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  • The Jewish Museum - Search
    4 000 years of history explore the collection Programs Talks Performances Group Visits Families Teens Pre K 12 Educators Visitors with Disabilities Institutional Partnerships Talks and lectures performances hands on art making and more are designed to engage general audiences families students and educators and visitors of all abilities explore our programs About Welcome About the JM Contact Connect FAQs Rentals Located on New York City s Museum Mile the Jewish Museum is a distinctive hub for art and Jewish culture for people of all backgrounds From our unique collection to our distinctive exhibitions and dynamic education programs there is always something to see and do learn more Support Membership Individual Giving Corporate Support Planned Giving Travel Program Special Events Become a member today Individual Corporate and Foundation support are crucial to furthering the Jewish Museum s mission to collect preserve exhibit and interpret art and Jewish culture View All Memberships Shop Open today from 11 am 5 45 pm See what s on today Search 1 search results Collection 1 results Torah Scroll Contact Us 1109 5th Ave at 92nd St New York NY 10128 Directions 212 423 3200 info thejm org Connect With Us Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Tumblr Pinterest Join Us Members enjoy valuable benefits including free admission discounts and previews of new exhibitions while helping the Museum to celebrate and share the rich artistic and cultural heritage of the Jewish people Become a member Terms Conditions Privacy Policy Press Accessibility About This Site 2016 The Jewish Museum TheJewishMuseum Gay Block and Malka Drucker A Recontextualized Ketubbah marriage contract ow ly YiXJP pic twitter com 06JHwtcU6U If all my photographs were lost and I d be represented by just one The Steerage I d be satisfied Stieglitz pic twitter com IYhhxFTL2L Today is your last chance to

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/search/collection?keywords=Worship%20and%20Ritual (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Untitled (Old Man with Beard), c. 1931
    watercolor over charcoal or graphite on paper Dimensions 24 1 4 19 in 61 6 48 3 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Gift of Frances Gershwin Godowsky and family in memory of George Gershwin 1999 77 Copyright 2014 Artists Rights Society ARS New York ADAGP Paris Not On View Keywords Figurative Collection Area Works on Paper Submit Picture Request Old Man with Beard depicts the outsize figure of a Jew standing alone in a snowy landscape before the backdrop of a Russian village No one else can be seen and there is not even a human footprint on the ground The head is framed in the center of the canvas by the houses of the village Wearing a Russian visored cap and dark caftan the figure projects an aura of meditation The depiction of a religious Jew derives from Chagall s store of images of Russian shtetl life But the image is generalized and timeless without iconographic specificity and is rendered with a modernist vocabulary fused with folkloric elements and an odd disjunction of figure and houses behind The remarkable dominance of the figure in the space the tilt of the head the hand gesture and the houses that frame the head suggest that the artist continued to make use of various stylistic devices that he had employed previously Although this painting was created long after Chagall s departure from the Soviet Union in 1922 his fantasy world was occupied with the ordinary figures of Vitebsk The old man with the beard in The Jewish Museum painting is a subject derived from one of the poor Jews whom he saw in Russia and used as models for his cycle of Old Jews As Chagall states in My Life his models were old beggars or itinerant Hasidic rabbis From chance encounters with beggars peddlers and itinerant Jewish preachers Chagall conjures up the eternal figure of the migrant rabbis and Jewish miracle workers so prevalent in Eastern European Jewish communities Often they were wandering Jews filled with holy inspiration proclaiming the word of God and they seemed to resonate with a spiritual radiance In Old Man with Beard we are aware that the figure is not employed merely as an actor in a scene Rather the singular nature of the figure allows us to experience his profound humanity Source Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 pp 52 53 Bibliography Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 pp 52 53 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Joan Snyder American b 1940 Hard Sweetness Learn More Torah Case Finials

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/5497-untitled-old-man-with-beard (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Torah Finials, 1797-99
