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  • Bequests
    work of the Teton Regional Land Trust is permanent The easements we hold over properties are never removed and can only be strengthened with time A bequest or gift to the Teton Regional Land Trust through your will is the most simple way for you to make a lasting contribution to conservation of the Eastern Idaho Bequests offer flexibility you retain use of your assets and can make changes at any time to reflect your philanthropic and financial goals And a charitable bequest is deductible for federal estate tax purposes There are several common forms of charitable bequest Cash Bequest Designate a specific amount for Teton Regional Land Trust Residuary Bequest Direct all or a percentage of your estate to Teton Regional Land Trust after payment of cash bequests and estate related expenses Bequest of Property Direct a particular asset such as real estate securities or tangible personal property to the Teton Regional Land Trust Contact This email address is being protected from spambots You need JavaScript enabled to view it at Teton Regional Land Trust for more information How do I get started Your attorney will be the principal advisor in preparing your will Teton Regional Land Trust can provide sample language for specific residuary and remainder bequests and is willing to review any draft documents upon request If your bequest to Teton Regional Land Trust involves real estate it is very important for you to meet with our staff while the will is still in preparation so that we can discuss your plans and intentions and ensure that we can meet them Seek professional assistance Every person who is preparing an estate plan should seek the advice of an attorney before executing a will Not only are there issues of estate taxes and distribution to consider but there

    Original URL path: http://www.tetonlandtrust.org/bequests (2016-02-14)
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  • Trusts
    annual income to a donor Depending on how a donor funds the remainder trust it is possible to reduce capital gains and even estate taxes What is a charitable remainder trust A charitable remainder trust is an independently managed account that issues payments to beneficiaries A CRT may continue either for the lives of the beneficiaries or for a fixed term of up to 20 years When the trust terminates the remaining assets will be transferred to the Teton Regional Land Trust CRTs are funded with cash or appreciated property stock bonds land or other marketable property The payments will be paid to you or designated beneficiaries on a quarterly semi annual or annual basis until the trust ends Many people choose a lawyer or financial institution to serve as a trustee The trustee manages the assets to generate income for the beneficiaries as well as increase the principal for the charitable beneficiary How does it work 1 You transfer cash securities or other appreciated property to a charitable remainder trust CRT 2 Each year the CRT pays a percentage of its value to you or your named beneficiaries The CRT value is recalculated annually so payments change from year to year OR The CRT makes a fixed annual payment to you or to beneficiaries you name Charitable Remainder Annuity Trusts 3 When the CRT terminates the remainder passes to TRLT Benefits You receive an immediate income tax deduction for a portion of your contribution to the trust CRT pays no capital gains tax when it sells the contributed assets You or a beneficiary receive income for life or a term of years You can make additional gifts to the trust and qualify for additional tax deductions and increased trust payments You have the satisfaction of knowing that the remainder of the trust will go to help TRLT preserve more land in Eastern Idaho Please consult you estate planning attorney for details or contact Babette Thorpe at TRLT for a referral to a professional who can help Charitable Lead Trust Charitable Lead Trusts CLT are an excellent way to give immediate and sustained support to the Teton Regional Land Trust Although there are several types of lead trusts donors are generally seeking to lower their gift and estate taxes while leaving their children and grandchildren a larger inheritance CLTs enable individuals who have large taxable estates to pass assets to their heirs at reduced tax rates What is a charitable lead trust A charitable lead trust is an irrevocable trust account funded with cash stock bonds land or other marketable assets The CLT makes periodic payments to designated charities At the end of the CLT the remaining assets are distributed to the designated heirs CLTs are established either for a specified term of years or for the lives of one or more individuals While the trust is in existence the trustee the designated trust manager is often a lawyer or financial institution invests the trust assets and distributes specified annual

    Original URL path: http://www.tetonlandtrust.org/planned-gifts-contribute/trusts-contribute (2016-02-14)
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  • Donor Advised Funds
    giving vehicle administered by a public charity and created for the purpose of managing charitable donations on behalf of an organization family or individual A donor advised fund offers the opportunity to create an easy to establish low cost flexible vehicle for charitable giving as an alternative to direct giving or creating a private foundation Donors enjoy administrative convenience cost savings and tax advantages by conducting their grantmaking through the fund How does it work 1 You make a tax deductible gift of cash securities or property to a Donor Advised Fund DAF either through The Community Foundation of Teton Valley Idaho Community Foundation or through your own financial advisor or community foundation facility 2 You recommend distributions annual or more often from your DAF to go to TRLT for its continuing conservation work The community foundation reviews your recommendation and makes the gift in your fund s name 3 The community foundation or other facility provides all ongoing record keeping and tax preparation for your DAF Benefits You enjoy more ongoing tax benefits with a DAF than with a private foundation You pay no start up costs You get a tax deduction for the contribution to a DAF in

