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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Destruction of the Ghetto, Kiev, 1919
    Twitter Share via Email Print Artist Maker Abraham Manievich American b Russia 1881 1942 Destruction of the Ghetto Kiev 1919 Medium Oil on canvas Dimensions 70 5 8 72 1 8 in 179 4 183 2 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Purchase Gift of Deana Bezark in memory of her husband Leslie Bezark 1991 30 On View Keywords Cityscape Cubism Political Collection Area Paintings Submit Picture Request Although the Revolution of 1917 granted emancipation to the nearly six million Jews in Russia civil wars erupted soon afterward in the Ukraine accompanied by renewed anti Semitic activity Destruction of the Ghetto had its source in the pogrom of 1919 in which Manievich s son was killed With fractured planes and harsh angularity of line Manievich depicts the tumbledown building the empty streets and the abandoned synagogue of the once great Jewish community of Kiev A blazing sky forms the background all that remains in the foreground is a stray goat a symbol of the former Jewish presence Manievich was part of the international artistic avant garde of the early 20th century Like many other Jewish artist he was intimately involved with the cause of the Russian Revolution which it was hoped would bring about a renaissance of Jewish culture suppressed under the old regime The explosive cubo futurist style was appropriate to the intensity of the revolutionary period both in art and in society Although initially embraced by Lenin and the new state Manievich and other modern artists including Chagall soon found themselves ostracized by virtue of both their religion and their art Manievich emigrated in 1921 to the United States where he enjoyed critical acclaim until his death in 1942 Source The Jewish Museum New York CULTURE AND CONTINUITY THE JEWISH JOURNEY 1993 Bibliography Goodman Susan Tumarkin ed RUSSIAN JEWISH ARTISTS IN A CENTURY OF CHANGE 1890 1990 New York The Jewish Museum 1995 pp 198 199 Kampf Avram JEWISH EXPERIENCE IN THE ART OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY S Hadley Massachusettes Bergin Garvey 1984 p 114 Mann Vivian B and Emily D Bilski THE JEWISH MUSEUM NEW YORK London Scala Books 1993 p 104 Pensler Alan and Mimi Ginsberg ABRAHAM MANIEVICH Manchester Hudson Hills Press 2011 plate 50 pp 26 30 109 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Shimon Attie American b 1957 Joachim Ecke Auguststrasse Slide projection of former Jewish resident 1931 Berlin Learn More Marriage Contract Learn More Gyula Pap Hungarian 1889 1983 Seven branch Candelabrum Learn More Adolph Gottlieb American 1903 1974 Torah Ark Curtain Learn More Larry Rivers American 1923 2002 Portrait of Vera List Learn More Leonard Baskin American 1922 2000 The Altar Learn More Moshe Zabari

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/3474-destruction-of-the-ghetto-kiev (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Alms Container Alms Container of the Society for Care of the Sick, 1899-1901
    you agree to the Jewish Museum s Terms and Conditions Share Share on Facebook Share on Tumblr Share on Twitter Share via Email Print Alms Container Alms Container of the Society for Care of the Sick Designer Mogens Ballin Danish 1871 1941 Designer Siegfried Wagner Danish 1874 1952 Culture Date Copenhagen Denmark 1899 1901 Medium Pewter cast Dimensions 4 7 8 2 3 4 3 7 8 in 12 4 7 0 9 8 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Purchase Helen and Jack Cytryn Fund 2000 52 On View Keywords Charity Metalwork Collection Area Ceremonial Art Submit Picture Request Tzedakah righteousness or justice means that every Jew contributes to the community s welfare according to his or her means in order to support organizations that tend to education the needy and the ritual burial of the dead Administering to these needs is considered an obligation just as receiving help is a right Traditionally communal organizations used various objects in the performance of their duties including alms containers to collect funds This handsome Jugendstil example bears a Danish inscription across the top as well as a biblical inscription in Hebrew and Danish on the sides Happy is he who considers the poor Psalms 41 2 This type of alms container was created to replace the older containers of the Society for the Care of the Sick Tiferes Yedidim which had been founded in Copenhagen in 1821 Two Danish artists collaborated in the design of the container which was manufactured in a limited edition Jewish sculptor Siegfried Wagner 1874 1952 and painter Mogens Ballin 1871 1941 The two artists owned a pewter workshop in Copenhagen from 1899 to 1907 Ballin a Jew who converted to Catholicism as a young man studied painting at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Around 1900 he turned to pewtersmithing in his desire to produce inexpensive quality objects Source Adapted from The Jewish Museum New York CULTURE AND CONTINUITY THE JEWISH JOURNEY August 16 2007 present This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Man Ray born Emmanuel Radnitzky American 1890 1976 Untitled Self Portrait with Camera Learn More Mezuzah Cover Mezuzah Cover of Mas uda Lakhriyef Learn More Peter Blume American b Russia 1906 1992 Pig s Feet and Vinegar Learn More Thomas Sully American b England 1783 1872 Sally Etting Learn More Amy Klein Reichert American b 1959 Miriam Cup Learn More S I C Torah Finials Learn More Israel Dov Rosenbaum Mizrah Learn More ZK Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Joshua Neustein American and Israeli b Poland 1940 Weimar Series II Learn More Happy Jack born Angokwazhuk Inupiaq b Alaska c 1870 1918 New Year Greeting Learn More Man