    9 5 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Purchase Gift of Dr Harry G Friedman by exchange Judaica Acquisitions Fund and Frances and Hubert J Brandt Gift 1999 107a b On View Keywords Metalwork Torah ornaments Collection Area Ceremonial Art Themes Torah Submit Picture Request In a publication of 1931 this pair of finials rimmonim is described as being in one of the two Kassel synagogues Nothing is known of their whereabouts from Kristallnacht 1938 until 1970 when the finials were purchased from a dealer According to their inscriptions the finials were a donation of Rabbi Zelig son of Rabbi Feis of blessed memory for the Torah scroll of the Benevolent Society in the year 5 559 1798 99 This inscription appears along the circular bases that were probably added to the finials shortly before they were purchased Similar bases appear on a pair of finials in the form of a column topped by a flaming urn This inscription indicates a practice known from rabbinic responsa that individuals and communal societies often owned their own Torah scrolls and ornaments which they deposited in the synagogue for their use on special occasions The remaining inscriptions appear on the column bases It is a tree of life to them that grasp it Proverbs 3 18 Benevolent Society Torah and worship The unusual form of the finials reflects the late eighteenth century interest in antiquity and the vogue for classical forms in the decorative arts An early precursor may be the columns designed by Johann Fischer von Erlach for the facade of Saint Charles Borromaeus in Vienna built between 1716 and 1737 The same high podiums with moldings on the church columns appear on the finials as do the winding spirals of the column shafts Kompff also made other Judaica for the synagogue in Kassel a third pair of finials of which only one remains and a Torah crown Source Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 p 123 The staves of Torah scrolls are often covered with crowns or finials made of precious metals An inscription on the base of these finials reads in part it is a tree of life to them that grasp it Proverbs 3 18 This inscription alludes to the wooden staves that the finials cover the Hebrew term for these staves is atzei hayyim which translates to trees of life Show Torah description Bibliography Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 p 123 Jewish Community of Kassel GESCHICHTE DER JÜDISCHEN GEMEINDE KASSEL UNTER BERÜCKSICHTIGUNG DER HESSEN KASSELER GESAMTJUDENHEIT Kassel H Grünbaum 1931 I 25 fig 14 NOTIZBLATT DER GESELLSCHAFT ZUR ERFORSCHUNG JÜDISCHER KUNSTDENKMÄLER no 23 1929 p 5 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Torah article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/27134-torah-finials (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Presentation Tray Lord Mayor’s Tray, 1708-09
    still one of that city s major synagogues This four handled tray represents the congregants 100 year annual tradition of offering presentation silver to London s lord mayor Beginning in 1679 silver trays were commissioned for the mayor and sent to him lavishly filled with sweetmeats Most of these gifts bear as a central motif the seal of the Bevis Marks Congregation a Tent of Assembly in the wilderness a guard at its entrance the whole surmounted by a cloud of glory Similar presentation pieces were also offered to the lord mayor by other minority groups namely the Dutch Reform and French Protestant churches This lord mayor s tray was fashioned by John Ruslen a well established English silversmith who had for twenty eight years provided Jewish ritual objects for Bevis Marks Aside from his five existing presentation salvers records indicate commissions for a sanctuary lamp in 1682 a pair of Torah finials rimmonim in 1702 and the Hanukkah lamp of 1709 depicting Elijah and the ravens The Dutch influenced repoussé work and chasing of Ruslen s tray demonstrate the polarity of silver styles coexisting during Queen Anne s reign The ornate if retardataire style of this tray was considered appropriate for royal commissions and presentation pieces Its decoration contrasts markedly with the severity of most silver intended for domestic use during this period This tray shows the continuing demand for opulent silver that followed the restoration of Charles II in 1660 Charles who had been in exile in the Netherlands and France returned bringing with him a taste for Dutch Baroque and the regal style of Louis XIV These tendencies were quickly adapted by English artisans Like the Jews Huguenots also sought freedom and opportunity in seventeenth century England After 1685 Huguenot silversmiths began to arrive in London when the French revoked the Edict of Nantes which had originally granted religious liberties to Protestants in France These foreign craftsmen brought new stylistic elements and technical innovation to the repertoire of English silver and not least forced unexpected competition upon native silversmiths The simplicity pervading most Queen Anne silver was due in part to the new regulations requiring higher silver content for plate and the consequent need to reduce the costs of fabrication Contrary to these exigencies the sumptuous Ruslen tray aptly demonstrates that the Bevis Marks congregants spared no expense to honor their lord mayor Source Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 p 174 Bibliography Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 p 174 Kleeblatt Norman L Dr Vivian B Mann TREASURES OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 1986 p 78 Roth Cecil The Lord Mayors Salvers THE CONNOISSEUR 96 May 1935 p 298 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Highlights article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/17436-presentation-tray-lord-mayor-s-tray (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Burial Inscription, 4th century C.E.
