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  • Combating Disease and Starvation | The Family International
    malnutrition or disease Our first challenge was to stock the orphanage with as much food as we could buy with our limited funds A morning of trudging through mud and filth at the central market netted about 500 kg 1 100 lb of rice beans flour tomato paste oil etc Our next challenge was to get it all to the orphanage as we had no vehicle UN peacekeepers whom we met hitchhiking volunteered their two Jeeps for the trip to the orphanage one to carry the supplies and one for the five of us Esther Angela Kaylee John and Théophile This way the UN captain asked in disbelief when we came to the flooded dirt road that led to the orphanage It wasn t long before the Bible adage Two are better than one Ecclesiastes 4 9 10 took on new meaning When one Jeep got stuck in the mud the other was able to pull it out We had a wonderful time at the orphanage giving the children special attention encouraging the staff and presenting the Family produced educational and inspirational materials we had brought for them a Start Early poster set and Feed My Lambs booklets in French Next we needed to find a way for the orphanage to become more self sufficient and Théophile agreed that an agricultural project would best meet that need With financial and legal assistance from people we met as we followed an initial lead we helped Théophile buy a two hectare field outside of Kinshasa When we needed to deliver gardening tools and seeds to the site the UN peacekeepers who had driven us to the orphanage volunteered again After we returned to South Africa we received an email from Théophile saying that the UN peacekeepers had returned to the orphanage with

    Original URL path: http://www.thefamilyinternational.org/en/work/africa/articles/2006/185/ (2016-02-15)
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  • All in a Day | The Family International
    and no food On top of that the temperature was below freezing and it was snowing Before our visit some supermarkets in South Africa had donated five bags of bread vegetables and pies which we delivered to the school Others had donated clothes and shoes The school staff and children were overjoyed When we returned to South Africa we gave Moso the school director a lift over the border to

    Original URL path: http://www.thefamilyinternational.org/en/work/africa/articles/2006/184/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Blankets and warm clothes for over 200 children | The Family International
    who attend barefoot and with ragged clothes We identified the neediest children and gave out 15 warm fleecy blankets The next week we gave out fifty more one to a family There were still some children who had received nothing to keep warm and the weather was getting worse with temperatures below 0ºC at night When you live in a tin shack and sleep on the floor you really feel it We promised the children they would get something the following Sunday and prayed the Lord would supply some more blankets and winter clothing for the remaining children We also prayed for extra bread as there had been so little of that as well and by the end of the week we had an abundance of bread and the problem of how to transport it to the centre But still no blankets Halfway through Saturday a vehicle drove into our centre with blankets jumpers hats warm trousers etc It was a wonderful sight and a real testimony to the people who brought them when we explained how that God has used them to answer our prayers The next day we had such a wonderful time outfitting all the children with

    Original URL path: http://www.thefamilyinternational.org/en/work/africa/articles/2006/64/ (2016-02-15)
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  • The Family International Africa | The Family International
    Contact Email Us Sitemap Home Worldwide Work Africa 2002 Articles The Family International Africa View by Project View by Year Showers of Blessings It had been an unusually cold and wet week In fact half of our team was stuck in Durban due to snow on the mountain pass between there and home This is Africa Tweet All Regions Africa Kenya Madagascar Nigeria South Africa Uganda America Central America North