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/27541-alms-container-alms-container-of-the-society-for-care-of-the-sick (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Circumcision Set Circumcision Set of the Torres Family, 1827 and 1866
    Museum New York Acquistion The H Ephraim and Mordecai Benguiat Family Collection S 232a i On View Keywords Birth Metalwork Collection Area Ceremonial Art Submit Picture Request The importance of circumcision in Jewish life its significance as the ceremony by which a male joins the covenant binding the House of Israel led men to specialize in this type of surgery and to train in the Jewish laws governing its execution At the very least the specialist known as a mohel circumciser owned a knife used exclusively for the ceremony He often had accessories as well a shield scissors vials for unguents and shallow bowls Sometimes the mohel commissioned illuminated manuscripts to contain the necessary prayers and to serve as a register This set of instruments and their box was commissioned by members of the Torres family during the 19th century One of the two earliest pieces the shield bears a name and date in Hebrew Jacob Nehemias Torrcs 5 587 1826 7 and a coat of arms The family crest is repeated on the lyre shaped shield which must have been made at the same time Some four decades later in 1866 the elaborate filigree box its rack and the remaining instruments were fashioned probably for another member of the family who had inherited Jacob Torres shield and vial as well as his occupation Dutch silversmiths often utilized filigree for small works such as decorative miniature household objects Therefore use of this technique was appropriate for the circumcision utensils However the extensive filigree of the larger box is unusual and lends a sense of delicacy and preciosity to the work The fineness of the materials and excellent craftsmanship demonstrates the importance placed on circumcision by the Torres family and by the Jewish community in general Source Kleeblatt Norman L and Vivian B Mann TREASURES OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York Universe Books 1986 pp 156 157 Bibliography Kleeblatt Norman L and Vivian B Mann TREASURES OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York Universe Books 1986 pp 156 157 Auctioneer is Gebr Levisson firma D Proops AUCTIONS CATALOG ENTHALTEND EINE REICHHALTIGE SAMMULUNG HEBRÄISCHER UND JÜDISCHER BÜCHER HANDSCHRIFTEN PORTRAITS U S W VORNEHMLICH AUS DEM NACHLASSE DES J D Wijnkoop Amsterdam Levisson 1911 p 99 no 2055 Skolnik Fred ed ENCYCLOPEDIA JUDAICA 2nd EDITION Gale Cengage 2006 Syme Daniel B THE JEWISH HOME A GUIDE FOR JEWISH LIVING Urj Press 2003 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Larry Rivers American 1923 2002 Portrait of Vera List Learn More Solomon Alexander Hart British 1806 1881 The Feast of the Rejoicing of the Law at the Synagogue in Leghorn Italy Learn More Robert Wilson American b 1941 The Golem Learn

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/22412-circumcision-set-circumcision-set-of-the-torres-family (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, 1920s
    and Conditions Share Share on Facebook Share on Tumblr Share on Twitter Share via Email Print Hanukkah Lamp Culture Date United States 1920s Medium Silver filigree appliqué and cast copper alloy Dimensions 21 18 1 2 9 in 53 3 47 22 9 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Gift of the Brooklyn Jewish Center 1985 5 Not On View Keywords Hanukkah Metalwork Revival styles Collection Area Ceremonial Art Submit Picture Request This oversize version of the traditional filigree lamp of eastern Europe was made in the United States It imitates the Torah ark form with its columns door complete with Torah inside and crown above Even the pattern of the filigree with its heart and oval shaped designs is based on eastern European prototypes of the first half of the nineteenth century The marks on this lamp tell a fascinating story of immigration and adaptation They appear to follow the Russian marking system but are patently false One mark is an unregistered variation on a Moscow city mark while both the Russian and American assay marks the 84 and the sterling are present Transplanted eastern European masters or sharp American businessmen used these imitation marks to convince the new immigrants either that the works were made in Russia or that the silver content was the same as that required in Russia This lamp was dedicated to the Brooklyn Jewish Center in or after 1921 the year the donor s mother died probably on the occasion of the completion of its new synagogue the same year The building located on Eastern Parkway was large and grandly decorated Serving as more than just a house of worship it was one of the earliest community centers and included a health club day school and restaurant The declining population in that area of Brooklyn eventually caused the synagogue to close its doors in 1983 Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 191 Bibliography Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 191 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 191 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Burial Plaque Learn More Adolph Gottlieb American 1903 1974 Return of the Mariner Learn More S I C Torah Finials Learn More Joel Otterson American b 1959 Hanukkah Lamp Unorthodox Menorah II Learn More Mezuzah Cover Mezuzah Cover of Mas uda Lakhriyef Learn More Jerome Liebling American 1924 2011 Butterfly Boy New York Learn More Elie Nadelman American b Poland

