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  • The Jewish Museum - Search
    families students and educators and visitors of all abilities explore our programs About Welcome About the JM Contact Connect FAQs Rentals Located on New York City s Museum Mile the Jewish Museum is a distinctive hub for art and Jewish culture for people of all backgrounds From our unique collection to our distinctive exhibitions and dynamic education programs there is always something to see and do learn more Support Membership Individual Giving Corporate Support Planned Giving Travel Program Special Events Become a member today Individual Corporate and Foundation support are crucial to furthering the Jewish Museum s mission to collect preserve exhibit and interpret art and Jewish culture View All Memberships Shop Open today from 11 am 5 45 pm See what s on today Search 13 search results Collection 13 results Purim Mask Ita Aber American b Canada 1932 Woman s Shoes Hallah Cover Tefillin Bag Purim Costume Vest Purim Costume Sash Purim Costume Crown Marriage Dress Fashions for the Millennium Protective Amulet Costume Michael Berkowitz American b 1952 Jews in the Synagogue Rembrandt van Rijn Dutch 1606 1669 Marriage Contract Quilt Joseph Dwelleth in Egypt James Jacques Joseph Tissot French 1836 1902 Adam and Eve Driven From Paradise James Jacques Joseph Tissot French 1836 1902 Contact Us 1109 5th Ave at 92nd St New York NY 10128 Directions 212 423 3200 info thejm org Connect With Us Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Tumblr Pinterest Join Us Members enjoy valuable benefits including free admission discounts and previews of new exhibitions while helping the Museum to celebrate and share the rich artistic and cultural heritage of the Jewish people Become a member Terms Conditions Privacy Policy Press Accessibility About This Site 2016 The Jewish Museum TheJewishMuseum Gay Block and Malka Drucker A Recontextualized Ketubbah marriage contract ow ly YiXJP pic twitter

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/search/collection?keywords=Costumes (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Torah Ark Curtain, 1680/81 (date of inscription)
    is an elaborate version of a motif found on many smaller textiles such as Torah binders and reader s desk covers Neither is the motif of the Tablets of the Covenant surrounded by a glory of clouds unusual it is found on many Italian Torah curtains of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and is a Baroque convention for the presentation of a holy object or personage On this curtain however the clouds are above a landscape The Tablets emerging from the glory link it to a mountain which is identified by another quotation from Psalms as the mountain that God has desired for His abode Psalms 68 17 The reference in this passage is not to Mount Sinai where the Tablets were received but to Mount Moriah on which the Temple was built Thus the mountain on this curtain has a dual iconographic function it is the locus for the giving of the Tablets and a link to the representation of Jerusalem below Only one other Torah curtain has similar decoration Still the property of the Venetian Jewish community its iconographic elements include Mount Sinai represented by three peaks on Byzantine paintings The curtain was created by Stella Peragia in 1673 The greater detail and naturalism of the Peragia curtain and its earlier date suggest that it was the model for the Meshullami composition in which the forms are more stylized and disjointed What is unusual about these two curtains is the detailed representation of Jerusalem unique in Torah curtain iconography but common on another type of seventeenth century Italian Judaica decorated ketubbot or marriage contracts Since the Italian Jewish marriage ceremony includes the recitation of Psalm 128 which mentions Jerusalem and remembrances of the city s destruction conclude every Jewish wedding depictions of the city were appropriate to the decoration of the contracts displayed at the ceremony The exact source of the curtains representations of Jerusalem distinguished by the elaborate towers at each juncture of the walls and by the main gates in the form of aediculae has not yet been identified There is no doubt however that its use on the curtain was inspired by the decorations of ketubbot creating an iconographic link between two forms of Judaica prominent in the lives of women Source Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 pp 108 109 Bibliography Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 pp 108 109 Kayser Stephen and Guido Schoenberger eds JEWISH CEREMONIAL ART Philadelphia Jewish Publication Society of America 1959 no 5 Kirshenblatt Gimblett Barbara FABRIC OF JEWISH LIFE TEXTILES FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM COLLECTION Exh cat New York The Jewish Museum 1977 p 6 Kleeblatt Norman L Dr Vivian B Mann TREASURES OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 1986 pp 70 71 Makover S J THE JEWISH PATRONS OF VENICE Exh brochure New York The Jewish Museum 1985 no 3 Vilynay Z THE HOLY LAND IN

