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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, 1826
    4 1 16 7 7 8 1 7 8 in 10 3 20 1 4 8 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion The Rose and Benjamin Mintz Collection M 384 Not On View Keywords Hanukkah Metalwork Neo Classicism Collection Area Ceremonial Art Submit Picture Request Bohemia and Moravia are today in the political entity known as the Czech Republic They were part of the Habsburg Empire centered in Austria from 1526 to 1918 This lamp made in Moravia bears certain features of Austrian silver lamps including an Austrian hallmark the spoon shaped oil containers and the openwork backplate However other aspects of the silverwork are more characteristic of Bohemia and Moravia The delicacy of the backplate imagery and style is a feature of Brno silver as seen for example in a Torah shield dated 1813 Other Czech features include a tendency to more diminutive forms in lamps the simple curved strips for legs and the absence of a drip pan below the oil containers Brno where this lamp was made was one of six royal cities in Moravia The rulers expelled Jews from these centers in the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries and the expulsion remained in force until 1848 after this lamp was made Despite the prohibition against living in Brno individual Jews settled illegally and by the eighteenth century they were allowed to worship in private set up a Hebrew printing press and even came to own the city bank However a full community was not established until emancipation Although the maker of this lamp is unidentified theoretically he could have been Jewish By the sixteenth century individual Jewish goldsmiths were granted privileges to work in Prague and by the seventeenth century all Bohemian Jews were allowed to practice crafts Excluded from the Christian guilds Jews of this period formed their own which later received official sanction in 1805 Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 148 Bibliography Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 148 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 148 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Matar Ishmael ha Ramhi active mid 16th early 17th century Torah Case Samaritan Torah Case Tik Learn More Peter Blume American b Russia 1906 1992 Pig s Feet and Vinegar Learn More Michael Berkowitz American b 1952 Marriage Dress Fashions for the Millennium Protective Amulet Costume Learn More Casket Casket with Zodiac Signs and Other Motifs Learn More Joshua Neustein

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/21186-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, 1867/68 (date of inscription)
    2 31 1 7 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Gift of Dr Harry G Friedman F 1267 On View Keywords Hanukkah Metalwork Revival styles Collection Area Ceremonial Art Submit Picture Request This particular type of hanging lamp with its circular scrolls buds and palmette finial was characteristic of Greece in the later nineteenth century Examples with inscriptions and provenance come from Salonika in northern Greece as well as from Corfu off the western Greek coast and from Cairo Despite the complex political history of these three places there was considerable movement of population and probably exchange of goods among them Salonika was a major port city that served as a crossroads for trade with both east and west and members of the large Jewish community often half of the total population were active as merchants and artisans From 1430 to 1912 the city was under Turkish control Corfu was ruled by Venice from 1386 until 1797 after which it was subject to France and Britain until it was annexed by Greece in 1864 Many Greek Jews fled to Corfu in the 1820s after Greek independence was achieved since they had supported the Ottoman rulers Greek Jews also settled in Egypt in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries The lamp bears a certain similarity to Italian cast scrolled lamps and the shape of the oil containers is also paralleled in some Italian examples Jews from Italy had settled in Greece beginning in the late fifteenth century and like other immigrants from Iberia Hungary North Africa and eastern Europe they maintained their own communities and synagogues In two instances the names inscribed on lamps of this type are Italian although other nationalities are represented as well Perhaps the type evolved from Italian prototypes and continued in use by descendants of Italian immigrants and eventually spread to the larger Jewish population Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 150 Bibliography Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 150 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 150 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Marc Chagall French b Belorussia 1887 1985 Untitled Old Man with Beard Learn More Wallace Berman American 1926 1976 Untitled Learn More Harley Swedler American b Canada 1962 Mezuzah in Case Beron Mezuzah Learn More ZK Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Abraham Shulkin American b Russia 1852 1918 Torah Ark Torah Ark from Adath Yeshurun Synagogue Learn More James Jacques Joseph Tissot French 1836

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/6254-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, 1661-90