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/1879-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, 1868-early 20th century
    early 20th century Medium Copper alloy die stamped silver plated and appliqué Dimensions 12 3 4 9 1 2 3 5 8 in 32 4 24 1 9 1 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Gift of Dr Harry G Friedman F 1643 Not On View Keywords Hanukkah Metalwork Revival styles Collection Area Ceremonial Art Submit Picture Request The mass production of Hanukkah lamps that occurred in Germany and Austria with the popularity of the die press also spread to eastern Europe Warsaw in Congress Poland was a major center of production in the late nineteenth century a time that witnessed the rise of important factories like Fraget Norblin and Pogorzelski These various workshops produced large numbers of Jewish ceremonial objects they used similar models and even exchanged parts This assembly line production with specialization in particular backplate or appliqué designs by one or two makers was probably a cost saving device that enabled the mixing and matching of backplate and center decoration Another means of decreasing expenses was to produce the lamps in copper alloy with a silver plate finish Years of loving polishing by owners often caused the plating to wear away in places as has occurred on this example In the late nineteenth century when so many of these lamps were being made Warsaw was home to the largest Jewish community in the world Although some Jews achieved financial success in commerce banking and industry the majority were shopkeepers artisans and laborers These silver plated stamped Hanukkah lamps would have been more affordable to this populace This lamp is particularly treasured as it belonged to the mother of Dr Harry G Friedman the collector who donated most of the Hanukkah lamps in the museum s collection Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 141 Bibliography Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 141 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 141 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Jacob Koppel Gans G old s ticker Torah Ark Curtain and Valance Learn More Chana Orloff French b Ukraine 1888 1968 Portrait of Madame Peretz Hirshbein Learn More Leonard Baskin American 1922 2000 The Altar Learn More Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert American b Germany 1900 1981 Fabric Designed for Synagogue Curtains Learn More Seder Plate Tiered Seder Set Learn More Marriage Contract Learn More Tim N Gidal Israeli b Germany 1909 1996 Night of the Cabbalist Learn More Larry Rivers American 1923 2002

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/6682-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, 1756/57 (date of inscription)
    mentioned that it was found in a lot of old brass junk brought as merchandise in a vessel from Jamaica about 1850 Its previous history is unknown The silver inscription plaque on the lamp memorializes Yaakov Israel Bravo who had given it to a congregation and is dated 1756 57 The most likely place to look for the origin of this lamp is in Jamaica its first known provenance Jewish settlement in Jamaica was begun by Sephardi Jews before the British takeover in 1655 Jews prospered in the sugar and vanilla industries there as well as in international trade and one finds the name Bravo listed among the most prominent Jewish families in the eighteenth century Jewish Encyclopedia 7 66 Their origin is not stated but three members of a London Bravo family were known to have emigrated to Jamaica between 1740 and the 1770s and indeed there was considerable immigration from England an offshoot of the Amsterdam community Curaçao where there was a Sephardi community of Dutch origins and Germany In Kingston a new Sephardi synagogue Shaar Hashamayim was dedicated in 1750 The chronogram in the inscription on the lamp includes the words Shaar Hashamayim or Gate of Heaven Thus it probably refers to this new synagogue The likely reconstruction of the journey of this lamp is that it was imported from the Netherlands either via an émigré from London or possibly via Curaçao It was donated to the new synagogue around 1750 When the donor passed away in 1756 57 a silver plaque was added to the lamp that dedicated it to his memory Around one hundred years later the lamp was discarded as scrap brass and shipped to Baltimore for reasons unknown The synagogue was destroyed in a fire in 1882 so perhaps it was then and not the 1850s that the lamp was shipped to Baltimore The same type of lamp was dedicated to the Sephardi synagogue in Charlotte Amalie St Thomas in 1770 71 which demonstrates that it was used by Caribbean communities and helps support the hypothesis of Jamaican provenance There are three subtypes of this lamp group This lamp belongs to the earliest in which there are dated examples from the seventeenth to mid eighteenth century They bear the Hebrew inscription For the commandment is a lamp and the teaching is light which is no doubt also inscribed on this lamp under the silver plaque Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 pp 49 50 Bibliography Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 pp 49 50 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 pp 49 50 JEWISH ENCYCLOPEDIA New York and London Funk and Wagnalls 1906 7 66 Kayser Stephen and Guido Schoenberger eds JEWISH CEREMONIAL ART Philadelphia Jewish Publication Society of America 1959 no

