archive-org.com » ORG » T » THEJEWISHMUSEUM.ORG

Total: 1991

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Kaddish, 2001
    Image not available for download Images of artworks that the Museum believes to be in the public domain PD are available to download on this site Other images may be protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights By using any of these images you agree to the Jewish Museum s Terms and Conditions Share Share on Facebook Share on Tumblr Share on Twitter Share via Email Print Artist Maker Bette Blank American b 1940 Kaddish 2001 Medium Oil on composition board Dimensions 24 36 in 61 91 4 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Gift of Mr and Mrs Stuart Blank in Memory of Barbara and Meyer Perlberg 2004 55 Not On View Keywords Community Families Folk Self Taught Collection Area Paintings Submit Picture Request In Kaddish Bette Blank turns the imagined double funeral of her maternal grandparents Meyer and Barbara Perlberg into a celebratory family portrait All the Perlberg descendants are recognizably depicted in this visual genealogy including the artist herself who holds a red rose her aunt Jeanne who embraces her cello and her cousin Henry with his bicycle The title refers to the text exalting God traditionally recited by mourners portions of which appear in English and Hebrew With a Ph D in engineering Bette Blank pursued a career as a scientist and college teacher of chemistry and physics while studying art at various schools and developing her painting style Although she learned the traditional pictorial techniques she rejects linear perspective and prefers the freedom of following her own system of spatial representation for her narratives Her stated goal in painting is to have the viewer accompany me on a visual and emotional trip through my house my garden and my life experiences Source The Jewish Musuem New York INNER REALITIES SELF TAUGHT ARTISTS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM COLLECTION September 2 October 23 2005 Provenance the artist until 2004 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Anni Albers American b Germany 1899 1994 Six Prayers Learn More Nan Goldin American b 1953 Self Portrait in blue bathroom London Learn More Casket Casket with Zodiac Signs and Other Motifs Learn More Ilse Bing American b Germany 1899 1998 New York Me and the Elevated Learn More Ben Shahn American b Lithuania 1898 1969 New York Learn More David Bomberg British 1890 1957 Hear O Israel Learn More Torah Shield Learn More Fabio Mauri Italian 1926 2009 Small Closet with Shirt Learn More Spice Container Learn More Burial Plaque Learn More Anni Albers American b Germany 1899 1994 Six Prayers Learn More Nan Goldin American b 1953 Self Portrait in blue bathroom London Learn More Casket Casket with Zodiac Signs and Other