    Original URL path: http://www.tetonlandtrust.org/planned-gifts-contribute/daf (2016-02-14)
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  • Giving Through Your Retirement Account
    Your Retirement Account Giving Through Your Retirement Account and Life Insurance Policy Giving Through Your Retirement Account You can avoid both income AND estate taxes associated with your retirement account by donating the entire account or annual distributions to Teton Regional Land Trust Contributing to our work in this way will benefit you as well as your heirs The current IRA Charitable rollover provision allows many investors 70½ or older to transfer as much as 100 000 a year from an individual retirement account directly to a qualified charity without having to count any of that transfer as taxable income The transfer of income to a charity counts toward the taxpayer s required minimum distribution for that year Please meet with your financial advisor before making changes to your retirement plan distributions If you choose to give the remainder of your retirement plan you need only name Teton Regional Land Trust as the beneficiary of your IRA 401 k or other qualified plan Giving Through Your Life Insurance Policy You can name the Teton Regional Land Trust as the beneficiary of your insurance policy and leave a legacy that will help preserve the landscapes you love Like most others you may have an insurance policy to provide for a spouse child or loved one But over time the needs of your family may have changed A life insurance policy that has outlived its purpose or needs updating may be the perfect vehicle for a charitable donation to TRLT Just ask your insurance company for the appropriate forms to make the TRLT the beneficiary of the policy You may also name the TRLT as contingent beneficiary so the policy passes to TRLT only if your primary beneficiary no longer needs it Tax savings If your estate is subject to estate or

    Original URL path: http://www.tetonlandtrust.org/planned-gifts-contribute/giving (2016-02-14)
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  • Bequests
    are never removed and can only be strengthened with time A bequest or gift to the Teton Regional Land Trust through your will is the most simple way for you to make a lasting contribution to conservation of the Eastern Idaho Bequests offer flexibility you retain use of your assets and can make changes at any time to reflect your philanthropic and financial goals And a charitable bequest is deductible for federal estate tax purposes There are several common forms of charitable bequest Cash Bequest Designate a specific amount for Teton Regional Land Trust Residuary Bequest Direct all or a percentage of your estate to Teton Regional Land Trust after payment of cash bequests and estate related expenses Bequest of Property Direct a particular asset such as real estate securities or tangible personal property to the Teton Regional Land Trust Contact This email address is being protected from spambots You need JavaScript enabled to view it at Teton Regional Land Trust for more information How do I get started Your attorney will be the principal advisor in preparing your will Teton Regional Land Trust can provide sample language for specific residuary and remainder bequests and is willing to review any draft documents upon request If your bequest to Teton Regional Land Trust involves real estate it is very important for you to meet with our staff while the will is still in preparation so that we can discuss your plans and intentions and ensure that we can meet them Seek professional assistance Every person who is preparing an estate plan should seek the advice of an attorney before executing a will Not only are there issues of estate taxes and distribution to consider but there may be potential complications when beneficiaries involve minor children or real estate owned by multiple

    Original URL path: http://www.tetonlandtrust.org/planned-gifts-contribute/bequest (2016-02-14)
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  • Conservation Easement Protects Teton Valley Farm
    fourth generation family farm west of the Tetons in Idaho could have been developed into hundreds of homes Instead the family chose to protect the farm and its 869 acres of vital wildlife habitat forever The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Teton Regional Land Trust and Natural Resources Conservation Service NRCS recently announced a new conservation easement on the Garry and MaeDene Jardine farm near Tetonia Idaho A legal agreement that stays with the property even if it changes ownership the easement prevents residential development from spoiling the land s agricultural and wildlife values Thanks to the spirit and generosity of the Jardine family conservation groups were allowed to purchase the easement at a tiny fraction of its value said David Allen president and CEO of the Elk Foundation The end result is great news for the region s elk herd as well as other wildlife Michael Whitfield former executive director and founder of the Teton Regional Land Trust said This easement is a tremendous gift to the community and wildlife of Teton Valley Garry and MaeDene s gift of the permanent conservation of outstanding wildlife habitat and farmland will benefit generations to come We would like to thank all the partners involved in the project especially all of the neighbors and private donors The Jardine easement was a very important project for NRCS The easement protects important farmland that will be needed for future food and fiber production as more and more farmland is removed from agricultural production said NRCS assistant state soil scientist Hal Swenson The location of the property provides important winter habitat for large game and migratory birds Working with the Teton Regional Land Trust is very enjoyable They are professional people who are dedicated not only to the future of Teton County but to southeast Idaho