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/16477-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, 1924
    Bjorn Bamberger Gift 1994 6 Not On View Keywords Art Nouveau Jugendstil Hanukkah Metalwork Collection Area Ceremonial Art Submit Picture Request The Jewish community in Denmark in existence for more than three hundred years has always been small under ten thousand people and thus ceremonial art from this country is uncommon This lamp was created by silversmith Barukh Shlomo Griegst who was born in Gardsdai Lithuania and emigrated to Denmark in 1902 His arrival coincided with a large migration of eastern European Jews fleeing the pogroms and wars of the early twentieth century Griegst had also lived in Paris Berlin and Dresden the major cultural and artistic centers of his day He worked mainly in the style of the German Art Nouveau or Jugendstil and this influence can be seen in the organic movement of many elements in the backplate design The Star of David in particular is rendered in the sinuous plant forms of Art Nouveau its interlacing lines blending with the rest of the scrollwork However there is a second influence at work in this lamp On the upper half of the backplate are lions a menorah with interlaced arms a Hebrew inscription and a scalloped top edge all of which are taken directly from a type of eastern European lamp that was made in the nineteenth century The interlaced menorah while it relates formally to Jugendstil was common on eastern European tombstones from the nineteenth century Griegst must have been very familiar with this lamp type and perhaps even owned an example to have recreated it so faithfully his Lithuanian origins would make such an association quite reasonable He has blended the traditional and the modern in a highly personal way Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 151 Bibliography Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 151 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 151 Christie s Amsterdam JUDAICA BOOKS MANUSCRIPTS WORKS OF ART AND PICTURES June 20 1990 lot 349 Christie s Amsterdam JUDAICA BOOKS MANUSCRIPTS WORKS OF ART AND PICTURES December 19 1990 lot 132 Posen Foundation Website The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization http www posenlibrary com 2015 Todd M Endelman and Zvi Gitelman ed THE POSEN LIBRARY OF JEWISH CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION VOLUME 8 Yale University Press 2016 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Otto Natzler American b Austria 1908 2007 Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Marriage Contract Learn More Eleanor Antin American b 1935

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/4614-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, first half 20th century
    8 11 1 4 2 1 2 in 42 9 28 6 6 4 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Gift of Dr Harry G Friedman F 1834 On View Keywords Hanukkah Metalwork Revival styles Collection Area Ceremonial Art Submit Picture Request This Peruvian made lamp is a close imitation of a type of Polish lamp of which there is an example in the collection from Brody dated 1787 Both pieces exhibit the multistory structure of Polish and Russian Torah arks with two columned tiers elaborate scrollwork on the sides and the curtains in front of the ark doors The balcony railing the leaping lion oil containers and even the double headed eagle on the bottom have been faithfully copied in the Peruvian lamp The South American artist has added some original touches in the form of the three dimensional lion and lion head that serve as the shamash and oil container The history of this piece is unknown and thus the circumstances of its commission remain intriguing The availability of silver in a number of Central and South American countries led to the commissioning of Jewish ceremonial art for American consumption This piece was probably intended for export since the city name of Old Cuzco is in English However there were Jewish communities in Peru beginning in the late sixteenth century and it is possible that this lamp was made for local use These first settlers consisted of conversos Sephardi Jews who were forced to convert but who secretly followed Jewish tradition Beginning in the mid nineteenth century waves of immigration came from central Europe North Africa the Ottoman Empire and finally Germany and eastern Europe these last of Jews fleeing the Nazis No community however is recorded as living in Cuzco Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 194 Bibliography Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 194 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 194 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Matthew McCaslin American b 1957 Being the Light Learn More Joel Otterson American b 1959 Hanukkah Lamp Unorthodox Menorah II Learn More David Bomberg British 1890 1957 Hear O Israel Learn More Marriage Dress The Grand Costume El keswa el kbira Learn More Jacob Koppel Gans G old s ticker Torah Ark Curtain and Valance Learn More Edouard Vuillard French 1868 1940 Lucy Hessel Reading Lucy Hessel lisant Learn More Casket Casket with Zodiac Signs and Other Motifs

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/6896-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
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