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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Tin for Barton’s Candy for the New Year, 1955
    Drink Jewish New Year Submit Picture Request Stephen Klein a Viennese immigrant to the United States opened the first Barton s Candy store in New York in 1940 selling kosher chocolates This tin decorated with images of the Twelve Tribes is inscribed with a traditional Jewish New Year greeting A tin such as this could have been as a gift to celebrate the fall Jewish holiday season and the customary wish for a sweet New Year Stephen Klein a Viennese immigrant to the United States opened the first Barton s Candy store in New York in 1940 selling kosher chocolates This tin decorated with images of the Twelve Tribes is inscribed with a traditional Jewish New Year greeting A tin such as this could have been as a gift to celebrate the fall Jewish holiday season and the customary wish for a sweet New Year Show Food Drink description This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Food Drink article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Peter Blume American b Russia 1906 1992 Pig s Feet and Vinegar Learn More Piet Cohen Dutch b 1935 Etrog Container Learn More Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert American b Germany 1900 1981 Passover Set Learn More Alyssa Dee Krauss American b 1962 Kiddush Cup Blessed Learn More Max Weber American b Russia 1881 1961 Still Life with Challah Learn More Moshe Zabari Israeli b 1935 Matzah Plate Tray for the Fourth Matzah Learn More Nodar Djindjihashvili American b Russia 1939 2002 Baking of Mazzot Tbilisi Learn More Purim Pastry Mold Learn More Studio Armadillo Hadas Kruk Israeli b 1970 Anat Stein Israeli b 1972 Sharon Samish Dagan Israeli b 1971 Linen Learn More Reuven Rubin Israeli b Romania 1893 1974 Pomegranates Learn More Peter Blume American b Russia 1906 1992 Pig s Feet and Vinegar Learn More Piet Cohen Dutch b 1935 Etrog Container Learn More Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert American b Germany 1900 1981 Passover Set Learn More Alyssa Dee Krauss American b 1962 Kiddush Cup Blessed Learn More Max Weber American b Russia 1881 1961 Still Life with Challah Learn More Moshe Zabari Israeli b 1935 Matzah Plate Tray for the Fourth Matzah Learn More Nodar Djindjihashvili American b Russia 1939 2002 Baking of Mazzot Tbilisi Learn More Purim Pastry Mold Learn More Studio Armadillo Hadas Kruk Israeli b 1970 Anat Stein Israeli b 1972 Sharon Samish Dagan Israeli b 1971 Linen Learn More Reuven Rubin Israeli b Romania 1893 1974 Pomegranates Learn More Other Works in Jewish New Year article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/3846-tin-for-barton-s-candy-for-the-new-year (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Pomegranates, 1942
    Tumblr Share on Twitter Share via Email Print Artist Maker Reuven Rubin Israeli b Romania 1893 1974 Pomegranates 1942 Medium Oil on canvas Dimensions 9 14 1 16 in 22 9 35 8 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Gift of Ambassador and Mrs Benson E L Timmons III 1981 20 On View Keywords Figurative Still Life Collection Area Paintings Themes Food Drink Submit Picture Request Reuven Rubin s still life of pomegranates depicts a food rich in meaning for Jewish culture It is said to have 613 seeds the same number of mitzvot commandments given in the Torah for this reason pomegranates are often eaten on the second night of the Jewish New Year when a new fruit is traditionally consumed Cultivated in the Mediterranean region for millennia and listed as one of the Seven Species in the Bible pomegranates have also long been associated with the Land of Israel They were thus an appropriate subject for Rubin who drew much of his inspiration from symbols of the land Reuven Rubin s still life of pomegranates depicts a food rich in meaning for Jewish culture It is said to have 613 seeds the same number of mitzvot commandments given in the Torah for this reason pomegranates are often eaten on the second night of the Jewish New Year when a new fruit is traditionally consumed Cultivated in the Mediterranean region for millennia and listed as one of the Seven Species in the Bible pomegranates have also long been associated with the Land of Israel They were thus an appropriate subject for Rubin who drew much of his inspiration from symbols of the land Show Food Drink description Bibliography Sarah Wilkinson REUVEN RUBIN New York H N Abrams 1971 pl 166 p 180 Provenance