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/29818-kaddish (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Shulie Painting His Portrait, 2010
    Shulie 1997 is a shot by shot remake of an obscure documentary about radical 60s feminist Shulamith Firestone Author of the treatise The Dialectic of Sex The Case for Feminist Revolution Firestone was a student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1967 when four male directors selected her as a subject for a film about the so called Now Generation Shot in the style of direct cinema the original Shulie features Firestone discussing the limitations of motherhood as well as racial and class issues in the workplace The directors also filmed her enduring a humiliating critique by her art school professors Thirty years later filmmaker Elisabeth Subrin recreated the Shulie using actors in many of the original locations The resulting film is a nostalgic and somewhat cynical reflection on the legacy of second wave feminism Subrin writes In the compulsion to remake to produce a fake document to repeat a specific experience I never actually had what I have offered up is the performance of a resonant repetitive emotional trauma that has yet to be healed The exhibition includes four new enlarged film stills from Shulie These color photographs not only allow the viewer to focus on thematic details of the protagonist s activities commuting to work creating art but also formal details including 16mm film grain and video scanlines Similar to the way Subrin s film inhabits the fuzzy area between reality and fantasy her highly mediated printing methods involve a complex layering of analog and digital techniques Elisabeth Subrin s films have screened widely in the US and abroad including solo exhibitions at The Museum of Modern Art and The Institute of Contemporary Art Boston and in group shows including The Whitney Biennial The Guggenheim Museum The Walker Art Center and The Wexner Center for the Arts Source The Jewish Museum New York SHULIE FILM AND STILLS BY ELISABETH SUBRIN September 12 2010 January 30 2011 Provenance the artist from 2010 Sue Scott Gallery New York New York until 2010 sold to TJM The Jewish Museum This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Shulie 1997 article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Elisabeth Subrin American b 1964 Shulie Photographing Trash Learn More Elisabeth Subrin American b 1964 Shulie Speaking Learn More Elisabeth Subrin American b 1964 Shulie Looking Back Learn More Elisabeth Subrin American b 1964 Shulie Photographing Trash Learn More Elisabeth Subrin American b 1964 Shulie Speaking Learn More Elisabeth Subrin American b 1964 Shulie Looking Back Learn More Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/34221-shulie-painting-his-portrait (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Marriage Contract, 1733
    On View Keywords Marriage Collection Area Ceremonial Art Submit Picture Request Marriage is one of the most important mitzvot or commandments in Judaism and Scriptures are replete with verses encouraging the union of man and woman One of the essential elements of a Jewish wedding ceremony is the writing and transfer of a marriage contract or ketubbah plural ketubbot The ketubbah was originally formulated to protect a woman s rights in marriage by establishing the financial obligations of the groom toward his bride in cases of divorce or death Jews expelled from Spain and Portugal at the end of the 15th century brought the tradition of decorating the ketubbah marriage contract to the lands where they settled including Italy Holland England North Africa and the Ottoman Empire The practice flourished in Italy where there was a long tradition of decorating documents and where reading the ketubbah aloud during the marriage ceremony became popular in the 16th century The decoration of a ketubbah was not only an embellishment but was included also for practical reasons A major concern of Spanish rabbis was that no changes be made to the provisions of the ketubbot after they were signed Italian ketubbot stem predominantly from the northern part of the country with a few examples from central Italy since Jews had been expelled from other regions before the form became popular Written in parchment they usually feature lavish ornamentation inspired by both Jewish and Christian art During the 18th century decorations ranging from biblical scenes to the signs of the zodiac became so extravagant that rabbis enacted laws limiting expenditures on marriage contracts This beautiful example comes from the city of Verona where Jewish settlement may date to as early as the Roman period Above the text within a shield topped by a portrait of a man with a feathery headdress are the coats of arms at left a squirrel perched against a fruit tree symbol of the D Italia family of printers to which the bride belonged at right the zodiac sign of Pisces within a Star of David for the groom Affluent Italian Jewish families often adopted an unofficial coat of arms in imitation of local nobility On the contract the amount stipulated to be paid by the husband or his heirs in case of divorce or death is half the customary amount since the bride was a widow Source Adapted from Nahson Claudia J KETUBBOT MARRIAGE CONTRACTS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM San Francisco Pomegranate 1998 p 27 Bibliography Nahson Claudia J KETUBBOT MARRIAGE CONTRACTS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM San Francisco Pomegranate 1998 p 27 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Michael Berkowitz American b 1952 Marriage