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/8162-torah-ark-curtain (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Quilt, c. 1899
    her skirt a common gesture in folk dancing a dancing man and a seated musician playing the balalaika The source for these three figures can be traced to Russian folk art where they are found as a group in a design known as the Russian border This design became popular in the late nineteenth century in printed textiles marketed among peasants A printed calico from the 1870s in the State History Museum in Moscow features the so called Russian border with the motif of a dancing couple and musician in a repeat pattern Four panels feature roosters a motif also found in late nineteenth century Jewish textiles from Eastern Europe The roosters in this quilt all face left probably embroidered after a set pattern In the 1880s and 1890s however the rooster was being used in America as a symbol for the Democratic Party A political crazy quilt dated 1885 incorporating political ribbons and other memorabilia from the Cleveland Hendricks presidential campaign features a strutting rooster facing left Another crazy quilt made in 1885 90 and today in the collection of the American Folk Art Museum 1985 23 3 also features the Democratic rooster Its appearance there has been interpreted as possibly reflecting the maker s aspiration for the women s vote implemented only in 1920 It is difficult to ascertain however whether the rooster has a political significance in The Jewish Museum quilt The decoration in the border relates mainly to life in America Symbols of patriotism such as the American flag are combined with the Star of David a symbol of Jewish heritage Two crossed American flags are flanked by depictions of Admiral Dewey and of a typical Russian woman dancing representing the Old and the New Worlds The popularity of Admiral George Dewey 1837 1917 was at its peak in the United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries The hero of the Spanish American War Dewey had returned to New York to lead a victory parade in 1899 briefly running for president in 1900 Dewey s victory prompted the manufacturing of a wide array of products beating his image In a letter to Dewey his colleague Thomas 0 Selfridge writes They are selling Dewey hats Dewey cigarettes Dewey canes There are Dewey spoons Dewey candlesticks Dewey paper weights Since Dewey was not promoted to the rank of admiral until March 1899 the quilt could only have been completed after this date although the central panel bears an 1898 date Several motifs in the border are connected to various sports that became popular in America beginning in the late nineteenth or early twentieth century including tennis and hot air ballooning The Davis Cup tennis tournament was inaugurated in 1900 and the first international hot air balloon competition was launched in Paris in 1906 and won by an American who popularized the sport in the United States A crazy quilt in the Herbert Offen Collection features tennis racquets in combination with butterflies as seen in this

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/1953-quilt (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Untitled, 1972
    shapes of the letters themselves Like other members of the Beat movement and the poets of his generation Berman pursued an interest in the commonplace and a belief in the transformative potential of the everyday blending a neo Dadaist Surrealist sensibility and a spirituality founded in mystical kabbalistic beliefs Berman personified the Beat Generation especially its interdisciplinary concerns and its strong association with literature After moving from New York to California in the early 1950s he founded Semina seed a handmade magazine of art and poetry that was also a folio or assemblage scrapbook which he published and sent to friends As its editor Berman exercised little discrimination concentrating instead on shaping the context so that each folio issue would possess an overall collage like aspect Such an openly interpretive positioning of meaning to be completed by the observer reader was integral to the poetics of neo Dadaism which was spelled out in the first Semina packet in a poem by Hermann Hesse Wherever the seeds of light the magnificent falls Comes change In the 1968 film Easy Rider director Dennis Hopper a collector of Berman s work gave the artist a bit part consisting of sowing seeds in the arid soil of a desert commune A modest homage to this prominent member of the West Coast Beat Generation whose cross cultural pursuits in addition to his art included photography poetry music and film the role symbolized not only Berman s broad cultural influence but also his distance from the East Coast art establishment In the 1950s Berman along with other California artists such as Bruce Conner George Herms and Edward Kienholz produced his own version of Pop Art employing a process of accumulation to produce a style that has come to be known as California Assemblage Citing this historical albeit peripheral movement as completely autonomous full of rich narrative and the closest development to a true surrealist root in the American vernacular artist critic John Coplans went on to credit its distinct character to Berman s influence In addition to its more obvious metaphor of dissemination Berman s incidental movie role of propagation is also symbolic of the repetition and the chance effects that characterize his work In his collages and assemblages an almost cinematic recurrence structures the poetic flow of imagery allowing the varying number of individual units often loosely organized according to a grid to interconnect or function independently Language provides the principal undergirding to the associative potential of the works poetic images an unpredictable chemistry whose power is echoed in the random arrangement of Hebrew letters For Berman it is the fundamental inexhaustible assemblage of language rather than its restrictive codes that is primary Source Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 p 67 Bibliography Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 p 67 Fellows of Contemporary Art at the Otis Art Institute Gallery WALLACE BERMAN RETROSPECTIVE Exh cat Los