    Museum New York Acquistion Gift of Mrs Albert A List JM 14 70 Not On View Keywords Baroque Hanukkah Metalwork Collection Area Ceremonial Art Submit Picture Request The earliest silver Hanukkah lamp known in Germany is most likely this simple chest form A version with a vaulted lid appeared later around 1700 through 1775 All but one of these chest form lamps with identifiable marks were made in Frankfurt Jews had lived in Frankfurt since at least the Middle Ages and by the time this lamp was made had been confined to a ghetto for several centuries A maximum of 500 families were allowed residence in the ghetto Some Jews had achieved considerable wealth and one can surmise that this lamp was commissioned for one such well to do resident The large number of Hanukkah lamps created by Frankfurt silversmiths suggests that Jewish community members were important patrons and in fact documentary evidence indicates that active patronage of Christian silversmiths went back to at least the sixteenth century Several silversmiths such as Rötger Herfurth and Georg Wilhelm Schedel seem to have catered to an almost exclusively Jewish clientele since almost all of their known works are Jewish ceremonial objects The only ornamented portions of the lamp are the spouts that held the wicks which are in the shape of fish s heads and the paw shaped feet This simplicity could reflect the influence of the undecorated style one of the trends in early Baroque decorative arts of the second half of the seventeenth century Alternatively it could result from the economic means of the purchaser The inspiration for this form can only be conjectured A related secular object type from this period was the box shaped inkstand and in fact an example made in England in 1717 with flat lid no decoration and pull out drawer on the bottom seems remarkably similar in design Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 62 Bibliography Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 62 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 62 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Torah Shield Learn More Heinrich Wilhelm Kompff active 1783 1825 Torah Finials Learn More Johann Adam Boller 1679 1732 master 1706 Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Shimon Attie American b 1957 Joachim Ecke Auguststrasse Slide projection of former Jewish resident 1931 Berlin Learn More Matthew McCaslin American b 1957 Being the Light Learn More Peter Blume American b Russia 1906

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/16610-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, 19th-early 20th century
    Keywords Hanukkah Islamic Art Metalwork Collection Area Ceremonial Art Submit Picture Request This lamp belongs to a cast group made in the Atlas Mountains whose surface is ornamented with vinework executed in thick raised lines The enamel that fills the voids left by the raised decoration is a rare survival on Moroccan Hanukkah lamps it is typical of work in the Central Anti Atlas Mountains found for example on rifles and daggers of the nineteenth century Lamps with similar open scrollwork containing two kidney shaped spaces in the center were also made in Italy and eastern Europe where they had different finials and there were generally no birds The origin of the type has been attributed to fifteenth century Italy but such an early date requires further documentation Connections between North Africa and Italy were strong from the seventeenth century on particularly with Livorno Jews from that community came to live in nearby Algeria and Tunisia and Livornese Jews controlled Algerian trade Italian Jews were also found in eastern Europe having arrived in Poland and Lithuania after major disruptions further west in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries In turn Polish Jews were important in trade with Venice from the fifteenth century on These interconnections between Italy and North Africa on the one hand and Italy and eastern Europe on the other suggest mechanisms by which this scrolled lamp form might have attained such a disparate distribution A number of distinctly Moroccan features have been added to transform this lamp into an Islamic type the two birds the arabesques covering every inch of the surface the horseshoe arch in the center and the oil containers which consist of four large wells with two spouts each Other versions of this type with different surface decoration were found in the northern Atlas Mountains further to the west in such cities as Demnat indicating the wider distribution of the form Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 159 Bibliography Baskin Judith R ed and Kenneth Seeskin ed THE CAMBRIDGE GUIDE TO JEWISH HISTORY RELIGION AND CULTURE Cambridge Cambridge University Press 2010 Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 159 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 159 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Max Weber American b Russia 1881 1961 Sabbath Learn More Solomon Alexander Hart British 1806 1881 The Feast of the Rejoicing of the Law at the Synagogue in Leghorn Italy Learn More Mordecai Ardon Israeli

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/7607-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, 1757 (date of inscription)