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/20380-marriage-contract (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Johannesburg, 2nd Greatest City after Paris; Monument; Mine; Sobriety, Obesity and Growing Old, 1989-91
    was involved in the Mandela trials The four animated films Johannesburg 2nd Greatest City after Paris Monument Mine and Sobriety Obesity and Growing Old are the first in Kentridge s Drawings for Projection series Each revolves around two central characters Soho Eckstein and Felix Teitelbaum who at first appear to be alter egos as they play out contradictory moral positions of white South Africans In all four short animated films Eckstein the voracious ruthless self indulgent industrialist is shown as a stocky tyrant in his tight fitting pinstripe suit worn as a uniform This character contrasts with Teitelbaum the artist dreamer who is disarmingly characterized as tentative circumspect and vulnerable In fact physically Teitelbaum is a self portrait of Kentridge and Eckstein is a portrait of the artist s grandfather Together these two Jewish antagonists play out the uncomfortable irony of a white Jewish minority in its privileged position in a racist society In the first three of these films we see Eckstein amassing power and wealth at the expense of black South Africans who are essentially reduced to slave labor Eckstein indulges his appetites disregards his wife abuses his workers and devastates the South African landscape While the thoughtful Felix wins the heart of Mrs Eckstein in Sobriety Obesity and Growing Old she returns to her husband the first instance in the continuing series where Eckstein begins to show pangs of remorse Magical best describes the way Kentridge transforms the animate into the inanimate and vice versa the way he morphs objects people and landscapes Terrifying best expresses what they represent The bleeding wounded and dead melt into the South African landscape a cat turns into an atavistic stamping machine its tail into the handle a plunger coffee pot transforms into a pneumatic tube that descends hundreds of feet down a mine shaft a microphone metamorphoses into a sprinkler In subsequent films in the series the two antagonists begin to take on each other s characteristics and morph into each other Evidently the collapsing together of the virtuous and the malevolent results from Kentridge s feeling that there are neither heroes nor innocents in the physical and social devastation that embodied apartheid South Africa but only victims Kentridge s animation technique is unique but simple he calls his process Stone Age Capitalizing on his masterful draftsmanship he creates large scale charcoal drawings that he films in their process of transformation Kentridge makes images and then erases them on the same sheet of paper every day creating scores of changes to propel the visual narrative His erasures leave traces of past images that contribute to the moody depictions and infuse them with a melancholic sense of lased time This method drawing filming erasing and drawing anew is a way of thinking a means of writing a method of questioning Kentridge s drawings and films become metaphors communal national and personal that remain purposefully stranded at the intersection where memory meets history Source Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/27590-johannesburg-2nd-greatest-city-after-paris-monument-mine-sobriety-obe (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, 18th century (?)
    Dr Harry G Friedman F 2125 Not On View Keywords Hanukkah Metalwork Renaissance Collection Area Ceremonial Art Submit Picture Request This lamp is the finest and most elaborate example of a group in the form of round arches supported by columns These architectural elements are cast and applied to a backplate of sheet metal The round arch originated in ancient Greek architecture during the Renaissance Filippo Brunelleschi revived the principles of classical architecture The balustrade on the bench of the lamp which would have held the oil containers is also in Renaissance style The inspiration for the use of this architectural form on a Hanukkah lamp could possibly have been the Renaissance tabernacle frame These wooden frames consisting of a round arch supported by elaborate columns were designed to hold religious images for private devotion particularly in the fifteenth century Instead of icons the arches on the earliest versions of wall hung Hanukkah lamps have only plain reflective sheets of metal The round arch continued to be used in buildings more or less through the nineteenth century and so it is often difficult to determine the date of the lamps from architectural comparison alone The examples in the collection all have sand cast arches and columns suggesting post Renaissance dates perhaps as early as the eighteenth century when at least one sand cast lamp in Italian style is known Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 106 Bibliography Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 106 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 106 Kayser Stephen and Guido Schoenberger eds JEWISH CEREMONIAL ART Phildadelphia Jewish Publication Society of America 1959 no 123 Kleeblatt Norman L and Vivian B Mann TREASURES OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York Universe Books 1986 pp 66 67 Mann Vivian B ed GARDENS AND GHETTOS THE ART OF JEWISH LIFE IN ITALY Berkeley and Los Angeles University of California Press 1989 p 291 Provenance R Stora by 1948 sold to Friedman Dr Harry G Friedman until 1948 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Weegee born Arthur Fellig American b Poland 1899 1968 Max Is Rushing in the Bagels to a Restaurant on Second Avenue for the Morning Trade Learn More Joel Otterson American b 1959 Hanukkah Lamp Unorthodox Menorah II Learn More Quilt Learn More Tina Barney American b 1945 The Trustee and The Curator Learn More Marriage Contract Learn More Abraham Shulkin American b Russia 1852 1918 Torah Ark

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/7220-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, 16th century
    Copper alloy lost wax cast Dimensions 4 1 2 8 3 16 2 1 16 in 11 4 20 8 5 3 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Gift of the Mr and Mrs Albert A List Family JM 100 73 On View Keywords Hanukkah Metalwork Renaissance Collection Area Ceremonial Art Submit Picture Request This lamp is made from the lost wax process and therefore probably dates to the Renaissance The crenellations across the top were derived from medieval architecture seen for example in the fourteenth century Palazzo Vecchio in Florence Their use on Hanukkah lamps goes back at least to the fifteenth century when they were depicted on a lamp in an Italian Hebrew manuscript A similar backplate form with its rectangular shape and crenellations above is found on other Italian Hanukkah lamps with different imagery One type is decorated with a scene of two centaurs carrying off nymphs and represents a copy of a writing box plaque from Padua dated around 1500 to which the crenellations were added This suggests that a few Italian backplates may have been cast from parts of secular objects or else copied from them However it is not clear when these lamps were made and as extant examples are poor castings they may have been produced considerably after the Renaissance Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 104 Bibliography B nai B rith TRADITIONAL CEREMONIAL OBJECTS AND JEWISH FOLD ART FROM THE JOSEPH B AND OLYN HORWITZ JUDAICA COLLECTION CLEVELAND OHIO Exh cat Washington D C Klutznick Exhibit Hall B nai B rith Building 1969 pp 19 20 Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 104 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 104 Reader s Digest READER S COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE BIBLE Pleasantville NY Reader s Digest Association 1998 Rush Barbara THE LIGHTS OF HANUKKA A BOOK OF MENORAHS Stewart Tabori and Chang 2003 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Bezalel School Rug Learn More Abraham Shulkin American b Russia 1852 1918 Torah Ark Torah Ark from Adath Yeshurun Synagogue Learn More Tim N Gidal Israeli b Germany 1909 1996 Night of the Cabbalist Learn More John Ruslen active 1656 c 1715 Presentation Tray Lord Mayor s Tray Learn More Seder Plate Tiered Seder Set Learn More James Jacques Joseph Tissot French 1836 1902 Adam and Eve Driven From Paradise Learn More Elie Nadelman American b Poland 1882 1946 Dancer Learn More Boris

