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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Sampler (Jesse Reichek), 1993
    These samplers are part of Reichek s installation A Postcolonial Kinderhood which included colonial style furnishings and objects and premiered at The Jewish Museum in 1994 Reichek has said of this work The re creation of my childhood bedroom explores the idea of décor as a means of Americanizing of passing and of connecting people to a past they wished was their own Trained in formalist painting Reichek taught herself embroidery in the 1970s insisting that women s traditional crafts can be a powerful means of picture making Source The Jewish Museum SHIFTING THE GAZE PAINTING AND FEMINISM September 12 2010 January 30 2011 Bibliography Berger Maurice et al MASTERWORKS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New York The Jewish Museum 2004 pp 240 241 Bloom Lisa E JEWISH IDENTITIES IN AMERICAN FEMINIST ART GHOSTS OF ETHNICITY Routledge 2006 Friis Hansen Dana OTHER NARRATIVES Houston Contemporary Arts Museum 1999 pp 76 77 Kleeblatt Norman L ed TOO JEWISH CHALLENGING TRADITIONAL IDENTITIES Exh cat New York The Jewish Museum 1996 pp 130 148 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in A Postcolonial Kinderhood article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler E R Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler Laura Engel Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler Harry Goldsmith Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler Susan Engel Golden Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 A Postcolonial Kinderhood Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler H R Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler Paul Tannenbaum Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler John P Engel Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler Wilma Reichek Tannenbaum Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler Lenore Oremland Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler E R Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler Laura Engel Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler Harry Goldsmith Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler Susan Engel Golden Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 A Postcolonial Kinderhood Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler H R Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler Paul Tannenbaum Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler John P Engel Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler Wilma Reichek Tannenbaum Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler Lenore Oremland Learn More Other Works in Feminism article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Louise Nevelson American b Ukraine 1899 1988 End of Day

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/33148-sampler-jesse-reichek (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection
    Works on Paper Search by Artist Name A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Title Artist Maker Medium Chronology Chronology Option 1 Chronology Option 2 Chronology Option 3 Geography Place Made Collection Area Collection Area Option 1 Collection Area Option 2 Collection Area Option 3 Accession Number Show Only Works On View Show Only Works With Images Go Search 2 800 of 25 000 Collection objects Feminism Since the 1960s feminists have defied an art world dominated by men Some art historians have argued that Jewish feminists are particularly attuned to sexuality radical politics and injustice Indeed Jewish painters have played decisive roles in founding and sustaining major feminist theories and art collectives Feminist influenced painting generated new ideas and challenged old ones shifting the gaze to encompass women s history experience and material culture These provocative paintings embody the tension between individual expression and collective politics between a traditional medium and radical action Some of the paintings address issues specific to women artists such as the representation of the body or the legitimacy of craft and decorative arts while others address social issues that galvanized radical protest This online tour explores how social revolutions take place not only in the realm of ideas and politics but in style and form Related Exhibition Showing 30 results Date made new old Date made old new Artist Maker A Z Artist Maker Z A Deborah Kass American b 1952 Double Red Yentl Split My Elvis Learn More Melissa Meyer American b 1947 Lilith Learn More Vivienne Koorland American b