    life as well as pagan Christian or Jewish religious imagery These vessels appear to have been given as gifts at the Roman new year festival and at birthdays and weddings as well A peculiarity of these gold glass vessels is that only the ornamented bases have been found often with the edges of the vessel deliberately chipped away In addition those that have been found in situ come almost exclusively from underground burial complexes where they were embedded in the wall next to a burial niche This has led to the speculation that the gold glass vessels were used during the lifetime of the deceased and then placed next to the niche so that the survivors could identify the burial from among the multitude of others interred in the catacomb Of the hundreds of gold glass pieces that exist only thirteen have been identified as Jewish All bear elements of what came to represent the quintessential visual statement of Jewish identity after the destruction of the Jerusalem Temple in 70 C E This includes the Torah ark often guarded by lions and the implements that were once used in the ancient Temple of Jerusalem the seven branch menorah the palm frond bundle and etrog employed in the celebration of Sukkot and the shofar ram s horn These were sometimes accompanied by inscriptions that were similar to those on non Jewish gold glass The gold glass in The Jewish Museum collection is unique in several ways The decorative scheme is dominated by the inscription while the Temple implements are rendered inconspicuously A small shofar is situated at the end of the third line and a menorah at the bottom More important this is the only example that contains an explicitly funerary inscription and was therefore not used during the lifetime of the deceased The Greek inscription states Here lies Anastasia mother and Esther daughter in peace may their sleep be Amen The phraseology is quite similar to that found on the hundreds of marble burial plaques placed as grave markers in the Roman period Jewish catacombs as is the incorporation of the Temple implements and the Hebrew word for peace Finally the technique which this piece was made differs from other examples of Jewish gold glass in that it is not true sandwich glass The gold inscription was placed on a glass vessel base but the second layer of glass was never added over the surface A large crack in the piece suggests that perhaps it broke before completion and was thus left in this unfinished state One can only wonder at the tragic circumstances that led to the death of a mother and her daughter and that occasioned the commission of this memorial inscription Source Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 pp 36 37 Bibliography Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 pp 36 37 Schwabe M and A Reifenberg Ein jüdisches Goldglas

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/5493-burial-inscription (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Torah Finials, 17th-18th century
    centers to which the Sephardim fled after the Expulsion Italy was one of these centers In the sixteenth century its ancient Jewish community was revitalized by the arrival of Sephardic Jews who brought with them traditions of intellectual and cultural achievement as well as unique literary and artistic genres Secular and religious Hebrew poetry and the illumination of marriage contracts were part of the Sephardic artistic tradition as was tower form metalwork for both synagogues and home use Another Spanish usage transferred by Sephardic Jews to their new homes was the custom of decorating the corners of the reader s desk in the synagogue with finials similar to those used to ornament the staves of Torah scrolls The large size of these finials and their very heavy weight suggest that they were used on a reader s desk rather than on a Torah The body of each rimmonim is a three storied hexagonal tower Torus moldings mark the base and entablature of each story and spiral pilasters are set on every corner A balustrade runs in front of each story its corners support urns of flowers set on scroll shaped bases The result is a complex architectural form that projects forward in space on several levels The basic form is however obscured by urns filled with cast flowers and other applied ornaments that fill the arches hide the balustrade and overlay the spiral pilasters The largest urn and flower ensemble serves as a finial The blurred outline that results the obscuring of the boundaries of the object and the richness of ornament find parallels in other Italian Baroque metalwork A pair of lavish multistoried candlesticks made in Rome in the mid eighteenth century show these same characteristics as well as three dimensional floral elements and clipeus motifs found on these rimmonim Source Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 pp 112 113 Bibliography Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 pp 112 113 Grafman Rafi CROWNING GLORY SILVER TORAH ORNAMENTS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM NEW YORK New York The Jewish