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/15483-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Mortar, 1605
    Artist Maker Joseph de Levis 1552 1611 14 Culture Date Verona Italy 1605 Medium Bronze cast Dimensions 5 1 2 6 15 16 in 14 16 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Gift of Barbara and Benjamin Zucker in honor of Jean and Alfred Moldovan 2005 7 On View Keywords Metalwork Renaissance Collection Area Decorative Arts Submit Picture Request Although the names of other Jewish artists of the Italian Renaissance are known Joseph de Levis is the only one to have left a recognizable body of work He and his brother both bronze casters in Verona had a workshop that was later joined by their sons Most of the pieces made by the de Levises were for general use in the home or in churches bells mortars andirons and the like The few pieces with Jewish symbols or characters such as a mortar with a menorah and a Hanukkah lamp with the figures of Judith Holofernes and Hasmoneans were made by Joseph or his nephew Servo 1570 1616 27 both of whom remained Jewish while all the other family members in the shop were baptized Another indication of Joseph s Jewish loyalty is his signature on this and all other works Joseph de Levis instead of the usual Italian name Giuseppe Jews avoided the latter name because of its Christian associations On one side of this mortar is a medallion imitating a Roman coin with the profile of a crowned male head During the Renaissance men and women of culture sought to re create Roman art forms and style among them the antique coins struck by the emperors Another Renaissance characteristic is the use of bronze which became a popular medium for sculpture both large scale and small and for decorative arts such as this mortar The band of decoration that combines leaves and harpies is typical of the period Source Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven Yale University Press 2004 p 170 Bibliography Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven Yale University Press 2004 p 170 Mann Vivan ed GARDENS AND GHETTOS THE ART OF JEWISH LIFE IN ITALY Berkeley University of California Press 1989 p 290 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Nancy Spero American 1926 2009 Masha Bruskina Learn More Johann Valentin Schüler 1650 1720 master 1680 Sabbath Festival Lamp Learn More Fabio Mauri Italian 1926 2009 Small Closet with Shirt Learn More Mezuzah Cover Mezuzah Cover of Mas uda Lakhriyef Learn More Bezalel School Rug Learn More Amy Klein Reichert American b 1959 Miriam Cup Learn More Reuven Rubin Israeli b Romania 1893 1974 Goldfish Vendor Learn More Tim N

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/3883-mortar (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, 18th-19th century (?)
    be protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights By using any of these images you agree to the Jewish Museum s Terms and Conditions Share Share on Facebook Share on Tumblr Share on Twitter Share via Email Print Hanukkah Lamp Culture Date Italy 18th 19th century Medium Copper alloy cast and hand worked Dimensions 7 3 4 9 3 16 2 3 4 in 19 7 23 4 7 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion The H Ephraim and Mordecai Benguiat Family Collection S 113 Not On View Keywords Baroque Hanukkah Metalwork Collection Area Ceremonial Art Submit Picture Request In contrast to the sculptural Italian cast lamps with their Renaissance images of humans and mythical creatures another group of cast lamps exhibits flat unornamented surfaces and scrollwork designs An Italian origin is suggested by the fact that the oil wells are Italianate in form round bowls with long spouts In addition the one example of this type with provenance is located in a synagogue in Modena A variant of this type in the Wolfson Museum bears an inscription date of 1622 23 which appears to have been a late addition Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 112 Bibliography Adler Cyrus Immanuel Moses Casanowicz and Ephraim Benguiat DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE OF A COLLECTION OF OBJECTS OF JEWISH CEREMONIAL DEPOSITED IN THE U S NATIONAL MUSEUM BY HADJI EPHRAIM BENGUIT Report of U S National Museum 1899 p 549 Adler Cyrus and Immanuel Moses Casanowicz The Collection of Jewish Ceremonial Objects in the United States National Museum PROCEEDINGS OF THE U S NATIONAL MUSEUM Vol 34 no 1630 Washington U S Government Print 1908 p 727 Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 112 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 112 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert American b Germany 1900 1981 Passover Set Learn More Tim N Gidal Israeli b Germany 1909 1996 Night of the Cabbalist Learn More Jacques Lipchitz American and French b Lithuania 1891 1973 The Sacrifice Learn More ZK Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Bezalel School Rug Learn More Salom Italia 1619 after 1655 Esther Scroll Learn More Burial Inscription Learn More Jerome Liebling American 1924 2011 Butterfly Boy New York Learn More Sol LeWitt American 1928 2007 Wall Drawing 926 Loopy yellow and purple Learn More Jan Pogorzelski active before 1851 c 1910 Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert American b Germany 1900

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/21806-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive



  •