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/filter/themes/feminism/P12 (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Linen, 2002
    Share Share on Facebook Share on Tumblr Share on Twitter Share via Email Print Linen Artist Maker Studio Armadillo Hadas Kruk Israeli b 1970 Anat Stein Israeli b 1972 Sharon Samish Dagan Israeli b 1971 Culture Date Petah Tikva Israel 2002 Medium Linen sewn and starched Dimensions 78 1 2 43 12 1 2 in 199 4 109 2 31 8 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Purchase Contemporary Judaica Acquisitions Committee Fund 2004 41 Not On View Keywords Conceptual Contemporary Judaica Religious Symbols Sabbath Festival Themes Food Drink Submit Picture Request In response to a competition entitled Borders of Sanctity Studio Armadillo chose to explore the subject through the covers used for Jewish ritual objects Does the cover make the essence holy or is the cover holiness itself Inspired by a Hasidic story in which the Sabbath table whether set on the Sabbath or on a weekday was found to evoke the spirit of the holy day the artists created a cover for the Sabbath table and its contents Source The Jewish Museum New York COLLECTIVE PERSPECTIVES NEW ACQUISITIONS CELEBRATE THE CENTENNIAL November 6 2004 March 6 2005 This work depicts a symbolic linen cover for a table set with the objects used on Friday evening at the beginning of Shabbat The artists questioned whether a ceremonial cover attained the same sense of sanctity as the item it covered They were inspired by a Hasidic story in which the Sabbath table itself whether set on the Sabbath or a weekday evoked the spirit of the holy day The work suggests the holiness ascribed not only to the Sabbath day itself but also to the festive meals and food related rituals associated with Shabbat Show Food Drink description Bibliography Bilksi Emily Avigdor Shinan eds Borders of Sanctity ART SOCIETY AND JEWISH THOUGHT Keter Press and The Adi Foundation Jerusalem 2003 pp 108 109 Provenance The artists until 2004 sold to TJM This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Food Drink article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Max Weber American b Russia 1881 1961 Still Life with Challah Learn More Piet Cohen Dutch b 1935 Etrog Container Learn More Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert American b Germany 1900 1981 Passover Set Learn More Moshe Zabari Israeli b 1935 Matzah Plate Tray for the Fourth Matzah Learn More Nodar Djindjihashvili American b Russia 1939 2002 Baking of Mazzot Tbilisi Learn More Cooking Pot Learn More Alyssa Dee Krauss American b 1962 Kiddush Cup Blessed Learn More Louise Fishman American b 1939 Tashlich Learn More Reuven Rubin Israeli b Romania 1893 1974 Pomegranates Learn More Peter Blume American b Russia 1906 1992 Pig s Feet and Vinegar Learn More Max Weber American b Russia 1881 1961

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/28246-linen (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Kiddush Cup Blessed, 2000
    the Sabbath and most of our holy ritual services the Kiddush in many ways serves to separate the sacred from the profane Marking the moment when the week becomes the Sabbath when the day becomes the holy day and even in another variation when we interrupt our lives to acknowledge death Blessed represents this transition from the mundane to the sacred The common box or carton like exterior with its squared opening references architecture and the man made world Its visibly used and tarnished surface reveals exposure to everyday life The rounded interior however is meant to represent the cycle of life while its reflective white surface made from pure silver creates a more sacred interior space There is a third layer also made of pure silver It sits like a sieve on top of the cup s opening This layer is entirely constructed wrought out of the word baruch repeated over and again In Hebrew baruch means blessed The sacremental wine bathes in these words and passes through them twice when the cup is filled and again when it is emptied In doing so the wine is blessed Also the lips must embrace the words in order to drink from the cup and complete the Kiddush ritual By this act the drinker too becomes blessed Both interior and exterior are made from different forms of the same material reminding us that secular concerns are a part of the sacred and that the divine can always be found in our everyday world Alyssa Dee Krauss Source Artist s Statement Since ancient times wine has been given special status as a food symbolic of holiness It is drunk on many important Jewish occasions to reflect the sanctity of these times including the Sabbath and festivals The Kiddush prayer recited at the beginning of meals on these holy days blesses the wine and marks the occasion as sacred Traditionally a special cup is used to respect the wine s sanctity This cup s simple exterior represents the mundane of the secular week The silver interior of the cup is formed by Hebrew letters that spell the word for blessed The wine in the cup contacts these words as do one s lips upon drinking the wine in this way both the wine and the prayer giver become blessed Show Food Drink description Bibliography Hebrew Union College LIVING IN THE MOMENT CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS CELEBRATE JEWISH TIME Exh brochure New York Hebrew Union College Jewish Institute of Religion Museum 2000 p 24 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Food Drink article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Louise Fishman American b 1939 Tashlich Learn More Studio Armadillo Hadas Kruk Israeli b 1970 Anat Stein Israeli b 1972