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/2430-untitled (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Mizrah, 1877 (date of inscription)
    creating a mirror image revealed upon unfolding the sheet Papercuts were usually mounted on a plain or colored paper background to provide a contrasting effect as seen here Although architectural features such as columns and arcades often balance the composition of papercuts the use of an imposing building as the central element as seen in this example is rare Whether the building was based on an existing or imaginary one Israel Dov Rosenbaum the creator of this extraordinary papercut made sure to include a clock at its dome possibly a hint at his profession as clockmaker to the local count in the small town of Podkamen Ukraine A Jewish community existed in Podkamen at least since the seventeenth century and by the late nineteenth century the town was home to more than a thousand Jews The elaborate design and the repeated use of thin connecting lines make this mizrah an exquisite example of its kind The creatures both mythical and real as well as the vegetal motifs and horror vacuii of this composition are typical of Eastern European art Included here are lions deer eagles and what appears to be a pair of small leopards atop the dome of the central building These four animals usually appear in Jewish papercuts to illustrate the saying Be bold as a leopard light as an eagle swift as a deer and strong as a lion to do the will of your Father who is in Heaven Ethics of the Fathers 5 23 The doubled headed eagle is often interpreted as a political symbol associated with the Russian Empire Several Eastern European artifacts in The Jewish Museum collection feature the double headed eagle including Torah shields and Hanukkah lamp as well as a mold for pastries baked for the holiday of Purim Among the mythical beasts featured in this papercut are the leviathan portrayed as a curled fish and the wild ox the legendary food of the righteous in the world to come Leviticus Rabbah 13 3 22 10 depicted in the lower register and the unicorn seen in the outer frame The interiors of wooden synagogues were often filled with elaborate animal and plant designs many having symbolic meaning Animals are also found in carved Jewish tombstones in Eastern Europe Likely more portable or readily available sources were printed books such as Hebrew primers featuring a depiction of an animal for each letter of the Hebrew alphabet or illustrated copies of the Meshal ha Kadmoni a collection of animal fables written in 1281 by the Spanish Hebrew author Isaac ibn Sahula First printed in Brescia about 1491 the work soon gained popularity and was reprinted many times including nine known Yiddish editions Many of the extant copies are embellished with illustrations mostly portraying the disputing animals who converse in biblical Hebrew and are all well versed in Jewish learning the rooster is a Bible scholar and the deer an expert in the Talmud Two pairs of roosters appear on the upper margin of

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/2460-mizrah (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Search
    with Disabilities Institutional Partnerships Talks and lectures performances hands on art making and more are designed to engage general audiences families students and educators and visitors of all abilities explore our programs About Welcome About the JM Contact Connect FAQs Rentals Located on New York City s Museum Mile the Jewish Museum is a distinctive hub for art and Jewish culture for people of all backgrounds From our unique collection to our distinctive exhibitions and dynamic education programs there is always something to see and do learn more Support Membership Individual Giving Corporate Support Planned Giving Travel Program Special Events Become a member today Individual Corporate and Foundation support are crucial to furthering the Jewish Museum s mission to collect preserve exhibit and interpret art and Jewish culture View All Memberships Shop Open today from 11 am 5 45 pm See what s on today Search 3 search results Collection 3 results Image Not Available Untitled Star of David The Peppers Ludmila Skripkina b Russia 1965 Oleg Petrenko b Russia 1964 Small Closet with Shirt Fabio Mauri Italian 1926 2009 Untitled Jew William Anastasi American b 1933 Contact Us 1109 5th Ave at 92nd St New York NY 10128 Directions 212 423 3200 info thejm org Connect With Us Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Tumblr Pinterest Join Us Members enjoy valuable benefits including free admission discounts and previews of new exhibitions while helping the Museum to celebrate and share the rich artistic and cultural heritage of the Jewish people Become a member Terms Conditions Privacy Policy Press Accessibility About This Site 2016 The Jewish Museum TheJewishMuseum Gay Block and Malka Drucker A Recontextualized Ketubbah marriage contract ow ly YiXJP pic twitter com 06JHwtcU6U If all my photographs were lost and I d be represented by just one The Steerage I d