    Frankfurt a M The date of 1757 is consistent with the Rococo style of the lamp with its rocaille edges and asymmetrical finial Jacob Juda Bing is known from Klaus Dietz s genealogical study of the Jewish community of Frankfurt where there is a mention of him in 1762 and a death date of 1798 Bing belonged to a Levite family that was first documented in Frankfurt in 1634 when his grandfather Isaak of Bingen married and was granted right of residence in the city Since 1462 the Jews of Frankfurt had been confined to a walled in ghetto the Judengasse Housing could not expand beyond the walls and by the seventeenth century when Bing s grandfather arrived the number of residents was strictly regulated Mirrored Hanukkah lamps are very rare probably due to the fact that until the eighteenth century glass mirrors were quite expensive to make Large mirrors were so prized that they were often given as gifts from one monarch to another By the eighteenth century domestic markets for mirrors increased in places like Germany but it was not until the nineteenth century that two labor saving inventions made mirrors more widely available These innovations consisted of a chemical means of silvering the glass and a special furnace that speeded up the glass melting process It is therefore remarkable that the original owner of this lamp was able to afford it The use of mirrors on Hanukkah lamps served to intensify greatly the brilliance of the lights and parallels the use of mirrored backplates on secular wall sconces The engraved decoration found on the Jewish Museum lamp seems to have been a specialty of Italian mirror makers as many examples were produced there in the eighteenth century Italian glassmakers worked throughout Europe bringing their skills and techniques with them and so this piece could certainly have been made in Germany which was one of the major mirror producing countries Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 pp 72 73 Bibliography Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 pp 72 73 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 pp 72 73 Kanof Abram JEWISH CEREMONIAL ART AND RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCE New York Harry N Abrams 1969 no 171 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Jan Pogorzelski active before 1851 c 1910 Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Sol LeWitt American 1928 2007 Wall Drawing 926 Loopy yellow and purple Learn More Happy Jack born Angokwazhuk Inupiaq b Alaska

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/17516-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Torah Mantle, 1771/72
    Picture Request Although the Talmud 250 500 C E mentions the use of beautiful silks to wrap the Torah scroll Sabbath 133b the form that these coverings took is unknown Our earliest knowledge of their shape comes from late medieval manuscript illuminations A depiction to the synagogue on the eve of Passover in the Sarajevo Haggadah a 14th century Hebrew manuscript from Spain shows a member of the congregation closing the Torah ark Within are scrolls dressed in mantles whose hems flare outward to form a skirt Sephardic Jews continued to use mantles of this distinctive form wherever they traveled after their expulsion from Spain in 1492 to Holland Turkey Italy and other countries According to its inscription this example was dedicated by Asher Anshil son of Abraham Schoehoff Andries Abraham Schoelhoff and his wife Havah Hevi daughter of Wolf Reintel Eva Benjamin de Joseph Both the donor and his father in law served as parnassim officials of the Amsterdam Jewish community The final line of the inscription is a chronogram for the year 1771 2 May I wholeheartedly follow Your laws Ps 199 80 The fruit of the righteous is a tree of life Prov 11 30 Eighteenth century French brocade forms the major portion of the mantle The use of expensive imported materials is characteristic of textiles made for the Torah and signifies the reverence in which the sacred Scriptures are held What distinguishes this mantle is its complex iconographic program largely embroidered on an inset panel of red velvet that forms the front Two themes are presented One derives from a saying in the Ethics of the Fathers There are three crowns the crown of Torah the crown of priesthood and the crown of royalty 4 17 Three appliqué crowns embroidered in silk and metallic threads illustrate this maxim two on the front and the third on the back The second theme implicit in the representation of two symbols of the ancient Temple the menorah or seven branched candelabrum and the table of shewbread below the dedicatory inscription is the belief in the coming of the Messianic Age and the rebuilding of the Temple in Jerusalem Its inclusion links the decoration of this mantle with the more extensive Temple iconography of eighteenth century Torah curtains and valances Source Adapted from Kleeblatt Norman L Dr Vivian B Mann TREASURES OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 1986 pp 106 107 Bibliography Kirshenblatt Gimblett Barbara FABRIC OF JEWISH LIFE New York The Jewish Museum 1977 p 54 Kleeblatt Norman L Dr Vivian B Mann TREASURES OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 1986 pp 106 107 Mann Vivian B and Emily D Bilski THE JEWISH MUSEUM NEW YORK London Scala Books 1993 pp 48 49 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/22341-torah-mantle (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, 18th to mid-19th century