    Original URL path: http://www.thefamilyinternational.org/en/work/africa/articles/2002/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Showers of Blessings | The Family International
    various ongoing projects for the past several years leaving many of the five hundred inhabitants homeless Could we help It did not seem very likely I was home alone with the children and don t drive I made a few phone calls and in a short while we had 200 kg of mealie meal the staple food for most poor people promised Next came a sack of dehydrated chicken casserole We delivered the food as soon as we were able to arrange transport Then better news yet A company donated 550 quality blankets worth about US 10 each and one of our other sponsors offered to transport them for us When we arrived at Diepsloot with the truck piled high with boxes of blankets SABC National South African TV was there filming the disaster They followed us around as we distributed blankets to 120 HIV positive children 58 to our orphanage crèche where we have been told by an expert that probably 40 are HIV positive 60 to the mentally handicapped project where we teach another 40 to the aged 40 to the unemployed women at the food garden we helped organize two years ago and the rest to other flood victims It was wonderful to see all those happy smiling faces as they received beautiful new blankets We also received more donations of fresh fruit and vegetables and other foodstuffs that week than usual so we were able to distribute about US 1 000 worth of food between these different projects When Chris took food to a school where there had been 70 malnourished children the headmaster informed us that there were now 120 children on the list Some were faint with hunger Others as young as 7 were trying to cook and care for their families because their

    Original URL path: http://www.thefamilyinternational.org/en/work/africa/articles/2002/94/ (2016-02-15)
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  • The Family International Kenya: Articles | The Family International
    malnutrition due to extreme poverty 2010 Articles 1 Food Distribution Scheme Nairobi Weekly Feeding Program highlights Food staples e g maize rice and beans are regularly distributed by our Family Care Missions volunteers 2008 Articles 2 Changing Lives We met Michael and his brother Steven seven years ago in Mombassa They came to our door after they had received a call from the Lord to start a work with children

    Original URL path: http://www.thefamilyinternational.org/en/work/africa/kenya/articles/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Photo Gallery: Food Distribution Scheme, Nairobi | The Family International
    Search Home About The Family Mission Statement Worldwide Work Children Viewpoints Contact Email Us Sitemap Home Worldwide Work Africa Kenya Food Distribution Scheme Nairobi Photo Gallery Photo Gallery Food Distribution Scheme Nairobi Tweet Africa Kenya Madagascar Nigeria South Africa Uganda

    Original URL path: http://www.thefamilyinternational.org/en/work/africa/kenya/projects/aid-distribution/photos/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Olives Rehabilitation Center | The Family International
    these needy children It also boosted our faith for greater things and the counsel we received clarified our vision Seeing the needs around me I couldn t just sit and do nothing about them The following motivational quotes from the classes kept ringing in my mind All it takes for evil to continue is for good people to do nothing We can either be thermometers or thermostats Thermometers pick up the temperature Thermostats set the temperature I d rather be a thermostat than a thermometer I d rather set the temperature than pick up the temperature around In July 2000 my brother and I started teaching basic literacy skills to neglected children and teens in a small two room building We selected the children by a simple screening process where we would interview the child and the parent or guardian of the child and then choose the most needy cases In the beginning the school was open only in the mornings and most of the children were not able to pay any fee as they were from very poor backgrounds Many even came from teenage led households As time went on we realized that the children were too hungry to learn as many came without eating breakfast so we started a feeding program and later we were able to extend the time to two more hours of teaching in the afternoons for five days a week As children were added we slowly expanded with the help of Family Care Missions and our newfound sponsors In time the initial simple structure was slowly renovated through donations from Family Care Missions and local donors and we were able to add three more classrooms a small library and a small office During the first five years the program which started with 60 children expanded to teaching 90 children Teachers helped out on a voluntary basis namely those who were doing an internship from a local college or university We also hired accredited teachers Through collaboration with other charitable projects for children at risk within the coast province we learned a lot We registered the Olives Rehabilitation Program with the government as a community based organization Registering enabled us to more freely network with other community based organizations and to be accepted in the community To run any type of work in the community CBO status community based organization is the minimum registration that is required by law Compassion for these children in need and the love of Christ compel us to keep striving to develop this project further Since our humble and small beginnings we have grown to where we now take care of nearly 300 children and also teach train and encourage volunteers caretakers of the children and those in the community who struggle with the hardships of life One of the biggest lessons we ve learned through working with a community which is facing many challenges due to poverty drug and alcohol abuse and crime is the importance of patience love

    Original URL path: http://www.thefamilyinternational.org/en/work/africa/kenya/articles/2011/230/ (2016-02-15)
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