Mrs Benson Timmons Southampton NY about 1946 until 1981 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Food Drink article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Piet Cohen Dutch b 1935 Etrog Container Learn More Peter Blume American b Russia 1906 1992 Pig s Feet and Vinegar Learn More Alyssa Dee Krauss American b 1962 Kiddush Cup Blessed Learn More Berthold Wolpe British b Germany 1905 1989 Wall Hanging Learn More Nodar Djindjihashvili American b Russia 1939 2002 Baking of Mazzot Tbilisi Learn More Sol Nodel American 1912 1976 Tin for Barton s Candy for the New Year Learn More Studio Armadillo Hadas Kruk Israeli b 1970 Anat Stein Israeli b 1972 Sharon Samish Dagan Israeli b 1971 Linen Learn More Max Weber American b Russia 1881 1961 Still Life with Challah Learn More Cooking Pot Learn More Louise Fishman American b 1939 Tashlich Learn More Piet Cohen Dutch b 1935 Etrog Container Learn More Peter Blume American b

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/378-pomegranates (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Still Life with Challah, c. 1930
    Museum s Terms and Conditions Share Share on Facebook Share on Tumblr Share on Twitter Share via Email Print Artist Maker Max Weber American b Russia 1881 1961 Still Life with Challah c 1930 Medium Oil on canvas Dimensions 23 1 2 28 1 2 in 59 7 72 4 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Gift of Joy S Weber 1994 59 On View Keywords Sabbath Still Life Collection Area Paintings Themes Food Drink Submit Picture Request A great admirer of Paul Cézanne Max Weber first experimented with form and composition in still lifes while studying in Paris 1905 1908 From 1909 when he returned to New York until about 1920 Weber frequently painted still lifes in part because the struggling artist could more easily obtain objects than hire human models In 1913 Weber created Still Life Judaica composed of ritual objects for the Sabbath Despite the painting s subject the artist was more concerned with form than content By 1919 however he had abandoned formal experimentation and turned to Jewish subjects in pursuit of the spiritual Source The Jewish Museum New York CULTURE AND CONTINUITY THE JEWISH JOURNEY June 20 2012 present Weber s still life depicts the two loaves of Hallah bread that are placed on the table for Sabbath and festival meals The two loaves represent the two portions of manna the Israelites received during their wanderings in the desert before the Sabbath and festivals since manna would not fall on these days These loaves are traditionally braided They are covered when placed on the Sabbath table as a symbol of respect and of the layer of dew that fell upon the manna in the desert Show Food Drink description Bibliography Baskin Judith R ed and Kenneth Seeskin ed THE CAMBRIDGE GUIDE TO JEWISH HISTORY RELIGION AND CULTURE Cambridge Cambridge University Press 2010 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Food Drink article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Studio Armadillo Hadas Kruk Israeli b 1970 Anat Stein Israeli b 1972 Sharon Samish Dagan Israeli b 1971 Linen Learn More Peter Blume American b Russia 1906 1992 Pig s Feet and Vinegar Learn More Cooking Pot Learn More Purim Pastry Mold Learn More Reuven Rubin Israeli b Romania 1893 1974 Pomegranates Learn More Moshe Zabari Israeli b 1935 Matzah Plate Tray for the Fourth Matzah Learn More Alyssa Dee Krauss American b 1962 Kiddush Cup Blessed Learn More Piet Cohen Dutch b 1935 Etrog Container Learn More Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert American b Germany 1900 1981 Passover Set Learn More Nodar Djindjihashvili American b Russia 1939 2002 Baking of Mazzot Tbilisi Learn More Studio Armadillo Hadas Kruk Israeli b 1970 Anat Stein Israeli b 1972 Sharon Samish Dagan Israeli

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/4603-still-life-with-challah (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection
    Collection Area Recent Acquisitions Search Collection Advanced Search Feminism Food and Drink Hanukkah Holocaust Jewish New Year Marriage Passover Purim Reinventing Ritual Torah Antiquities Books Ephemera Ceremonial Art Coins and Medals Decorative Arts Installations and Media Paintings Photographs Sculpture Works on Paper Search by Artist Name A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Berkowicz Michael Title Artist Maker Medium Chronology Chronology Option 1 Chronology Option 2 Chronology Option 3 Geography Place Made Collection Area Collection Area Option 1 Collection Area Option 2 Collection Area Option 3 Accession Number Show Only Works On View Show Only Works With Images Go Search 2 800 of 25 000 Collection objects Food and Drink Food and drink often serve ceremonial functions in Judaism whether as part of a ritual meal to sanctify the Sabbath and festivals or to fulfill Jewish dietary laws Holiday meals generally incorporate universally prescribed ritual foods as well as local and informal culinary traditions Jewish dietary laws kashrut mandate how certain foods should be prepared and forbid the consumption of certain types of animals birds and fish Blessings are recited before and after meals to thank God for providing sustenance Every Sabbath and festival is ushered in with the blessings over wine and hallah bread the exception being Passover when unleavened bread or matzah is consumed instead while each holiday may have specific foods associated with it such as the matzah on Passover or apples and honey on the Jewish New Year Symbolic foods that are not consumed at all but still have ceremonial significance include the shank bone

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/filter/themes/food-and-drink/P12 (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Dreidel Mod-Diamond Dreidel, 2010
    Travel Program Special Events Become a member today Individual Corporate and Foundation support are crucial to furthering the Jewish Museum s mission to collect preserve exhibit and interpret art and Jewish culture View All Memberships Shop Open today from 11 am 5 45 pm See what s on today Search Highlights Themes Collection Area Recent Acquisitions Search Collection Advanced Search div data cycle pager thumbs data cycle pager template data cycle timeout 0 data download download Info Download Image Image not available for download Images of artworks that the Museum believes to be in the public domain PD are available to download on this site Other images may be protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights By using any of these images you agree to the Jewish Museum s Terms and Conditions Share Share on Facebook Share on Tumblr Share on Twitter Share via Email Print Dreidel Mod Diamond Dreidel Artist Maker Jonathan Adler American b 1966 Culture Date New York United States 2010 Medium Porcelain glazed Dimensions 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 in 7 6 3 8 3 8 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Gift of the artist 2011 30 Not On View Keywords Contemporary Judaica Games Hanukkah Collection Area Ceremonial Art Themes Hanukkah Submit Picture Request Provenance Jonathan Adler enterprises donated to TJM This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Hanukkah article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Arnold Zadikow German 1884 1943 Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Rod Baer American b 1951 Hanukkah Lamp Every December Learn More Michael Berkowicz Polish b Russia 1944 Dreidel Executive Dreidel Learn More Matthew McCaslin American b 1957 Being the Light Learn More Karim Rashid American b Egypt 1960 Hanukkah Lamp Menorahmorph Learn More Orivit Aktiengesellschaft 1900 1905 Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Mae Rockland Tupa American b 1937 Hanukkah Lamp Miss Liberty Learn More Johann Valentin Schüler 1650 1720 master 1680 Sabbath Festival Lamp Learn More Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Arnold Zadikow German 1884 1943 Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Rod Baer American b 1951 Hanukkah Lamp Every December Learn More Michael Berkowicz Polish b Russia 1944 Dreidel Executive Dreidel Learn More Matthew McCaslin American b 1957 Being the Light Learn More Karim Rashid American b Egypt 1960 Hanukkah Lamp Menorahmorph Learn More Orivit Aktiengesellschaft 1900 1905 Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Mae Rockland Tupa American b 1937 Hanukkah Lamp Miss Liberty Learn More Johann Valentin Schüler 1650 1720 master 1680 Sabbath Festival Lamp Learn More Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Other Themes Food and Drink Marriage Passover Feminism Purim Reinventing Ritual Torah Jewish New Year Holocaust Contact Us 1109 5th Ave at 92nd St New York NY 10128 Directions 212 423 3200 info thejm

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/33885-dreidel-mod-diamond-dreidel (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp Every December, 1995