    the symmetrical arrangement of the columns door and window is not characteristic of the synagogues in question In actuality the architectural elements seem to have been derived from several different prototypes combining west and east rural and urban brick and wood The overhanging roofs supported by columns above the central door and the arched gallery above were characteristic features of wooden homes in Poland for example in the city of Cracow The distinctively shaped window above the doorway which consists of an oval with two squared extensions was characteristic of various eastern European log built structures including church belfries This kind of window is also found in a Jewish context over the doors of a baroque style Torah ark in the synagogue of Zamosc in western Galicia This was probably based on Baroque architectural models in which oval windows were arranged above arched doors as in the early eighteenth century Belvedere Castle in Vienna By contrast the presence of birds possibly storks and the occasional snake on the roofs suggests an East European model They may derive from the carved ridge poles of Polish Russian wooden structures or from Polish folklore The stork was highly esteemed and believed to be a kindred spirit of humans A household upon whose roof a pair of storks chose to nest was considered blessed with good fortune and if a public building such as a church was chosen the whole community shared in the good luck In sum it appears that these lamps may have been attempting to depict a Baroque structure either a home or a synagogue with elements added from local architecture such as the overhanging roofs galleries and birds Only one dated example of this type has been published and it is also the only example with a known provenance It is a lamp from the synagogue of Buczaczu in Galicia and dated 1823 Further evidence of dating and origin of this type is present in the birds with their turned back heads and pointed wings These are quite similar to those on a cast hanging lamp from the Ukraine dated to the second half of the eighteenth century Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 pp 126 127 Bibliography Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 pp 126 127 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 pp 126 127 Kayser Stephen S and Guido Schoenberger eds JEWISH CEREMONIAL ART A GUIDE TO THE APPRECIATION OF ART OBJECTS USED IN SYNAGOGUE AND HOME PRINCIPALLY FROM THE COLLECTIONS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM OF THE JEWISH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OF AMERICA 2nd rev ed Philadelphia Jewish Publication Society of America 1959 no 136 p 130 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/8266-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Silent Prayer, Synagogue of Amsterdam, “The Amidah”, 1897
    the eminent critic Théophile Gautier No doubt this acclaim encouraged Brandon s continued interest in the depiction of life in the synagogue The artist received his formal education at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris He followed artistic routes typical for many emancipated Jews in the last century before he turned to his preoccupation with contemporary Jewish life Bran don s career began pragmatically with the production of paintings with Christian subjects so much in demand during the period of prosperity and superficial piety that marked the reign of Napoleon III in France His paintings of the life of St Bridget exhibited in the Salon of 1861 brought him a commission to decorate the oratory dedicated to the same female saint in Rome two years later The Kiss of the Mother of Moses exhibited in the Salon of 1866 seems to serve as a bridge between Brandon s Christian themes and his Jewish ones It demonstrates his ability to bring a fresh approach to routine subjects from the Hebrew Bible a likely indication of his awareness of the English Pre Raphaelite s rejection of these hackneyed subjects In addition to his regular entries in the Salons Brandon also participated in the historic 1874 exhibition held in the studio of the photographer Nadar This is now remembered as the first Impressionist exhibition Because his works of the late 1860s and 1870s display none of the lightness of tonality that shares stylistic and ideological affinities with the Impressionists he did not show in their later exhibitions The late work discussed here however demonstrates a clarity and a concern for the effects of light that betray an ultimate influence of Impressionism on Brandon Silent Prayer was composed in the artist s studio at Rouen from numerous studies made on site One of these studies is in The Jewish Museum collection and clearly shows a difference in vantage point from the finished work As writing or drawing in any form are prohibited under Jewish law on Sabbath or holidays the very moments so many of his works record it is unlikely that Brandon made studies from direct observation at these times The Portuguese Synagogue of Amsterdam is one of the earliest most impressive and beautifully appointed synagogues in Europe It was constructed between 1671 and 1675 and still remains one of Amsterdam s landmarks The new structure met with both praise and criticism from Amsterdam s extensive Dutch Reformed community Brandon was certainly not the only artist to record his impression of this noteworthy interior The best known artistic representation of the synagogue found in Emanuel de Witte s famous 17th century depiction is now a treasure of the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam The synagogue s stately exterior and interior also prompted numerous popular 17th and 18th century prints Source Kleeblatt Norman L and Vivian B Mann TREASURES OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York Universe Books 1986 pp 162 163 Bibliography Goodman Susan Tumarkin et al THE EMERGENCE OF JEWISH ARTISTS IN NINETEENTH CENTURY EUROPE

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/34206-silent-prayer-synagogue-of-amsterdam-the-amidah (2016-02-14)
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