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/27640-kiddush-cup-blessed (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Etrog Container, 1995
    Art Themes Food Drink Submit Picture Request This 1995 etrog box is the first of a series of objects I designed for Jewish religious use The design goal was the creation of objects that would not employ the visual language of the past but would the result of objective analyses of the purposes of the objects The ceremonial and emotional values were taken into consideration as much as the various functions This approach is very much the same as my approach to any consumer products I design This philosophy resulted in new forms and even some reinterpretations of Jewish habits and customs I designed the etrog box to be carried to the synagogue by a synthetic string This string is an essential part of the design beside the carrying function it holds the two nearly identical parts together The form of the box follows the shape of the etrog fruit itself The box is felt lined to protect the fruit and the form of the box protects the precious tip of the etrog By turning the two halves ninety degrees a much more surprising form is created without changing the function I chose to use silver for its durability since these objects may very well remain in families for generations to come Piet Cohen 2000 This etrog container displays the artist s sleek streamlined solution to a traditional form Cohen s elegant minimalism allows only one embellishment a quote from Leviticus 23 40 which reads and ye shall take the fruit of godly trees Source The Jewish Museum New York CULTURE AND CONTINUITY THE JEWISH JOURNEY August 2000 June 20 2001 The etrog is a yellow citrus fruit associated with the holiday of Sukkot It is not eaten but carried with palm willow and myrtle branches together referred to as the Four Species in a special ceremony A classic Midrash commentary compares each species to a different type of Jew The presence or absence of taste and smell is analogous to the performance of good deeds and study of Torah respectively the etrog possessing both taste and smell represents someone who both performs good deeds and studies Torah The etrog is often kept in a case when being stored and carried to the synagogue this example mirrors the shape of the fruit with pointed ends to protect its fragile tip Show Food Drink description This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Food Drink article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Studio Armadillo Hadas Kruk Israeli b 1970 Anat Stein Israeli b 1972 Sharon Samish Dagan Israeli b 1971 Linen Learn More Purim Pastry Mold Learn More Reuven Rubin Israeli b Romania 1893 1974 Pomegranates Learn More Berthold Wolpe British b Germany 1905 1989 Wall

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/5305-etrog-container (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Matzah Plate Tray for the Fourth Matzah, 1986
    the Museum believes to be in the public domain PD are available to download on this site Other images may be protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights By using any of these images you agree to the Jewish Museum s Terms and Conditions Share Share on Facebook Share on Tumblr Share on Twitter Share via Email Print Matzah Plate Tray for the Fourth Matzah Artist Maker Moshe Zabari Israeli b 1935 Culture Date New York New York United States 1986 Medium Silver hand worked Lucite Dimensions 8 8 1 4 in 20 5 16 20 5 16 5 8 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Gift of the children and grandchildren of Charlotte Yudell M D in honor of her seventy fifth birthday 1986 94a b Not On View Keywords Contemporary Judaica Metalwork Passover Collection Area Ceremonial Art Themes Food Drink Submit Picture Request During the seder three sheets of matzah are discussed and eventually eaten They represent the three groups of Israelites the priests the Levites the servitors of the Temple and the congregation In the 1970s a fourth piece of matzah called the Matzah of Hope was added to the first three The Fourth Matzah was initially meant as a symbol for Soviet Jews who were denied religious and personal freedom Today the meaning of the Matzah of Hope has been broadened to include all Jews throughout the world who are not free to celebrate the seder or to express their Jewish identity Show Food Drink description This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Food Drink article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Berthold Wolpe British b Germany 1905 1989 Wall Hanging Learn More Max Weber American b Russia 1881 1961 Still Life with Challah Learn More Nodar Djindjihashvili American b Russia 1939 2002 Baking of Mazzot Tbilisi Learn More Studio Armadillo Hadas Kruk Israeli b 1970 Anat Stein Israeli b 1972 Sharon Samish Dagan Israeli b 1971 Linen Learn More Peter Blume American b Russia 1906 1992 Pig s Feet and Vinegar Learn More Louise Fishman American b 1939 Tashlich Learn More Purim Pastry Mold Learn More Alyssa Dee Krauss American b 1962 Kiddush Cup Blessed Learn More Piet Cohen Dutch b 1935 Etrog Container Learn More Sol Nodel American 1912 1976 Tin for Barton s Candy for the New Year Learn More Berthold Wolpe British b Germany 1905 1989 Wall Hanging Learn More Max Weber American b Russia 1881 1961 Still Life with Challah Learn More Nodar Djindjihashvili American b Russia 1939 2002 Baking of Mazzot Tbilisi Learn More Studio Armadillo Hadas Kruk Israeli b 1970 Anat Stein Israeli b 1972 Sharon Samish Dagan Israeli b 1971 Linen Learn More Peter Blume American b Russia 1906