    in order to create a dialogue about their meaning Rusted metal appears frequently in Baer s art and he uses the material to contrast the solidity of steel with the corrosion that occurs to its surface with the passage of time The artist explains that rusting objects serve as both relics and homages The density of steel imparts a solidity while the exterior skin of active corrosion infers the evanescent and ephemeral Baer s Hanukkah lamp Every December originally created for an invitational exhibition at the Jewish Museum of San Francisco is highly unusual in a number of ways Its architectural form suggests a humble two story house with mullioned windows and a slightly open door Its rusted surface suggests age and the passage of years The Hanukkah candles are placed within the structure so that when lit light pours through the door and windows creating a symbolic image of a cozy home ablaze with holiday light Writes Baer Lighted candles of course have a certain universal symbolism but for me Hanukkah is first and foremost a holiday of the home with the job of giving and taking tokens of love between family From the outside you see a simple almost crude house but it s the inside glow and sanctuary of a single family together basking in the radiance of the holiday candles that s the source and phenomenon of the story Baer notes that traditionally menorahs were set in the window for passers by of the community to see so that Every December actually harkens to the early days in more ways than one I would like to say that I knew that and incorporated it into my idea but I didn t On the other hand when one joins the spirit of something certain forces of symbiosis and intuition join in so I m happy with the overlap Baer s lamp is an embodiment of the home and the people who are part of the celebration of Hanukkah For Baer Hanukkah is a holiday of people not of ceremony and rather than creating the structure of a menorah form Hanukkah lamp the artist chose to emphasize the spirit of the holiday Source Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 pp 212 213 Bibliography Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 no 109 pp 212 213 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 no 109 pp 212 213 Jewish Museum of San Francisco LIGHT INTERPRETATIONS A HANUKKAH MENORAH INVITATIONAL San Francisco Jewish Museum of San Francisco 1995 p 27 Pulka Wesley Sculptors Explore Twentieth Century Avant Garde Concepts ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL July 28 1996 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Hanukkah article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/5367-hanukkah-lamp-every-december (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp Architectonic Menorah, 1985
    pager thumbs data cycle pager template data cycle timeout 0 data download download Info Download Image Image not available for download Images of artworks that the Museum believes to be in the public domain PD are available to download on this site Other images may be protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights By using any of these images you agree to the Jewish Museum s Terms and Conditions Share Share on Facebook Share on Tumblr Share on Twitter Share via Email Print Hanukkah Lamp Architectonic Menorah Artist Maker Richard Meier American b 1935 Culture Date New York United States 1985 Medium Tin coated copper Dimensions 11 13 16 13 3 4 2 in 30 34 9 5 1 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Purchase Samuel and Rose Riemer Private Foundation Gift 1998 31 Not On View Keywords Contemporary Judaica Hanukkah Metalwork Postmodern Art Collection Area Ceremonial Art Themes Hanukkah Submit Picture Request Richard Meier designed each candleholder of the Hanukkah lamp to represent an architectural style from various moments of persecution in Jewish history The holder for the first night depicts an Egyptian obelisk the last one evokes watchtowers from German concentration camps Meier writes that the candleholders are reminders of the common past and struggles that Jewish people have suffered and their resilience and strength which the Hanukkah story embodies Source The Jewish Museum New York REPAIRING THE WORLD CONTEMPORARY RITUAL ART November 4 2007 March 16 2008 Bibliography Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 203 Braunstein Susan LUMINOUS ART HANUKKAH MENORAHS OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 203 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Hanukkah