    Original URL path: http://www.tetonlandtrust.org/land-protection/recent-projects/1187-conservation-easement-protects-teton-valley-farm (2016-02-14)
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  • Historic Gold Ranch Conserved
    after breeding T he Teton Regional Land Trust partnered with Madison County s Gold Ranch landowners to preserve important bird habitat on the Henry s Fork of the Snake River The 572 acre property borders the Lower Henry s Fork for nearly one mile and also borders Texas and Mulligan Sloughs The Gold Ranch project is a component of a larger conservation partnership that has protected 1 800 acres of contiguous private lands surrounding the Cartier Slough Wildlife Management Area CSWMA The CSWMA is a wetland riparian grassland complex managed by Idaho Fish and Game IDFG and provides habitat for a large variety of wildlife including 197 species of birds IDFG outlined in 2002 that the most crucial abundant and sensitive of these habitats are riparian areas and wetlands that provide critical nesting feeding and loafing habitat for waterbirds The Gold Ranch Conservation Easement property adds a significant amount of protected wetland riparian habitat along the Henry s Fork that is adjacent to the CSWMA and acts as an extension of available nesting foraging and roosting habitat for waterbird species Three additional migratory bird refuges Market Lake Wildlife Management Area Mud Lake Wildlife Management Area and Camas National Wildlife Refuge lie west of Gold Ranch Many birds that breed in these refuges depend on the Lower Henry s Fork including the Gold Ranch to forage during and after breeding Waterfowl hunters can expect an increase in local waterfowl production from extensive restoration that targetsenhanced nesting and brood rearing habitat on Gold Ranch TRLTLand Protection Specialist Matt Lucia explained The Land Trust has been monitoring the Gold Ranch property and has seen an increase in waterfowl production due to the enhancements of habitat Bird enthusiasts of all kinds will enjoy the increase of non game birds due to the conservation of this important bird habitat The wetlands of the Lower Henry s Fork are critical migration stopovers nesting grounds and foraging areas for one half million waterfowl and several hundred thousand other waterbird species These areas surrounding Gold Ranch are important breeding habitat for bird species including mallard lesser scaup pintail sandhill cranes American white pelican whitefaced ibis black tern and long billed curlew Trumpeter swans are also greatly dependant on the wintering habitat found along the Lower Henry s Fork Conserving Gold Ranch has added a significant measure of protection to nesting and wintering bald eagles An active bald eagle nest lies near the boundary of the property and open water and abundant prey provide vital wintering habitat The majority of the Gold Ranch property has been grazed by cattle or in grain production for over 100 years For the past 80 years Gold Ranch has been farmed for small grains grass hay and alfalfa In 1976 the property was flooded due to the failure of the Teton Dam Historical water channels that have been empty since the Teton Dam flood are now restored Management of the property also provides wetland food plots such as Japanese millet to accommodate foraging

    Original URL path: http://www.tetonlandtrust.org/land-protection/recent-projects/1185-historic-gold-ranch-conserved (2016-02-14)
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  • Families preserve additional acreage on the Packsaddle bench
    Service and the Three toed woodpecker an Idaho Fish and Game Species of Greatest Conservation Need have both been observed on the property Numerous mammals such as moose mule deer elk black bear fox and coyote use the property The rich habitats found on the property allow many birds and mammals to find food and shelter on this land for much of the annual cycle T he Teton Regional Land Trust recently assisted Al and Lee McGlinsky and Boyd and Barbara Norton to preserve 125 acres of wildlife rich forest lands above the Packsaddle bench bordering the National Forest in Teton County Idaho The McGlinsky and Norton families own 379 forested acres northeast of Driggs above the Packsaddle bench Both families formerly of Idaho Falls bought the property in the 1960 s and have spent many years with their children camping and hiking on their land In 2001 the families placed an initial 254 acres under conservation easement and have now chosen to place their remaining 125 acres under an additional easement The two easements buffer the adjoining National Forest adding landscape scale impact to the conserved land The McGlinsky and Norton families have chosen to safeguard their land from development and help preserve important wildlife habitat The property is mostly covered by an old age mixed conifer and Douglas fir forest which provides habitat for many rare bird species including the Northern goshawk and Cooper s hawk both of which have been found nesting on the property Great gray owl a species considered sensitive by the Forest Service and the Three toed woodpecker an Idaho Fish and Game Species of Greatest Conservation Need have both been observed on the property Numerous mammals such as moose mule deer elk black bear fox and coyote use the property The rich habitats found on the property allow many birds and mammals to find food and shelter on this land for much of the annual cycle This property also provides considerable scenic value to the public because of its visibility from the Packsaddle Dry Hollow Forest Service access road The Forest Service access road is a popular travel route for mountain bikers and hikers in the summer and snowmobilers in the winter When we found the land it was love at first sight Barbara Norton said Boyd and I grew up out east and saw what a mess things were When we moved west we were struck by the beauty in Idaho and we didn t want to see it developed the way the east was We were looking ahead to a time where there might be a lot of change and didn t want to see our land sold off or developed Boyd Norton said of his land The Nortons and the McGlinskys have been involved in conservation since the 1960 s helping to preserve areas such as the Jedediah Smith Wilderness The Nortons are still very active in the conservation arena working all over the world People in the world don

    Original URL path: http://www.tetonlandtrust.org/land-protection/recent-projects/7-families-preserve-additional-acreage-on-the-packsaddle-bench (2016-02-14)
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