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/2415-matzah-plate-tray-for-the-fourth-matzah (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Tashlich, 1984
    of the first day of Rosh HaShanah the Jewish New Year There they recite psalms and empty their pockets of lint and bread crumbs which they shake out into the water This symbolically represents the tossing away of their sins of the past year Show Food Drink description Bibliography Mann Vivian B and Emily D Bilski THE JEWISH MUSEUM NEW YORK London Scala Books 1993 p 123 Provenance the artist until 1990 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Feminism article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Hannah Wilke American 1940 1993 Venus Pareve Learn More Joan Semmel American b 1932 Sunlight Learn More Lee Krasner American 1908 1984 Self Portrait Learn More Nancy Spero American 1926 2009 Masha Bruskina Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler Jesse Reichek Learn More Joan Snyder American b 1940 Study for Morning Requiem with Kaddish Learn More Audrey Flack American b 1931 Matzo Meal Learn More Miriam Schapiro American b Canada 1923 2015 Blue Burst Fan Learn More Aimee Golant American b 1973 Mezuzah Case Learn More Melissa Meyer American b 1947 Lilith Learn More Hannah Wilke American 1940 1993 Venus Pareve Learn More Joan Semmel American b 1932 Sunlight Learn More Lee Krasner American 1908 1984 Self Portrait Learn More Nancy Spero American 1926 2009 Masha Bruskina Learn More Elaine Reichek American b 1943 Sampler Jesse Reichek Learn More Joan Snyder American b 1940 Study for Morning Requiem with Kaddish Learn More Audrey Flack American b 1931 Matzo Meal Learn More Miriam Schapiro American b Canada 1923 2015 Blue Burst Fan Learn More Aimee Golant American b 1973 Mezuzah Case Learn More Melissa Meyer American b 1947 Lilith Learn More Other Works in Food Drink article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Cooking Pot Learn More Studio Armadillo Hadas Kruk Israeli b 1970 Anat Stein Israeli b 1972 Sharon Samish Dagan Israeli b 1971 Linen Learn More Moshe Zabari Israeli b 1935 Matzah Plate Tray for the Fourth Matzah Learn More Sol Nodel American 1912 1976 Tin for Barton s Candy for the New Year Learn More Berthold Wolpe British b Germany 1905 1989 Wall Hanging Learn More Purim Pastry Mold Learn More Max Weber American b Russia 1881 1961 Still Life with Challah Learn More Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert American b Germany 1900 1981 Passover Set Learn More Piet Cohen Dutch b 1935 Etrog Container Learn More Nodar Djindjihashvili American b Russia 1939 2002 Baking of Mazzot Tbilisi Learn More Cooking Pot Learn More Studio

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/3319-tashlich (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Baking of Mazzot, Tbilisi, 1978-80
    the trip accompanied by my friend Albert Ben Zion It was the first of its kind and I believe the last it was for me the most depressing yet in some ways the most exciting experience of my life My grandfather a distinguished scholar and rabbi gave me much of my early education My father a prominent attorney during the time when faith in Marxism still inspired much of the Soviet intelligentsia believed that progress toward the new Socialist justice and decency went hand in hand with the relinquishing of one s religious tradition I always vacillated between these two poles alternatively intrigued and repelled by my Jewishness My journey was partly an attempt to resolve this conflict as well as a search for answers to the questions that had haunted me for years Most important to me were the answers I found during the journey It seems to me now that being Jewish and embracing it pushes one beyond the boundary of a nationality or a minority condition It forces one to get deeply involved in a perpetual situation to which there is only one answer that is to stay within the Jewish faith Once this is recognized by a Jew his or her individual situation becomes a justification for existence It is the life of the vast majority of Soviet Jews that I wished to preserve in my photographs These Jews are struggling to maintain their religious and cultural heritage in the Soviet Union despite the difficulties and the threat of extinction I realized my mission was to record the remnants Russian Jewish culture before it vanished The more I traveled the more I realized that I also wanted to photograph the people who are trying to retain Jewish culture Nodar Djindjihashvili Source The Jewish Museum New York HIDDEN LIVES PHOTOGRAPHS BY NODAR DJINDJIHASHVILI AND ALBERT BEN ZION December 8 1983 March 4 1984 Jewish law prohibits consuming any leavened foods during the week long holiday of Passover Because of this the making of matzah unleavened bread is a closely supervised process from the moment the wheat is planted through its entire baking process to ensure that it does not rise This photograph captures this process taking place in Tbilisi Georgia in the former Soviet Union In 1978 80 photographer Nodar Djindjhashvili traveled in secret through the Soviet Union to record the lives of Soviet Jewry and their efforts to retain Jewish culture in the face of many difficulties The making of matzah often described as the bread of affliction and commemorating the Exodus from Egypt is a poignant symbol of the challenges faced by this community Show Food Drink description This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Food Drink article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/2994-baking-of-mazzot-tbilisi (2016-02-14)
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