue Daily Local News 2012 December 3 Trees act as both worst storm problems best storm solutions University of Delaware Review 2011 March 15 DENIN and DNREC launch EcoCafé workshops UDaily 2011 March 12 Buffers Pastures Focus of Meeting Targeted at Plain Sect Producers Lancaster Farming 2011 April Liquid Science Avondale s Stroud Water Research Center has its eye on a precious resource Main Line Today 2010 December 4 Pocopson students help plant new trees The Unionville Times 2010 October 30 Tour of Stroud Center Focuses on Forested Buffers Lancaster Farming 2010 October 06 Chester County s share 4 million for environmental projects Daily Local News 2010 April 21 Monitors find healthy signs in Hay Creek near Birdsboro bctv org 2009 December 31 Leaf Pack Breaking New Ground by Studying Bugs Stormwater Journal 2009 November 8 Drilling for Natural Gas Jeopardizes Clean Water Rodale News 2009 October 19 Team to study human effect on

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/news/media.shtm (2016-04-27)
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  • Clean, Fresh Water is Essential to Bhutan’s Gross National Happiness
    on November 5 the second of a three day international conference organized by The Centre for Bhutan Studies and Gross National Happiness Research The next day Robert F Kennedy Jr president of Waterkeeper Alliance will speak at the GNH conference about the importance of good water quality to health and happiness Waterkeeper Alliance is an international organization of more than 260 Waterkeepers protecting waterways across the globe which now includes the Thim Chu Waterkeeper in Bhutan Our visit will be part implementation and part exploration said Bernard W Sweeney Ph D director of Stroud Water Research Center whose scientists will provide equipment and training We will be helping to establish water monitoring stations but also collecting samples to increase the knowledge and understanding of the region s water resources Sweeney expects the Stroud Center research team will find the water quality is reasonably good We know there is a strong correlation between water quality and population density and the population density in Bhutan is low and mostly concentrated in the lowlands Plus the country is about 60 percent forested another good indicator of good water quality said Sweeney In Bhutan we have lots of data about water quantity but not about water quality said Karma Dupchu chief hydrology officer at Bhutan s Ministry of Economic Affairs Our purpose in establishing the Thim Chu Waterkeeper is to ultimately empower the people to take care of their waterways by participating in citizen science water monitoring said Sharon Khan international director of Waterkeeper Alliance Bhutan has some of the most pristine waterways in the world Fortunately the country prides itself on its environmental health In 1972 Bhutan s 4th king rejected Gross National Product as a measure of the nation s prosperity and introduced the aspirational goal of Gross National Happiness GNH The

    Original URL path: http://www.swrc.org/press/2015/clean-water-essential-to-bhutans-happiness.shtm (2016-04-27)
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