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/search/collection?keywords=Antisemitism (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Search
    there is always something to see and do learn more Support Membership Individual Giving Corporate Support Planned Giving Travel Program Special Events Become a member today Individual Corporate and Foundation support are crucial to furthering the Jewish Museum s mission to collect preserve exhibit and interpret art and Jewish culture View All Memberships Shop Open today from 11 am 5 45 pm See what s on today Search 21 search results Collection 21 results Marriage Contract Dowry Bed Cover Napalm Man Leon Golub American 1922 2004 Untitled Cityscape Sidney Gross American 1921 1969 Marriage Contract Image Not Available Where are you Jews where are you Raphael Soyer American b Russia 1899 1987 Portrait of Vera List Larry Rivers American 1923 2002 The Altar Leonard Baskin American 1922 2000 Double Portrait Gay Flag Ross Bleckner American b 1949 Memorial Tablet and Omer Calendar Baruch Zvi Ring c 1872 1927 Landscape with Black Sun Mordecai Ardon Israeli b Poland 1896 1992 Meyer Schapiro Alice Neel American 1900 1984 Female Corpse Front View Hyman Bloom American b Latvia 1913 2009 The Dog Came and Bit the Cat El Lissitzky Russian 1890 1941 The Cat Came and Devoured the Kid El Lissitzky Russian 1890 1941 Cover El Lissitzky Russian 1890 1941 The Ox Came and Drank the Water El Lissitzky Russian 1890 1941 The Stick Came and Beat the Dog El Lissitzky Russian 1890 1941 Father Bought a Kid for Two Zuzim El Lissitzky Russian 1890 1941 Marriage Contract Eclipse of God After the Uccello Panel Called Breaking Down the Jew s Door R B Kitaj American 1932 2007 Contact Us 1109 5th Ave at 92nd St New York NY 10128 Directions 212 423 3200 info thejm org Connect With Us Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Tumblr Pinterest Join Us Members enjoy valuable benefits including

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/search/collection?keywords=Figurative (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, 1706-32
    The lamps all have tubular arms ornamented with alternating flowers and knobs or bell shaped forms reminiscent of the biblical description of the first seven branch menorah crafted during the Exodus The figure of the biblical heroine Judith is placed at top on a round platform Two features on this lamp differentiate it from the others of this type The first is the rampant lion that serves as the lower portion of the shaft The second is the introduction of color Four painted enamel roundels ornament the base containing a scene of Rebecca meeting Abraham s servant Ezekiel at the well and three episodes from the life of her son the patriarch Jacob Color is also found in the filigree flowers on the arms which are decorated in cloisonné enamel The imagery on the enamels may possibly refer to the first names of the owners presumably a couple named Rebecca and Jacob Additionally the lion on the shaft might represent their last name since German Jews frequently took their surnames from the towns in which they lived or from their houses which were named for animals or objects The Yiddish for lion is Loew or Lev However it seems unlikely that this was the owners last name since it is more commonly a man s first name and according to Dietz s genealogy of the Frankfurt Jewish community no family bore that surname in Frankfurt Alternatively the lion could simply be a support device as found on other types of objects common in seventeenth century German silver particularly standing cups The shield held by the lion is engraved with the image of a stag and a bird it is on a thin sheet of metal wedged between the lion s paws and may be a later addition These creatures could represent the names of another couple who owned the lamp Hirsch is a Yiddish name meaning deer while Feigel is a woman s name signifying a bird As shown by other lamps in the Jewish Museum collection Hanukkah lamps were sometimes given as wedding gifts and this lamp could have been presented several times during its more than two century history Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 pp 65 66 Bibliography Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 pp 114 115 Bilski Emily OBJECTS OF THE SPIRIT RITUAL AND THE ART OF TOBI KAHN Hudson Hills Press 2004 Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 pp 65 66 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 pp 65 66 Mann Vivian B A TALE OF TWO CITIES JEWISH LIFE IN FRANKFURT AND ISTANBUL 1750 1870 New York The Jewish Museum 1982 p 398 Mann Vivian B and Richard I Cohen eds FROM COURT JEWS

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/22652-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
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