Museum 1996 p 46 237 239 Gutmann J JEWISH CEREMONIAL ART New York T Yoseloff 1964 pl 2 The Jewish Museum THE JEWISH MUSEUM AT 75 Commemorative album New York The Jewish Museum New York 1980 p 37 The Jewish Museum LOAN EXHIBIT OF ANTIQUE CEREMONIAL OBJECTS AND PAINTINGS FROM THE COLLECTION OF MR M ZAGAYSKI Exh cat New York The Jewish Museum 1951 no 1 Kayser Stephen and Guido Schoenberger eds JEWISH CEREMONIAL ART 2nd ed Philadelphia Jewish Publication Society of America 1959 no 22 Kleeblatt Norman L Dr Vivian B Mann TREASURES OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 1986 pp 88 89 Makover Sharon J THE JEWISH PATRONS OF VENICE Exh cat New York The Jewish Museum 1985 no 9 Mann Vivian B ed GARDENS AND GHETTOS THE ART OF JEWISH LIFE IN ITALY New York The Jewish Museum

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/17500-torah-finials (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Search
    the collection Programs Talks Performances Group Visits Families Teens Pre K 12 Educators Visitors with Disabilities Institutional Partnerships Talks and lectures performances hands on art making and more are designed to engage general audiences families students and educators and visitors of all abilities explore our programs About Welcome About the JM Contact Connect FAQs Rentals Located on New York City s Museum Mile the Jewish Museum is a distinctive hub for art and Jewish culture for people of all backgrounds From our unique collection to our distinctive exhibitions and dynamic education programs there is always something to see and do learn more Support Membership Individual Giving Corporate Support Planned Giving Travel Program Special Events Become a member today Individual Corporate and Foundation support are crucial to furthering the Jewish Museum s mission to collect preserve exhibit and interpret art and Jewish culture View All Memberships Shop Open today from 11 am 5 45 pm See what s on today Search 1 search results Collection 1 results Marriage Dress Fashions for the Millennium Protective Amulet Costume Michael Berkowitz American b 1952 Contact Us 1109 5th Ave at 92nd St New York NY 10128 Directions 212 423 3200 info thejm org Connect With Us Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Tumblr Pinterest Join Us Members enjoy valuable benefits including free admission discounts and previews of new exhibitions while helping the Museum to celebrate and share the rich artistic and cultural heritage of the Jewish people Become a member Terms Conditions Privacy Policy Press Accessibility About This Site 2016 The Jewish Museum TheJewishMuseum Gay Block and Malka Drucker A Recontextualized Ketubbah marriage contract ow ly YiXJP pic twitter com 06JHwtcU6U If all my photographs were lost and I d be represented by just one The Steerage I d be satisfied Stieglitz pic twitter com IYhhxFTL2L

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/search/collection?keywords=Amulets (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Search
    City s Museum Mile the Jewish Museum is a distinctive hub for art and Jewish culture for people of all backgrounds From our unique collection to our distinctive exhibitions and dynamic education programs there is always something to see and do learn more Support Membership Individual Giving Corporate Support Planned Giving Travel Program Special Events Become a member today Individual Corporate and Foundation support are crucial to furthering the Jewish Museum s mission to collect preserve exhibit and interpret art and Jewish culture View All Memberships Shop Open today from 11 am 5 45 pm See what s on today Search 20 search results Collection 20 results Torah Finials Engagement Pin New Year Greeting Wiener Werkstätte Vienna 1903 1932 New Year Greeting Wiener Werkstätte Vienna 1903 1932 New Year Greeting Wiener Werkstätte Vienna 1903 1932 New Year Greeting Wiener Werkstätte Vienna 1903 1932 New Year Greeting Wiener Werkstätte Vienna 1903 1932 New Year Greeting Wiener Werkstätte Vienna 1903 1932 New Year Greeting Wiener Werkstätte Vienna 1903 1932 Marriage Necklace Beads Engagement Pin Engagement Pin Worn by Amouma Bashi Simon Amulet Necklace Hanukkah Lamp Necklace Hanukkah Lamp Hanukkah Lamp David Heinz Gumbel Israeli b Germany 1896 1992 Hanukkah Lamp Amit Shur Israeli b 1955 Abram s Counsel to Sarai James Jacques Joseph Tissot French 1836 1902 Joseph Dwelleth in Egypt James Jacques Joseph Tissot French 1836 1902 Adam and Eve Driven From Paradise James Jacques Joseph Tissot French 1836 1902 Contact Us 1109 5th Ave at 92nd St New York NY 10128 Directions 212 423 3200 info thejm org Connect With Us Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Tumblr Pinterest Join Us Members enjoy valuable benefits including free admission discounts and previews of new exhibitions while helping the Museum to celebrate and share the rich artistic and cultural heritage of the Jewish people

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/search/collection?keywords=Jewelry (2016-02-14)
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