article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Anika Smulovitz American b 1974 Hanukkah Lamp Light in the Darkness Hanukkah Menorah Learn More Orivit Aktiengesellschaft 1900 1905 Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Jowanov Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Laura Cowan British b 1971 Dreidel Smart Dreidel Learn More David Heinz Gumbel Israeli b Germany 1896 1992 Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Johann Valentin Schüler 1650 1720 master 1680 Sabbath Festival Lamp Learn More Jonathan Adler American b 1966 Dreidel Mod Diamond Dreidel Learn More Matthew McCaslin American b 1957 Being the Light Learn More Dreidel Learn More Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Anika Smulovitz American b 1974 Hanukkah Lamp Light in the Darkness Hanukkah Menorah Learn More Orivit Aktiengesellschaft 1900 1905 Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Jowanov Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Laura Cowan British b 1971 Dreidel Smart Dreidel Learn More David Heinz Gumbel Israeli b Germany 1896 1992 Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Johann Valentin Schüler 1650 1720 master 1680 Sabbath Festival Lamp

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/5341-hanukkah-lamp-architectonic-menorah (2016-02-14)
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  • The Jewish Museum - Collection - Hanukkah Lamp, 1958
    Wolpert American b Germany 1900 1981 Culture Date New York New York United States 1958 Medium Copper alloy hand worked Dimensions 11 1 8 11 1 8 3 1 2 in 28 3 28 3 8 9 cm Owner The Jewish Museum New York Acquistion Gift of the Tobe Pascher Foundation JM 51 58 Not On View Keywords Contemporary Judaica Hanukkah Metalwork Collection Area Ceremonial Art Themes Hanukkah Submit Picture Request Wolpert s artistic career began with private sculpture instruction and a program of study at the School of Arts and Crafts in Frankfurt Germany In 1925 he embarked on a three year study of metalsmithing which he then used to develop designs for Jewish ceremonial objects By 1931 he had succeeded in combining his training and interests in the creation of a remarkable silver and ebony seder plate that was first exhibited at the Berlin Museum of Arts and Crafts The work was a radical step for ceremonial art as it employed a geometric functionalist style associated with the Bauhaus and modernism It marked a turning point for Judaica Wolpert s approach to his work was straightforward the surface was kept plain so that the decoration did not overwhelm the object or detract from the beauty of the metal The artist used conventional fabrication techniques to shape pierce and overlay his works Elegantly proportioned and uncluttered his work exudes a sense of the sacred and mystical a quality that is palpable even to those unfamiliar with Jewish rituals or Judaica Part of the remarkable inner content that the artist strived for in his work came from his encyclopedic and intimate familiarity with Jewish literature history liturgy and symbolism Source Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 no 612 pp 195 344 Bibliography Braunstein Susan FIVE CENTURIES OF HANUKKAH LAMPS FROM THE JEWISH MUSEUM A CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ New Haven and London Yale University Press 2004 p 344 Braunstein Susan L and Jenna Weissman Joselit ed GETTING COMFORTABLE IN NEW YORK THE AMERICAN JEWISH HOME 1880 1950 Exh cat New York The Jewish Museum 1990 p 109 This information may change as the result of ongoing research Other Works in Hanukkah article data cycle auto height calc data cycle timeout 0 data cycle easing linear data cycle speed 1000 data cycle carousel offset 120 data cycle throttle speed true data cycle manual trump false data cycle swipe true data cycle prev cycle prev data cycle next cycle next Dreidel Learn More Mae Rockland Tupa American b 1937 Hanukkah Lamp Miss Liberty Learn More Matthew McCaslin American b 1957 Being the Light Learn More Johann Adam Boller 1679 1732 master 1706 Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Hanukkah Lamp Learn More Rod Baer American b 1951 Hanukkah Lamp Every December Learn More Anika Smulovitz American b 1974 Hanukkah Lamp Light in the Darkness Hanukkah Menorah Learn More Laura Cowan British b 1971 Dreidel Smart Dreidel Learn More Johann Valentin

    Original URL path: http://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/19208-hanukkah-lamp (2016-02-14)
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